Back to The Future: Wilmington Year 2020! Fallout from Red Clay / Christina merge!

To Wilmington parents: Red Clay has been failing your children! Proof you say??? Red Clay has just as many Priority Schools as Christina! Red Clay’s high poverty schools are FAILING !  How can Red Clay serve more high poverty children when they can’t effectively serve the ones they have? 

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18 responses to “Back to The Future: Wilmington Year 2020! Fallout from Red Clay / Christina merge!

  1. You really want a WSD, don’t you?

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    • lastDEconservative

      Imagine the thud when THAT failure hits the ground!

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    • Publius e decere

      A “WSD” didn’t even make it into the WEAC’s playbook of possibilities. That committee definitively quashed it, along with definitively jettisoning Christina and Colonial. The best you can hope for now, Kilroy, is a sensible division of the city between Brandywine and Red Clay. The WEAC put a a clear priority on charter-friendliness for district-authorizers, so Red Clay carried the weight of WEAC’s solution for public education. They also sent a clear message of support for Red Clay’s willingness to engage in the Priority Schools hothouse and actually provide a structurally-creative solution without excessive pouting, posturing or pandering.

      WEAC controls the mic and you can’t be heard if you are too far off of their agenda. It is what it is, warts and all. The Governor acted quickly to implement part of WEAC’s recommendation — a moratorium on new state-charters and the development of a strategic plan by DOE and SBE. The game is underway. Get a mitt and get on the field. Drop the WSD agenda and figure out the best way to arrange Brandywine and Red Clay. Play your cards right and we might see P.S. du Pont High School rise again.

      Publius

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    • And Wilmington High School.

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  2. Christina is an absolute train wreck. In most States there would be a State take over at this point. Maryland would have added additional local board members picked by the State School Board who would work along with the elected board members for a set period of time. These are big issues that are becoming larger each day.
    1. Dropping Enrollment (lower unit count)
    2. Priority Schools
    3. Referendum
    4. Budget Cuts
    5. Central Office

    The battle with the DOE on Priority Schools cost them the referendum. All these issues are interrelated and can be boiled down to leadership. There is a consist state of uncertainty. Far more parents are opting their children out of their local schools then any tests.

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    • Pat, sorry to say but you live in a bubble. Are you really that daft, or do you just play so on blogs?

      I think everyone here knows the real truth so your attempt to spread falsehoods will all be ignored… But if you are serious, do you even know how to read a chart? Because obviously…. you haven’t…

      When comparing improvement over what enters into the system, Christina is second, only behind Indian River.

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  3. kilroysdelaware

    Published, there are those within the committee that don’t want a WSD because the don’t want to risk personal failure. It’s much easier to had the ball of to Red Clay to continue the blame game. More charter schools for Red Clay would be joke ! Look at DCPA! Red Clay can’t handle real oversight responsibilities. But then again Red Clay might expand charter schools in “Wilmingron” to keep the burbs pure to keep the affluent calm. In all seriousness , it all comes down to meeting the needs of those forgotten re: the promise. Red Clay charter godfathers made sure their First charter school served the elitist. And that move was a slap in the fast to the promise of “fair” and ” equitable” education for all.

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  4. I do take exception with the original point, “…schools are failing.” The schools are not failing. Schools are only failing when you buy the reform movement’s school rating system; a system that is designed not by parents and educators, but by for-profit entities. You have bought their line. You have bought their line that those schools are failing the kids. Have you considered that the schools are not equipped to serve those students? Who is the failure then, in reality? Take a step back for a second…would you call the child a failure for not being properly “equipped” by his teachers and administrators? Then why would you call the teachers/school a failure, when they/it have not been properly equipped either? Ask yourself (instead of belittling hard-working people who sacrifice greatly for children in poverty) what it is that these schools need. Are the priority schools getting what they need? If you can answer that honestly, I think you’d stop the endless yelping that CHRISTINA AND RED CLAY ARE FAILING THE CITY!! Put the blame where it belongs, and be a part of the solution.

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    • Have you considered that maybe the students you claim are not properly equipped, cannot be properly equipped? Have you considered that educational institutions cannot be equipped to address the problems of social dysfunction? Have you considered that, the schools and the legislators who tell the public they can “solve” poverty, CAN’T solve it?

      I do not blame teachers for not being able to teach the unwilling. I do not blame schools for being ineffective teaching the dysfunctional. I blame them for claiming they can if they could only get more of hard working people’s money. If you took Zuckerburg’s 100-200 million for the priority schools, what would they do to solve the social problems from where these kids come from? Is that the role of education? What would 100-200 million do for non-priority schools? hmmm.

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  5. John, how does one become part of the solution? So in your opinion, where does the blame belong? Seriously, this is the district I live in and I am watching it crumble. I don’t want to move but am watching people move out left and right due to the schools. I am watching kids graduate high school being patted on the back and congratulated for a job well done, when the truth is, many of them have been socially passed for 10+ years; kids who wouldn’t pass an 8th grade math test. What’s your answer to being part of the solution

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  6. Friends,

    Here’s some insight from Jenks (OK), a Baldrige/Education recipient…
    https://nistbaldrige.blogs.govdelivery.com/2015/04/08/improving-education-with-baldrige-tips-to-get-started/

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  7. Pencader – the truth is, RC is a net importer of students. But that’s not the point. The solution? I have no magic wands. There is a long list of steps that can and should be taken – the first of which would be to end the lease of WHS to CSW, and an end to the RC sponsored relationships with charter schools. Secondly, I would change the way in which we fund schools in this state. Referendums must go. Funding should be through elected, accountable, representatives (as Vo-Tech schools). Thirdly, dismantle the DOE and rebuild it as an organization whose purpose is to help develop educators. There are many more….but this is where I’d start.

