Can schools dictate what foreign language a student “must” take?

Can schools dictate which foreign a student must take?

The last sentence references “another foreign language”.

Does Odyssey have a state approve enrollment preference requiring Greek Language?  Now relax Lamb Chop! Don’t spill your mint jelly! I still love you but inquiring minds are asking.   Fair question! 

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17 responses to “Can schools dictate what foreign language a student “must” take?

  1. It’s not an enrollment preference – Greek as a second language is a core foundation of their program and is undoubtedly all over their charter.

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  2. Which is why it is called….. Odyssey…… I wonder if they teach bankruptcy?

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  3. Schools dictate what languages kids take simply by what they offer– some schools have a German teacher, others have a chinese teacher–This is another Kilroy non-issue–
    I believe Odysseys’ charter is “Greek” oriented-

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  4. If someone doesn’t like the Greek requirement, they have the ability to choose a different school. Wasn’t Odyssey formed as a Greek-focus school (hence the name)? As long as the school posts their requirements, the parents have the ability to make an informed decision and can join or leave as they wish. And, most schools ‘choose’ the languages their students can learn by hiring teachers of certainly languages. In my high school, we had French, Spanish, German, Latin, and Russian. My kids can only choose from Spanish, French, and Chinese.

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  5. Back when the earth was cooling, I believe some public schools required two years of Latin before moving on to another world language.

    It would be difficult for most schools to staff for every world language. To a point made earlier, not having all options available is a form of dictating which language a student must study in order to graduate.

    In the case of Odyssey, I don’t object to the emphasis being on Greek so long as parents and students know this is the expectation going in.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Back when the earth was cooling, I believe some public schools required two years of Latin before moving on to another world language.”

      First of all, kudos for a quite good turn of phrase. Next, even now, dinosaurs done, some schools, for example, Tall Oaks Classical *gasp* Christian school still teach Latin … and IMHO, it;s for the betterment of the chil’ren enrolled there.

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  6. I am all in on teaching Latin, Greek, Chinese, ….. you get the point.

    And all in on school principals and leaders choosing to support the languages that they feel most beneficial for their students. If the school community wants something different than what is offered, they should speak up and advocate for the programs they want to see in schools.

    I have heard nothing but positive feedback about Tall Oaks.

    Personal aside:
    I loved Latin class so much in high school that I refused to quit after the three year program was over. Mrs. Posatko was kind enough to let me independent study the fourth year. Or she didn’t want to hear me whine my entire senior year. I can still conjugate verbs in Latin. That and a dime will get me a cup of coffee, I know.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Keep the dime, the coffee’s on me. Etymology is a bit of an avocation of mine, well, a curiosity that I enjoy, let’s say. It must be a toss of the hair for you, since most (by my little bit of attention) modern words ultimately derive from the Latin. It’s a fascinating thing to learn the evolution of modern lingo as well as the origins and original meanings, how much languages that are so different, share, etc. Always a wordsmith, I really got into it once I clicked on the yes button for the MW Word of the Day button years ago. The science comes in small bites, just right. Congratulations on sticking with -anything- in high school! All I have to show for French class is a poor rendition of “the record player is broken.”

      Now that two Tall Oaks believers are exposed, listen for the fuse so you can run away before the explosion …

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    • Present
      1 Amo Amem
      2 Amas Ames
      3 Amat Amet
      1 Amamus Amemus
      2 Amatis Ametis
      3 Amant Ament

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  7. I stand corrected – but notice that’s it’s a requirement for “older grades”. I would assume this is done to help ensure that kids coming in a few years “late” aren’t totally behind those who have had Greek from the beginning. It has to be tough to transition in

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  8. CSW has Latin, temperature of the earth notwithstanding. I think you can take 4 years of it there. Re: Odyssey….they learn it from Grade 1 there…they learn math in English, then in Greek. It’s a core part of their curriculum. Instruction of content area in Greek. Non-issue. Maybe we shouldn’t let DMA wear uniforms, or march in parades.

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  9. Was wondering from whence this tidbit came from and aiming at which yet unseen goal ever since the Pencader took the mighty good direct hit from DoE.

    Odyssey is a fine CHARTER school, rather small in size, which makes it well-fit to do fine schooling without the unnecessary bloated staff. My kid went there and I’ll have to state that it is one of the best schools in the area taht leaves lasting positive impression on its students. Whether it will sit well with parents that it is mostly Greek charter school, living off donations from our local Greek community, which kind of tells you the direction it is going, is a parents’ picking and choosing, and am sure they can pick another fine charter school in the area, of which there is more than one.

    I’ll have to conclude that charters in general seem to be almost permanently in the line of direct fire from various sides. Watching yet another charter defending their turf just this year (mentioning the name probably would make no difference whatsoever), I am slowly building a conclusion that they are doing the RIGHT thing by existing and upsetting some kind of unseen status quo that us, parents, are ALWAYS denied the knowledge of, even though we ARE paying for the political circus that promptly arrives and sets up their tent uninvited every time the word “charter” is as much as hinted at.

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    • lastDEconservative

      ” … upsetting some kind of unseen status quo … ”

      Well said, Sammie. Since I already have my asbestos drawers on, I’ll add that Charters, by your wise summation, are the TRUMP! of government schooling (and in some cases, education).

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    • Publius e decere

      Sorry there LDC. Charters are not Drumpfing the system. Charters are innovating against the ossified ether —more along the lines of Sir Richard Branson, Elon Musk, and even at the times the great Jobs creator.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Methinks you missed my point, kind Publius. Trump may not be ‘innovating’ as you chose to term it, but he is very much exposing the ossification of politics as usual (think TPS/school board/state board) and the players therein (think unions, “educators”, educrats, sycophants, hangers on, i.e., the protectors of the status quo). AND, one may not personally choose to support Trump (CSW v. NCS) but one can’t deny being now aware that there are other choices by virtue of the “noise” Charters generate.

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    • Publius e decere

      ” think unions, “educators”, educrats, sycophants, hangers on, i.e., the protectors of the status quo ”

      You had to make me lose my lunch, dint-cha? OK, I better understand your point now. But I want reimbursement for my lunch.

      Publius TheTaker (of lunch)

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