Why I Want Your Vote For The Capital School Board

Exceptional Delaware 2017

TwitterAnnouncement

For those who haven’t heard, I am jumping into the fire!  Anyone reading this blog knows my stances on education.  Is it enough though?  We need change and we need it now.

These are the reasons I am running.  I will tackle each reason below.

  1. Far too many Dover residents don’t want to send their child to Capital School District.
  2. Every student needs to be treated as an individual and not a test score.
  3. Our middle schools need a lot of help.
  4. We need more fiscal transparency and accountability.
  5. Low-Income Students.
  6. The Every Student Succeeds Act.
  7. Student Data.
  8. More participation from parents in the district.
  9. Special Education.
  10. More participation in state legislative matters.
  11. Charter schools within our district.
  12. Kindergarten.
  13. Support for our teachers.
  14. Ensuring opt out of standardized testing is honored as a parental right.
  15. More focus on the arts.
  16. Perception of the district.
  17. Perception of Dover as a result of…

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40 responses to “Why I Want Your Vote For The Capital School Board

  1. Publius e decere

    This faux-candidate’s numbered litany is undeserving. What school-board-relevant experience does this candidate have? What are his validated experiences, what has he supported in concrete terms, and have his supported issues ever carried the day in Kapital? And what specific policies does he intend to pursue?

    Being a not-curated blogger is not an accomplishment, it is a stump. An unaccountable one.

    How do we know that this candidate can make significant and meaningful change in the face of his opposition? Those opponents are experienced leaders in PTO and Charter school initiatives. Mr Ohlandt has no school oversight experience whatsoever. Fingers Ohlandt is practiced in criticism, but he had not served in a meaningful preparatory role. His opponents have real street cred experience, Fingers does not. All we know is that he is good at using a self-purchased blog platform to pontificate — which prevents any opposition to his litmus test platform.

    Little Kevin — name your specific initiatives and how exactly you will persuade thise many members of the public who disagree with you.

    Standardized testing … how exactly will you aim to address the achievement gap if you refuse to measure it? Serious question.

    Publius

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  2. Congratulations Publius! You finally did it!

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  3. lastDEconservative

    Your platform needs more words. The average school board voter will surely want to spend more time than it takes to eat a slice of pizza to study it, analyze it, debate it with friends and relatives, bring their children into the discussion, dwell on minutiae that will matter to the next generation and the next, ensure that their piece of the redistribution will remain intact if not grow, carefully tabulate all the ways that equality will be displaced by equity … why, who knows, perhaps they will even want to enter it into a word cloud generator to find out what you REALLY think!

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  4. lastDEconservative

    Did you state a position on the taking of our kids into the state ed-, er, schoo-, er, indoctrination system at birth? Will you accept the capital S States “first 3,000 days” program for your district, acknowledging that moms and dads competency to raise their kids is insufficient to the task, and must be supplanted by said capital S State? Did you address “what’s really going on” vis a vis the parallel stampede to the internationalism/America the terrible movement?

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    • I do not support any of those initiatives Last.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Okay, 2 points to Angos.

      What about this fave and its corollary, the two of which so eloquently prove that “it” is NOT about the chil’ren?

      To wit, the evil masquerading as good known as STEM, or to be more accurate, not STEM per se, but the coercion by the so-called adults with the power, of so many innocent young humans into fields in which they have no interest or aptitude, and the shaming of said youth AND their parents (or guardians or what have you) or caring observers (guilty) who dare resist. (Bonus point for correctly addressing the doubly evil focus on our little girls).

      And then the related more specific (and more recent) lie being perpetrated on our young’uns that “coding is cool” (to use the lullaby terminology). Which means that if you’re NOT of the mom’s basement dwelling gamer persuasion, you’re not cool.

      Here in the Republic, not only is it not about the chil’ren, it’s not even about the adults in a broad sense. This point is (in no small part) about Ernie’s payback for putting a smile on the evil face of the Rodel/Educracy/Govt axis of evil. I only wish I could un-see him gleefully acknowledging as much at the Leviathan and Sycophants Fall Festival a couple years ago.

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  5. Kilroy – good to post Kevin’s info for the capital voters. when will you be interviewing the other potential board members or will you continue your Markellian ol boy network ways and keep everyone in the dark?

