Daily Archives: January 25, 2017

Dopey State Legislators! Just end the class size waivers ! Pilot Program with seed money always defaults back on local taxpayers!

Senate Bill 19

149th General Assembly (Present)

Bill Progress

Current Status:

Committee 1/24/17
What happens next?

Awaiting consideration in Committee

Bill Details

Introduced on:

1/24/17

Primary Sponsor:

Additional Sponsor(s):

Co-Sponsor(s):

Long Title:

AN ACT TO AMEND TITLE 14 OF THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO THE CREATION OF A PILOT PROGRAM FOR DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS IN EARLY PRIMARY GRADES FOCUSED ON REDUCED CLASS SIZE AND AN INTENSIVE LEARNING EXPERIENCE.

Original Synopsis:

Some students from disadvantaged backgrounds arrive at school lacking the same vocabulary and word recognition skills of their peers, putting them at a disadvantage when developing literacy skills in primary grades. In analyzing this disparity, studies have shown that the third grade is a critical turning point in educational development and that students who are not preforming at grade level by this point will continue to fall behind their peers at an increasingly rapid pace. This Act will seek to diminish this performance gap by creating a 3-year pilot program for disadvantaged students in primary grades in Delaware public schools. The State will provide $1 million in grant funding per year, over a 3-year period, to support the pilot program. Under the Act, Delaware State University, Delaware Technical and Community College, and the University of Delaware are invited to help collect and analyze data to assess the program.

Volume Chapter:

N/A

Fiscal Note/Fee Impact:

F/N

Effective Date:

Takes effect upon being signed into law

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compulsory school attendance in Delaware from 16 to 18 years of age. And how much $$$ will this add to the budget?

House Bill 55

149th General Assembly (Present)

Bill Progress

Current Status:

Committee 1/25/17
What happens next?

Committee Hearing takes place within twelve legislative days.

Bill Details

Introduced on:

1/25/17

Primary Sponsor:

Additional Sponsor(s):

Co-Sponsor(s):

Long Title:

AN ACT TO AMEND THE DELAWARE CODE RELATING TO SCHOOL ATTENDANCE.

Original Synopsis:

This Act increases the age requirement for compulsory school attendance in Delaware from 16 to 18 years of age. The age increase is phased in over a two-year period; accordingly, there is a one-year interim period where the compulsory school attendance age requirement will be 17 years old. The Act further provides that a child may be exempt from the age requirement for compulsory school attendance if the child has received a high school diploma or a certificate of performance or obtains permission to withdraw from school from the superintendent of the district in which the child is enrolled or from the president of the board of the charter school in which the child is enrolled. To obtain a waiver from the date of enactment of this Act until August 31, 2018, a child must be at least 16 years old. To obtain a waiver on or after September 1, 2018, a child must be at least 17 years old. The Act preserves the exemption under which a child may be excused from compulsory attendance upon request of the child’s parent or legal guardian coupled with supporting written documentation from a qualified health professional.

Volume Chapter:

N/A

Fiscal Note/Fee Impact:

 

Effective Date:

Takes effect upon being signed into law

School Tax deadbeats like Wanxiang prevents Delaware from expanding basic special education services @wanxiang

Many agree Delaware special ed bill is needed, but there’s no money for it Matthew Albright and Jessica Bies , The News Journal

Special education advocates say Delaware’s school funding system is denying important help to almost 2,500 of the state’s youngest students.

Rep. Kim Williams, D-Newport, is sponsoring a bill she says would fix that. Yet, despite widespread support, it is one of many proposals that has little chance of passing because of a projected $350 million state budget gap.

“I know money is an issue for the state,” Williams said. “But we invested all of this money into our early learning programs, and yet we have that void there in our elementary schools. This is something we really need to change.”

Williams’ bill would provide school districts extra money for students in grades K-3 who are in the “basic” special needs category.

