Delaware charter school queen blowing kisses at state legislator with fingers crossed behind her back! Queen is blind to those being harmed

Delaware bill pushes changes to charter school rules , The News Journal

The first is a bill that would eliminate one of the enrollment preferences, which allows schools to prioritize kids who live within a 5-mile radius of the school.

Two schools currently have that preference in their charter: Newark Charter School and First State Montessori in Wilmington.

The 5-mile radius was included so schools could create a neighborhood atmosphere, said Kendall Massett, director of the Delaware Charter Schools Network.

“When kids are closer to school, it allows for our parents and our families to have more access to the school,” said Massett, whose group helped craft Williams’ bill.

Sounds like the Delaware Charter Schools Network are a group of segregationist via de facto segregation! Designing charter schools to serve at-risk students as a charter school preference is shameful and suggest a-risk children can’t thrive in a school with something for all students! Honors and at-risk! Warehousing minority students in a downtown office building with indoor playgrounds is reflective of what a public K-12 school should be!

Charter schools should be open to all students living within the traditional school district the charter school is located within.

 “It basically preserves our ability to fulfill the school’s mission, which includes focusing on the Greater Newark community,” said Greg Meece, head of school.

I thought charter schools were to be an incubator of educational innovations that could be replicated in traditional public schools! Though traditional public schools have feeder pattern and I’ll bet some have less than five-mile radius, the districts have Choice. 

Meece and Massett said the new enrollment rules could prove problematic if state leaders reduce the number of school districts in Delaware. Some officials have called for such a change to save costs, but charter advocates say that would also mean their schools would be required to serve much larger geographic areas.

“If redistricting happens, we may have to revisit this,” Massett said. “But we can’t deal with the what-ifs. We must deal with what’s in front of us right now.”

And there you have it ! The what if ? WEIC isn’t going to happen and if it did it would be a bonus to Newark Charter! Because Red Clay would takeover Christina’s Wilmington schools! Nothing more than a shallow argument! 

The bill does not change other enrollment preferences, many of which remain controversial.

Perhaps the biggest sticking point is a rule that allows charters to give preference to kids who “have a specific interest in the school’s teaching methods, philosophy or educational focus.” Williams and other advocates argue that allows some charters to “cherry pick” top students away from traditional schools.

Charters defend the practice as an important way to preserve their unique roles in Delaware’s education system.

Going after specific interest admissions would open Pandora’s Box! Red Clay does the same for their magnet schools, Conrad and Cab. Also, Votechs have a selective process! We really don’t need Cab! All public school should have enriched arts for all! Conrad theme is a bit of smoke and mirrors that really don’t justify it as a magnet school. At best, the high school component should be the magnet school and grades 6-8 should be traditional. Conrad’s requirement for Conrad’s graduating 8th graders reapply for high schools is proof in the pudding!

Massett said she thinks this kind of collaboration is better in the long run.

“Healthy compromise is what every American should want from good government,” Massett said. “If you’re always only looking to win, then somebody is going to lose, and that’s not what we are about.”

What an ant-brain analogy! Somebody has been losing for years due to discriminatory admission preferences.

Translation is, as long as it’s not charter schools losing then its healthy!  

  

 

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