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  6. lastDEconservative

    Next position question. Will you go along to get along when the time comes and renew the Fred’s hold on the teachers (and the concomitant diminution of children learning) instead of allowing that part of the labor market to seek its own level as it should, or will you lead the charge to make each employee stand on his own merit vis a vis their contribution to the chil’ren ?

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  7. Not my district but some thoughts as a parent and voter – not directed at KO necessarily but general observations. I look for a candidate to talk about solutions to issues, not just offer up list after list of what the issues are – and I’m talking thorough, detailed solutions, not just pie in the sky blah, blah, blah. We don’t need people who talk – we need people who can figure out solutions and make them happen. Which, by the way, requires working well with others and finding ways to compromise to work towards a goal. Does the candidate have a temperament that will enable him/her to take a seat at a table where others hold stong beliefs too? No temper tantrums or name calling BS, and check all egos at the door. My vote and the votes of my fellow citizens are worth more than that. 20 demerits for every time the candidate starts a sentence with “I” – running for any public office means you need to step way outside the bubble of yourself. Be accountable – it’s infuriating when fingers start pointing and it’s all “he did this” or “she didn’t do that”. Who cares – as an elected body, you ALL failed to get something done. And lastly – if you get elected to something, just do your damn job. Stop pontificating and trying to prove to everyone that you’re “right” – because someone will always disagree with you and who cares. The job you’ve been elected to do is bigger than your need to be “right”.

    Wow. Soapbox done.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Which, by the way, requires working well with others and finding ways to compromise to work towards a goal.”

      And let us never forget, we need board members that never, never, never run with scissors.

      PS: Compromise after collaboration after compromise ad nauseum has brought us the muddled up, mixed up stew of a mess we have today. Any semblance of a good idea inevitably succumbs to the dilution of 273 others (mostly of the same old same old variety). I’ll suggest that the emergence of a strong, single leader would be worth trying … just once. And God forbid, one that was smarter than to propose a 19 point plan, the second point of which will be obviated 34 seconds after the first move is made on point one. At worst, for once in a lifetime of failed collaborative efforts permitting -every- collaborator to say “not me,” some one somebody could be held accountable, and a path tried could be actually ruled out (or maybe even in).

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    • True – collaborating and coming to a concensus on every single detail is a totally ineffective way to run anything. That’s not what I meant but I see that I did a poor job of wording it. Being a part of a group, and certainly being a leader within that group, demands a certain composure and ability to treat others with respect even if you vehemently disagree with them. You can’t walk into the room and think that yelling and stomping your feet louder than everyone else is an effective approach. Nor should you expect to “win” every time. You can be tough as nails and fight like hell for whatever you have in your sights, but you don’t have to be an a**hole. You do, however, need to be willing to be accountable and able to recognize what you don’t know.

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    • lastDEconservative

      ” … You do, however, need to be willing to be accountable … ”

      I’ll concede that -maybe- a few are actually willing — at the outset. But when they find themselves in a system designed, and oh, so well refined to shield them from accountability, and worse, to make each clown in the circus look like a wise sage to boot, well, it’s hard not to become one more cog in the wheel. Most do.

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  8. Delaware should take a page out of the New Jersey school board and make it mandatory for Board members to do continued training and if they don’t, their taken off the board.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Interesting. Indoctrinatio-, er, training, by who, about what?

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    • lastDEconservative

      At first blush, it sounds like the perfect way to engender group think and diminish diversity of opinion and strength of personality in the interest of maintaining the status quo.

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  9. Educate yourself, makes perfect sense.
    http://www.njsba.org/training/

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    • lastDEconservative

      A quick click leaves me at, “No, it doesn’t.” When Hillsdale College runs a course, or David Barton, well, maybe I’ll go in case Break convinces me to make a run.

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    • Not that I think our school board members shouldn’t be knowledgeable but it’s a layer of requirement to train a member who maybe isn’t qualified to perform the task? If board candidates are not qualified to oversee the issues they will encounter, they should not be elected. Therein lies many of our problems; 200 people decide who may or may not get on a board and then these board members may or may not be qualified, knowledgeable, or experienced to deal with the issues at hand. OR Superintendents are hired by the unqualified or inexperienced board members who are in opposition to the will of the residents (knowingly or not makes little difference) the net result is the same. Mismanagement.

      So, NJ with one of the highest property tax rates in the country AND can raise those taxes without school board OR resident approval makes the attempt to insure more qualified board members by mandating training. “A” for effort but hardly the best representation if members have to be trained AFTER they’ve been elected to do the job. I do not agree this is the best model.