There’s money to be reallocated! Get rid of the Chinese language immersion program! What as waste that is! I’ll be only 1% of students a best will grow up and use Chinese in a business application! There there is the charter school slush fund! What about the waste at top heavy DE DOE 

Acknowledging this, Williams tweaked the bill this year to phase in the services — and their costs. In the 2017-2018 school year, it would cost the state $1.7 million and districts $650,000; by 2020-2021, the state would be paying $12.2 million and districts would be paying $4.5 million.

What about deadbeat corporation not their school taxes such as with Wanxiang = School Balance Due:$989,251.54 with $845,970.79 owed Red Clay with the rest owed to NCCVT. Red Clay says, hands are tied go to your elected official and complain! I did to Red Clay School Board !!!! Crickets !!!!!!!! Red Clay can put a lien on the property which will jam Wanxiang’s pending sale! However, as you can see plenty of money out there! 

“If they don’t have the basic skills there by third grade, it sets them up to have a more challenging time all the way through,” Williams said. “If we’re really serious about this, we’ll find a way to get the resources.”

Amen to that Kim !

Conrad Alumni sends smoke signal to Red Clay Admin, Board and Conrad ! Re: Mascot / Logo

From Conrad Community Member 

An open letter to the Conrad Student Body from members of Conrad Alumni Association

Last week thanks to the kindness of a community member we received the ideas of the Conrad Schools of Science Mascot/Logo Committee. We understand you are voting for one of these symbols over the next three days. We see that you have put time and effort into this process which is laudable. However we are a little confused and are wondering why the original logo is not being offered as an option? We outline the facts below.

A group of us visited your principal in the fall and he explained the process.

He also said this group would be choosing a new Mascot. At that meeting we requested the following:

 To be kept in the loop during the process

 If at all possible have a representative from the alumni come visit you to share history and answer any questions as to why the logo is important to the community and the association. Upon leaving we felt he was open to doing that. This did not occur since we never got to meet with you. We are confused because we do not know at what point who decided the process. This is unfortunate now since we only been given conjecture as to why the logo is not being considered and no facts.

 At a recent alumni association meeting we were informed by the principal he would bring you our concerns. Did this happen?

 Receiving this information has left us at a disadvantage. Along with your student body — there is a large group of people — besides students — who are alumni and community members that have had to accept the vote of the school board dropping the name Redskins. Although not in agreement we have no choice but to accept the decision of these 4 people.

 The school board instructed the school administration to come up with a process that included students AND also instructed district personnel to continue with an education piece that would be shared with all of you — so you would have information that would help you make a balanced recommendation. This was never done. In politely accepting these guidelines our hope was:

 There would be a way to honor the past by retaining the logo that now exists.

 Share with your group the information we had gathered around the history of the school and the knowledge we had gained by speaking to Native American tribes across the country.

 Have you experience the media piece the district would produce

It is our understanding that you have not been able to openly discuss any of this in your talks because of the school board decision. We believe this is unfortunate. If all of these things have been discussed it would be helpful for the community and alumni to know about it. You are in a challenging position as students since you can only do what you are allowed to do and we appreciate that. We would however like to let you know with respect and kindness that losing this logo and what it has stood for over the past several decades means a lot to us. At the very least we think:

Students who support our thinking there should be given an option to write in or vote for the existing logo. If we had been given the opportunity to visit with you this would have been voiced

 This might be easier to accept if you had received what we believe would have been a balanced presentation of all the data that exists. Like you we attended Conrad. It made such an impression on us we continue to honor and support the school in many different ways. Some day you will be alumni too. Once you become alumni you will look back at what made your experience great and what you carry into your lives as adults. For us, when we see the logo that now exists:

 We think of the Love and Honor that we learned.

 The family of alumni many of us still are and you are all becoming.

 The fact this school was made into a high school again because of the tremendous support of the alumni and community and the legacy that exists and you are continuing to build now. Thank you for the opportunity to share our thoughts with you. We are communicating this with you because we care as much as you and want to make sure we are heard by you. Thank you for your attention to this important matter,