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    • John, have you heard of this place called New Jersey? Have you heard what their taxes are like? Maybe a refresher course for you is in order. The referendum process is the ONLY thing stopping the rampant expansion of an educational system of waste and incompetence and you want to eliminate it? You want to give Carte Blanche to our “highly effective” state legislators who never met a tax they didn’t like and who have been extremely reticent to evaluate spending??? Come on.

      Dismantle DOE-agreed. It should be an elected board of three with term limits who can dictate to a governor, not the other way around.

      When the districts stop ignoring normal/ engaged students in lieu of special interests, and stop accepting dysfunctional behavior, then you might have a valid argument to ending the necessity of charters. Until then, our districts will be beholden to only meeting the lowest common denominators. Homogeneous mixing of students (if you don’t know what it means in a classroom, please look it up) with varied talents,capabilities, or dysfunctions has lead to teachers and schools being incapable of improving overall performance. The continued effort to PC the classroom has resulted in a socialist group with very little in the way of achievement. Are you prepared to allow aptitude grouping, are you prepared to allow teachers/ schools to separate discipline problem children, are you prepared to demand academic performance to pass grade level material? If not then step off the “charters are bad” bus.

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  8. Sorry…forgot to answer. Blame? We are all to blame. We’ve let the federal government take education away from us, without ever vetting whether they had the experience, knowledge, or proper motivation.

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  9. John you contridict yourself – “Referendums must go. Funding should be through elected, accountable, representatives” – “without ever vetting whether they had the experience, knowledge, or proper motivation.”

    in government those 2 concepts cant exist.

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  10. Arthur, Federal DOE is not elected, nor accountable. Our state representatives are, on both counts. I didn’t contradict myself. You applied my comment about the federal government to local government. Please read more carefully. And of course, MRyder, I know what homogeneous means in the context you use it (“homogeneous mixing” is a contradiction in terms)- what you mean is that heterogeneous classes have caused those problem, not homogeneous – I get it. I teach classes that are grouped by aptitude (homogeneous). I don’t know what your experience is. That said, do you have access to any research that leads you to draw these conclusions about homogeneous vs heterogeneous classes? Or is it just your experience? I would hesitate to draw conclusions simply on my own experience. Look, I’m not picking a fight, but I find it interesting that your argument for Charters is that they are a place for the well behaved kids to go (odd, because I’ve seen some pretty awful behaviors in many charter schools…really awful…in fact, I think one just might close very shortly because of behavior issues….) As an aside, keep in mind, when people use the word “charter” they are not simply talking about CSW and DMA; they are talking about charters as a whole, where overwhelmingly, there are accountability problems, fiscal and educational, that Kim Williams is fighting to change. You’re worried about your tax dollars being spent properly? Holy cow…look at charters (small “c”, again, not CSW). How many felonies have to be committed before we finally start holding them fiscally accountable? We’ve even seen from the results of last springs SBAC, that most charters performed no better, and in many cases, worse than their district counterparts. I know many will read that incorrectly….I am not talking about CSW. I’m talking about the others…you know which I mean. If you don’t, look them up. There is plenty of data available to the public.

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    • I stand corrected John. Thank you. The vast majority of TPS’s have heterogeneous classrooms. The so called “studies” claim that this is the preferred method of inclusion to improve “overall” class performance (and preserve self esteem). It only serves to perhaps pull some lower achieving students up. It does not improve the performance or capabilities of all students. As a teacher you must know that “knowing” your students is key to being an effective teacher. If the disparity between your highest achiever and your lowest achiever (or best behaved and worst behaved) is too far apart, there is no effective way to both expand the higher achiever’s capabilities and pull the low achievers up. The assignments and tests must be catered to the student body. A challenging test for high achievers will fail many of the low achievers. A low challenge test to allow passage of the low achievers will be useless in assessing high achieving students. This is the nuts and bolts of basic education that many of our TPS’s ignore for the sake of PC and student self esteem. Business people must know their customers and audience. Presenting to engineers is not the same task as presenting to sales or marketing. Presenting flashy packaging for a mediocre performing product may impress the sales and marketers but the engineers are snickering in the back of the room. An ugly engineered product nobody wants makes salespeople laugh. Think Pontiac Aztek car.

      I do not claim all charters are equal and completely agree that they should be accountable. The discrepancy is, what model is most appropriate for this accountability. I do not disagree that some charters are mismanaged and should be closed or never opened unless fully vetted. However, where is the corresponding level of accountability with our TPS’s. School boards with no more accounting sense than how to balance a checkbook hire 6 figure superintendents who in turn hire staff that may or may not have the district’s interest in mind. These self serving supers are nearly always short term, high dollar visiting dignitaries hired to turn things around only to be ineffectual. My claim John has always been, the public does not necessarily want charters, they want effective education for all students, not just the ones that are labeled most needy. The public is tired of being in the barrel of PC Educational incompetency.

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  11. I appreciate your comments. But again, I teach homogeneous classes – they are leveled on ability. In fact, I don’t know many kids at all in calculus classes that shouldn’t be. I see honors english courses all over public middle and high schools….honors algebra (in middle) honors chemistry, ap english, ap biology…etc. Not a lot of heterogeneous population there.

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