      Just some of questions that need to be answered before voting for a board member should be;
      -Will this individual vote to make the district better for the largest portion of the students? (vs. focusing on a vocal minority/ special interest)
      -Does the individual have a background in making decisions on a wide range of issues? (vs. deciding on what’s for dinner or which show to watch)
      -Has the individual demonstrated an expertise in administration or oversight? (vs. entering credit card data or taking pictures)
      -Will the individual be able to navigate and work toward making decisions for academic performance for the whole district?( vs. focusing on special interests that conflict with the overall progress of the majority in the district)
      -Has the individual demonstrated a personality of rational, pragmatic thought or are they guided by ideologies counter intuitive to the health and progress of the district at large? (i.e.: opposing school choice due to its academic and financial threat rather than focusing on improving district institutions to raise the bar on the status quo.)
      -Does the individual recognize the major financial responsibility of a district and understand the implications of misplaced educational focus? (vs. allocating resources on non-quantifiable programs and social justice efforts which threaten the solvency and sustainability of district coffers)

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  10. Publius e decere

    Just returned from travel, landing in yesterday’s snow was a chilling end to the journey. Took a regular pasting from peers in other countries about how dumb Americans are to be considering Trump. I told them that empty campaign posturing — which decries problems while being devoid of workable solutions — is an American tradition. I assured them that sooner or later Americans make the right decisions no matter how long it takes (channeling my Inner Churchill).

    So being tanned fit and ready (channeling my Inner Nixon), I’m refreshed and ready to take on The Kevin as a flawed candidate for public office in the great American tradition.

    In more than 3700 cloying words on his blog-soapbox, The Kevin listed 18 problems and a winding diatribe against each. But in that rant he did not offer constructive solutions. As The Publius has often said (channeling my Inner Rayburn) – any donkey can kick down a barn but it takes a carpenter to build one.

    The Kevin’s soap piece can be subdivided into three themes:

    1. The Kevin politically compliments the hard work of district leadership, building leadership and teachers. Great! But he also says that he feels the schools are unsafe, that parent engagement is low, that kindergarten is too difficult, and that charter schools are a lab experiment to be endured. Rather than simplistically complimenting hard work, why not compliment specific practices which the district does well and specific other practices which he will encourage them to adopt to “fix” the problems he lists? He says nothing about what he will do, nor about what “fixed” even looks like. He lacks the vision thing (channeling my Inner GHW Bush).

    2. The Kevin politically criticizes the state Board of Education, the state Department of Education and the federal Depart of Education. Hardly a Dale Carnegie approach. He has made it well-known that he doesn’t like being tested, nor testing anyone else. When an opposing view is presented (example, National PTA) The Kevin’s thin skin bursts with personal attacks. Which makes me wonder why he should be involved in education at all.

    3. The Kevin politically whips up the hackneyed frenzy of wasted money and fiscal transparency. He sidesteps the fact that he has no experience with large budgets or accounting or financial statements, saying instead that “we haven’t had a referendum since 2009”. So we can concede that he knows how to tax people. He did admit that he had no persuasive influence in his attempts to get WEIC money for Capital. And we know he had no persuasive influence on “opt out” with the Governor. We can’t determine whether or not he knows anything about how to define clear and measurable objectives for the schooling system and then to prudently and efficiently spend the public’s tax dollars toward those ends and then be held accountable for meeting – or failing to meet – those objectives.

    In summary, as a candidate The Kevin is long on criticism and short on solutions for Capital schools. Uncannily like the American politician I took a lot of criticism for from foreigners. Try traveling or calling your overseas friends and see if you don‘t get the same reactions. I do offer a solution for The Kevin: drop out of the race. The other two candidates have real hands-on experience in the schooling system and have far more viable odds to improve parent engagement. The district will be much better served by either of them.

    The true joy of returning from travel was to see The Kevin’s colossal error. A Don Quixote moment, with Sancho Kowalko egging him on. Publius has told The Kevin many times in the past that his paranoias and accusations were incorrect but The Kevin went ahead anyway and by his own admission used a made-up incident to libel someone. The Kevin should hope he has libeled a nice guy with a sense of humor rather than a Galicean. I doubt that such a person reads The Kevin’s drivel, but one never knows.

