Newark Charter School Denies Lottery To 6 Year Old Girl With Rare Disability @usedgov @foxnews @cnn @huffingtonpost @washingtonpost @disabilitygov @aapd @bostonchildrens

Exceptional Delaware 2017

The Newark Charter School admission policy has hit a new low. They are not allowing a child with developmental disabilities apply to the school for Kindergarten because she will be six years old when she enters Kindergarten next August.  Newark Charter School will have their lottery this coming Monday, February 8th at 6pm.

The parents’ daughter has an extremely rare disability called radioulnar synostosis that impacts her fine motor skills and limits the use of her hands and arms. According to Boston Children’s Hospital, this disability is defined as: Congenital radioulnar synostosis is a rare congenital difference in which there’s an abnormal bony or soft tissue connection between the two bones of the forearm—the radius and the ulna.  This disability is so rare, only 400 cases have been reported worldwide.

Her parents made a choice, at the recommendation of her pre-school, to keep her there another year.  According to…

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15 responses to “Newark Charter School Denies Lottery To 6 Year Old Girl With Rare Disability @usedgov @foxnews @cnn @huffingtonpost @washingtonpost @disabilitygov @aapd @bostonchildrens

  1. “Lottery”…. Funniest thing I’ve ever heard . Funny how students of parents ‘in the know’ or are part of the ‘A’ team end up ‘HITTING’ the lottery…. Lottery? Question, why would Conrad have a kid bring a science project , do a writing sample and interview if it was a “lottery” …as for NCS… They have just learned from the best….they should have just let the kid apply and then regrettably not HIT the lottery.

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    • Break, Conspiracy theory much? Maybe your focus should be on all the problems in our TPS’s that have lead to thousands of applicants at alternative schools. Nahhhh, you’d still rather believe that a lottery with armed guards and a lottery with every applicant’s name in front of thousands of applicants would be rigged. Do you also believe Benghazi was due to a youtube video? You must believe that gem, because I’m here to tell you that of all things, NCS does not play favorites with applicants. If you don’t have facts that validate your claim, you better have a lawyer on retainer because you’re entering defamation territory.

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  2. If a child has a right to access his or her district public school, that same right should carry over to all public schools. Plenty of children aren’t deemed ready for K at the usual age cutoff (esp. boys who turn five right around Sept 1). It’s quite common to start late, for social/emotional as well as medical reasons. I’m not aware that district schools give families any trouble about this–do they? I know they don’t let kids start early, which private schools often will based on individual evaluation. (The odds of admission even at that K lottery aren’t high. It would be wise of the board to put her name in and avoid legal trouble going forward.)

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  3. If a child has a right to access his or her district public school, that same right should carry over to all public schools. Plenty of children aren’t deemed ready for K at the usual age cutoff (esp. boys who turn five right around Sept 1). It’s quite common to start late, for social/emotional as well as medical reasons. I’m not aware that district schools give families any trouble about this–do they? I know they don’t let kids start early, which private schools often will based on individual evaluation.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Plenty of children aren’t deemed ready for K at the usual age cutoff (esp. boys who turn five right around Sept 1).”

      “Especially boys.” Really? “Aren’t deemed ready … ” … by whom? Oh, I see, by the same geniuses that “deem” everything else in government schooling (not education) to be right or wrong, in our out, cash or charge. I guess maybe the rumored shortage of Ritalin is real.

      “I know they don’t let kids start early … “. If not “early,” what, prithee, do you call starting the indoctrination process at birth? I’ve just gotten the sad news that the “Governor’s Birth to 8 Summit: First 3,000 Days in the First State” is sold out for tomorrow. Although I’m sure a few exceptions would be made for the sufficiently sycophantic.

