Dave Sokola Kicks Kim Williams In The Back And Then Thrusts The Knife Into It

Exceptional Delaware 2017

Sokola

Senator Dave Sokola pulled a fast one on State Rep. Kim Williams in his latest political trickery because of his uncontrolled bias for Delaware charter schools.

Last year, State Rep. Kim Williams’ House Bill 186 was approved by the Delaware House of Representatives on June 30th, the last day of legislative session. Senator David Sokola refused to suspend the rules and said this bill needed to be heard in the Senate Education Committee. Fair enough. It was heard in committee this week, and it was released yesterday. Fair enough. What he did behind the scenes is what defines him.

House Bill 186 deals with charter school audits. Rep. Williams felt the charter school fraud and embezzlement was a bit too much for Delaware taxpayers and she brought the bill forward to allow the State Auditor’s office to monitor charters more closely. This is something Kathleen Davies from State Auditor Tom…

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11 responses to “Dave Sokola Kicks Kim Williams In The Back And Then Thrusts The Knife Into It

  1. Isn’t this -it – on the Charter School Board ??

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  2. Jacques and Sokola…proud democrats.

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  3. Would the cost of these audits be adjusted based on the size of the charter school compared to district size? Seems unfair to charge the same for a charter school of 600 students as you would a district of 15,000 students with taxing capability.

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  4. Short memory, Rep. Williams. How many millions have been mismanaged by districts over the years, even with the State Auditor’s office investigating? I’ve seen it firsthand.

    Why can’t the state require the contracts with CPAs include the issues that concern you? You could even include a clause that would hold them accountable for information they miss. Instead, you want to make the charter schools pay significantly more in an effort to make them financially weaker. Make the charge proportional to student population or overall budget, including capital costs. I wonder if the superintendents would support you, then.

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    • Wow, you are pulling no stops “Guest”. Low blows! Still, with all this vehement defense of the charters, I have to wonder once again what they are hiding that is worth all this. It’s not like they can’t get a “grant” from the Longwood Foundation or the Welfare Foundation or the Rodel Foundation to cover the costs.

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    • Since being elected, some charter school leaders have stolen or mismanaged million of taxpayer dollars . As I stated before, the Auditor of Accounts has gone on record stating it could cost the charter schools less money than what they are paying now –it really depends on the charter schools and their accounting practices. Why are you so opposed to accountability? Why do you want these schools to have the power to misuse taxpayer dollars? People are stealing your, my and others tax dollars — this has been reported over and over for the past few years, enough is enough!

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    • lastDEconservative

      Rep. Williams, you so freely use the terms “stolen” and the gentler “mismanaged” to describe a -very few- charter leaders’ -recent- “use” of funds, and have not yet come close to addressing the question of the same conduct -for decades, for generations-, by the ever protected educrat class by Guest and others. Prithee, what terms would you use to describe the “use” of funds, vis a vis results, for the legions of elected and their appointed and their sanctioned (ex. unions) for which we the makers never seem to have recourse? Frankly, one could make the argument that the result of having a head of school’s BMW serviced compares favorably with the results delivered to a 2d grader by a union protected 21 year old pony tailed well indoctrinated (read clueless) teacher in, say, CSD.

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  5. Rep. Williams,
    In no way did I say that I want charters to have the power to misuse taxpayer dollars. Why would you assume that disagreeing with your bill equates to that? I simply ask why you can’t require that clear, specific issues are addressed in all audits, whether they be through the State Auditor or a contracted CPA. This may actually save taxpayer dollars. Allow district & charter schools to negotiate contracts with CPAs and if the audit can be done cheaper that the cost of the State Auditor’s office, taxpayer dollars are preserved for the actual intention of those funds- children’s education. You have yet to say anything more than the State audit “may” be less expensive. That is a trademark political tactic to avoid actually answering a question. You have learned that skill quickly in your short time in office.

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