    Publius The Prodigal

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    • lastDEconservative

      Publius,
      If this is what rested looks like, may you nap daily! Most enjoyable, this diatribe. I hope the google has enough time for the denizens’ inevitable research today.
      – last

      PS: ” … for the schooling system … ” Thanks, I’ll take the hat tip. ” … in the schooling system … ” And again. 😉

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    • Publius e decere

      “Schooling” always delivers a solid effect when used here. Thanks for the inspiration.
      Publius

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    • You have no idea what the other two candidates can bring to the district, nor do you know what I can either. The truth is, you could care less about Capital. A Google search doesn’t show character Publius. You assume I would bring out my “blogging persona” to a school board. As I know you know, a school board isn’t a responsibility I take lightly. I accept my blogging would have to drastically change. Don’t assume you know everything about me Publius. Cause you don’t. You can talk to your buddies all you want, but trash talking me all the time, what is that doing for you? How far do you want this war to go?

      And real nice attempt with your “out of the country bit” and my “paranoias” and “libel”. Please, Publius. Give us a little bit of credit. Your whole “foreign outlook” and all the Trump stuff doesn’t fool anyone. If that was your pathetic attempt at deflection, it was woefully insufficient…

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    • Publius e decere

      Try this — explain what you will actually “do” on a school board and what formal education or vocational experience or educator experience you have which might inform your plans. How will you direct your points of view into concrete actions for the real benefit of the district. How will you deal with opposing points of view on the school board. That is really all we are asking.

      One of your opponents leads the high school PTO and has practical customer-focused work experience. Actionable and credible.

      Another of your opponents carries a PhD and has put herself on the line in a charter school startup effort. Actionable and credible.

      Neither of your opponents engages in misdirected personal attacks against community members, they do not engage in non-stop over-the-top stream-of-unconsciousness complaining about things outside of Das Kapital, and they appear to demonstrate in their approach to the election that the first rule of board membership is civility toward other points of view. Their first instinct appears to be to seek understanding.

      How will you be different? How will you add value? These are legitimate questions for a legitimate candidate.

      As Theodore Roosevelt said in the early 20th century: “the men with the muck rakes are often indispensable to the well being of society; but only if they know when to stop raking the muck…”

      As M Ryder says: What will you do to represent the majority as well as the minority?

      Publius

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  11. You know nothing Publius Snow

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  12. At times reading this blog, I don’t know whether I’m reading what adults have written, or I’m listening to a conversation in a middle school cafeteria among 6th graders.

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    • lastDEconservative

      One thing for sure, John, no one writer (even Shakespeare) or a team thereof (think Seinfeld) could concoct the characters or the story lines found here. Well, maybe Rod Serling, if you consider that a key element is finding yourself -in- the story line …

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    • Publius e decere

      Ah yes, the Twilight Zone … I recall the episode where William Shatner stars as a plane passenger who keeps seeing a gremlin out on the wing — which no one else sees. An apt illustration of what we sometimes see here in the Kitchen.

      Publius

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    • lastDEconservative

      There are many that remind me of Kilroy and the denizens. There’s a similarly small universe of characters that keep showing up, and the scenarios are at times eerily like a day at the blog. I’m working my way through the catalog on NetFlix now. I’m at episode 30 something of 138. One thing I note, the special effects and costuming on The Twilight Zone, circa 1959, are … better.

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  13. I’m going to do something difficult, painful, and rare, which is admit to a significant agreement with Publius. (It’s possible Publius will find it equally painful to have me in agreement, so there’s that.)

    School Board is a position of policy-making, building consensus in your district, building consensus on your board itself, and creating the atmosphere wherein your district can move forward. These are more the skills of a genuine politician (even though that’s often considered a dirty word) rather than those of an activist.

    Moreover, as new school board members quickly learn, they don’t generally bring their agenda to the board (no matter what they say in their campaigns); they spend most of their first year or so learning how the administration really works (it does not look the same from the inside) and reacting to the agenda items that chance and public opinion throw their way.

    To use Red Clay as an example, nobody would have predicted, three years ago, that the district’s special education inclusion report, the Conrad mascot, the feeder patterns for Cooke/Skyline, and WEIC would become the primary issues of the day in turn. Nobody ran on those platforms; very few people saw them coming. But once there they have to be dealt with in a highly charged atmosphere, and they take most of the oxygen out of the room for other pet issues.