      Letting these clearly undesirable boys spend most of their waking hours as infants in the charge of a unionized government employee will surely result in a better outcome for everyone. Why, think of it, by the time they’re toddlers, they won’t want to get near a climbing tree — they’ll know better. They’ll be wearing a helmet to eat lunch, and waiting permission to speak, pee, walk, talk, eat, run, read, nap …

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    • lastDEconservative

      If you dare, click on the “Birth to 8 Indoctrination Summit” agenda. Not you, M, please, not you.

      http://decc.delaware.gov/files/2016/02/summit-agenda.pdf

      If the agenda doesn’t put a chill in your very spine, well, you’re part of the problem not the solution. And chill or no chill, any one of you, except M, please tell me the expert involved tomorrow in leading the charge you would choose, if it had to only be one, better equipped to raise your child from birth to 8 than you.

      What.are.we.doing?

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    • lastDEconservative

      Could someone please let us all know tomorrow who won the awards?

      2:15 pm Success and Excellence in Early Childhood Award Presentations

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    • On this one you and I are on the same page Last. There is no reason for all this pre-K government watchdog intervention. It’s all about the benjamins…

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    • lastDEconservative

      Maybe on opposite sides of the same page. It’s not about money, OK, it’s about control, about the imposition of will, about knowing better, about protecting us from ourselves, about ultimately destruction of self reliance … and so on and so on (and scooby dooby doo waa).

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  4. lastDEconservative

    Gee, I wonder if maybe the charter schools operated on a full blown (if you’ll pardon the expression) budget as the district schools do they might have a few coins rattling around they could dedicate to this child’s special needs.

    ((Donning my asbestos underwear))

    The obvious charge here is that the child was denied for disability. No matter that it’s so rare that 400 cases in a population of 7,400,000,000 humans exists, one random charter school in one corner of the People’s Republic of Delaware should accommodate her? Just what would you have NCS do? Or the neighboring TPS, for that matter? You tacitly accuse NCS of doing a happy dance because their long established rules preclude her admission — once again, the denizens’ desire that the rules be bent willy nilly because the denizens say so. I call BS. WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE NCS DO?

    Hey, M, next time you make the list of attributes that apply to me, add “heartless.”

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    • So be it LDC, it is the “heartless” who willingly redirect their children to schools with lower resources where education and behavior comes first rather than places where equal outcomes and social justice rule the day. It is the NON-heartless who can ignore the nose on their faces when it comes to the many problems of our TPS’s and instead prefer to throw jello at the alternatives because they are just looking to drag through the mud those that defy the status quo. It is the NON-heartless that can accept their children being exposed to student violence, poor discipline, poor academics, and physical/ verbal assaults in the TPS’s while bemoaning a lower resource school not being able to accommodate every possible disability or request at the drop of a hat. The “heartless” have such a skewed sense of priorities.

      KO ask JY what ever happened to “Church”. If he doesn’t know he should find out. If he does know, maybe he can explain why there were no charges.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “The “heartless” have such a skewed sense of priorities.”

      I can only aspire to such an epitaph when the time comes.

      For Break: do or don’t the workhouses have chores for the less than fully able? Or do they discriminate? I forget.

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    • last, it wasn’t the fact the girl had a rare disability, it was the fact she would be six at the time of admission had she been accepted. NCS didn’t always have that policy. They just created it last September. Why, after 14 years, would they create that? Delaware state law states a parent can stop a child from going to Kindergarten if the parent and district agree. This happened. Does school board law supersede state law? NCS agreed to let her in the lottery, so it was a win all around. With a disability as rare as hers, I think it could be tough for any school to be able to fully accommodate her IEP unless they look specifically at the diagnosis and perhaps reach out to the few authorities who deal with this disability. NCS did the right thing, but I would seriously question the timing of their change in admission policy.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Why, after 14 years, would they create that?”

      Better to ask, “why, after 140 years, would they create Common Core?”

      But evolution of thinking is only lauded under certain conditions, eh?

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  5. At least M Ryder understands that there decision has a systemic impact. Sadly though, he/she just won’t own it, fragile ego and all.

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