    Opt-out is an important question, no doubt, but it is also like political primaries–only a limited number of people (parents) are even aware of it. Feuds with the State Board of Education or DOE are perceived by most parents in the district as a waste of time and resources that should be spent focusing on their children (they’d tell you that if you want to affect the Board or DOE you should be running for the General Assembly). Most voters want to see the person who has run the PTA fund-raiser successfully for the past five years in office rather than a political gadfly.

    Capital will need to pass a referendum within the next year, but a platform of saying in your campaign that many people have a poor perception of the district, and that the existing middle schools are not functioning well is both arguable and not the kind of rhetoric that brings people out to vote to raise their own taxes. If the middle schools are not performing currently, then why would anybody want to give more money to the administrative team that has failed to run them well so far? Do your plans for improving them start by asking for more money, or by shaking up the leadership of the district and the buildings. Saying “our middle schools need help” is not a position, it’s a platitude.

    It is all well and good to say that a confrontational, hyperbolic style would change once a bomb-thrower gets into the government, but the experience of history suggests otherwise.

    Publius, check this off on your calendar, it probably will not happen again soon. But not to speak in this context would be dishonest.

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    • Publius e decere

      Thanks Steve. Calendar duly checked. I like the summation you crafted: “That’s not a position, it’s a platitude”. I might use it from time to time, will always try to provide proper attribution.

      Publius

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  14. It is the inherent problem with SB in general. Sometimes a serious rabble rouser with one burning issue, be it conservative, liberal, kooky or sane realizes that it’s a much bigger scale than they are prepared for. Many a single issue, “it’s for the kids” candidates realize it’s a game for the big boys…..
    In reading KOs stuff… I think his heart is in the right place, I think he cares… But… Not sure that when the jabs get thrown he is the guy.
    Remember a SB member has a single mission… Serve the good of the whole public, make the whole school better…. Which is why some of KOs biggest critics on here would never and can never be a SB member…their perspective is too narrow on the other side.

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    • Publius e decere

      Actually, KO’s biggest critics want exactly what you suggest — a bigger and broader scale that single-issue narrow litmus-test hyperbolic rants.

      M Ryder wants the whole district to be considered, LDC wants people to recognize that “schooling” is indoctrination and that such hubris must be minimized, and Publius promotes public charter schools as a legitimate alternative to public traditional schools in a system where both can reach their potential.

      “Serve the good of the whole public, make the whole school [system] better.”

      The critics of hyperbole agree. Citing the eponymous “Down with Absolutes” lets focus on the whole district and the collaboration it takes to succeed for all, let’s not just cater to the vocal few one-trick-ponies within it.

      Publius

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  15. I love how all of you are assuming my “blogger persona” would manifest on the Capital School Board should I happen to be elected. ESPECIALLY coming from Publius! I am quite sure he didn’t use the same sarcasm and “wit” when he was a board member at “that school”. If he did, that would explain why he may not be on “that” board anymore. I would be an absolute idiot to assume I could act the same way on a school board. As a board member, I would be one of five. 20% of the vote would be mine. That does not give me 100% permission to force my agendas and be the star of the show. Going in guns blazing isn’t a smart idea when you are part of a team. Learning the landscape and seeing the persona of the other board members outside of the public meeting is essential.

    In terms of the other candidates, I would love to know their views and what they are looking to do, but no information exists at this point in time. If I am able to create policy that gets an affirmative vote based on my “bullet points”, for the good of students, teachers, administrators, the district, and the citizens of the district, that’s great. If not, there are other fish to fry.

    For those among here who think I am a “rabble rouser”, “one-trick pony” or a “one-issue” candidate, you truly don’t know anything about me. Running a PTO in a high school is certainly a worthy venture, but does that make them worthy of a school board? Planning a charter school that did not go past the application phase shows an attempt at something that didn’t really go too far.

    If I didn’t want to collaborate and share ideas, I would NOT run for the school board. But with that being said, collaboration is not the same as conformity. Of course I would need to obey the letter of the law and the board approved code of ethics. I spend a great deal of time pointing out how others in our state do not follow the same kind of things. If anything, having this knowledge is a boon and not a fault.

    Capital’s middle schools DO need help. It is by far the number one concern Dover citizens have about the district. This was echoed in the Strategic Plan forums they recently had and what I hear from 90% of the parents I talk to. Upon investigation, I have determined in large part why that is, which I will go into much more detail about very soon, but it is NOT going to be on here replying to Publius’ constant attacks.

    I’m a very easy and moving target for all of you to shoot at. I get that, and I recognize I put myself in that position. But all of you assume I don’t already know many of the things you have stated in this growing larger by the day comment thread.

    For Steve Newton: you mentioned several things that could not have been predicted with Red Clay. While this is true, some of them could have and should have been predicted. Most folks forget many of my concerns are based on what is coming down the pike. In the big picture, while some of the details have been wrong, how much of that has been wrong? While you make not like my style or the way I go about doing things, I inform the uninformed, just as Kilroy and Kavips do in their own unique ways. Just as you once did Steve. Reducing me to a “political gadfly” is somewhat ironic…

    Publius asked about my credentials running for the school board. Which is actually a legitimate question. Aside from a brief foray subbing or being a para at a Dover charter school, I don’t have teaching experience. I don’t consider myself to be an educator. I don’t have a PhD, nor have I run a school PTO. What I have done is educate myself on education law, state law, federal law, board policies, board ethics, school finances (at a district and state level), regulations, board practices, Common Core, standardized tests, legislation, non-profit companies and their goals and purposes in public education, special education, the DOE, the State Board, school climate, the effects poverty and violence have on student learning capabilities, what successful students are doing, teachers and their positions on current best and worst practices, what the citizens who don’t have an immediate connection to a school but do have worthy and valid concerns about the local school district have to say, current events at each and every school in the district, choice patterns, Civil Rights, the district’s Strategic plan, issues in Dover concerning crime and violence and drug use and poverty conditions, and questions that haven’t been asked by the Board but need to happen at some point.

    I make a point to read every single article on education that I can find. While I blog about the things I may oppose, that does not mean I am a person who shouldn’t run for a school board. Collaboration all too often turns school board members into a rubber stamp. I will not be a rubber stamp. Rubber stamps have led to many of the same things we all criticize in public education.

    Do I know everything? Of course not. Nobody does. It would show arrogance to assume I do. Everyone always learns. It is what we do (or should do) as human beings.

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    • KO, I have to say that if you believe everyone plays “characters” depending on the circumstances and that that is an admirable quality when dealing with the public trust or anyone’s for that matter, you are incorrect. So what you seem to be saying is you and others shift their persona to feed an intended audience. That is true for the individual who is practicing a form of deception. You say, blog commenters don’t know anything about you on the one hand but you present a persona (and an educational advocate one at that) that projects very obvious and skewed viewpoints on the other. That’s a contradiction.

      The take away here Kevin is your more recent posts are most assuredly “walk backs” from more incendiary and confrontational ones made here. Just as a politician may speak the truth and then find it is politically taboo and walk it back. (i.e.: Bill Clinton tongue lashing Black Lives Matter and now trying to back track because he/ she / they don’t want to offend the utterly disgraceful and dishonest BLM movement.) It becomes a credibility and character issue. Why do you think I am collecting every atrocious comment our esteemed Newark representative has vomited up on this site. I plan on providing it to the NJ for presentation before the election in the hopes voters will recognize his unsuitability for public office? He’s even been so kind as to authenticate it with his Signature. Will the “real” person please stand up?

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    • I never said those words at all M Ryder. I’m saying there is a time and a place. I don’t think I’ve backed away from you view as “skewed viewpoints” or “incendiary” comments at all in my recent posts. What you are saying is if someone doesn’t agree with you, it is “skewed”, but when you don’t agree with someone it is okay. Sorry, I won’t play that game.

      And while we are talking about “personas”, I hope you realize you will have to give your real identity in order for the NJ to publish anything you submit. You can’t just be M. Ryder from Kilroy’s Delaware. In which case you would leave yourself open for comments YOU have made on here. I would be very careful about trying to open up that can of worms.

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  16. LDC wants to spread the word that schooling is indoctrination….single issue a bit on the kooky side but still single issue…and pub promoting charter is another single issue. In both cases that single issue drives just about every post you make. It is agenda driven, the same way KO is agenda driven.
    Arguing whether or not being a PTA member or somehow connected to a school system is not what makes a school board member….their unpaid job is to oversee the professionals, make sure that the supers agenda is reasonable, responsible and then help him/her secure and be held accountable for funding to meet that agenda…

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  17. john kowalko

    M Ryder,
    I have an suggestion for someone with your obvious obliviousness to your own cowardly anonymity. Move into my district and run against me. Oh that’s right, you’d have to reveal the quivering and trembling lip that goes with your pseudonym. Bring me your collection and I’ll autograph them for you.
    State Representative John Kowalko

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