Conrad continues to shed black students

——————– (05)    (06)    (07)       (08)      (09)        (10)—–(11)—–(12)—-(13)–(14)–(15)
Amer Indian  0.0    0.1%   0.0%      0.1%     0.0.%      0.0%—0.01%- -0.0%–0.1%–0.1%–0.1%
African-Amer  30.4%  30.3%  27.7%  24.6%  19.6%  15.1%-13.2%–11.6%–10.4%-11.2%–12.4%
Asian Amer       1.1%    0.3%     0.0%      0.9%     1.1%      2.5% –2.6%–2.5%—-2.7%-3.9%–4.9%
Hispanic           36.3%   39.9%  46.2%  36.9%   34.1%   28.9%–24%– 22%—20.3%-18.9%–18.4%
White                32.2%   29.4%   26.1%   37.5%  45.1%   53.5%–59.7%–63.5%–66%-65.1%–63.5%

I started this tracking February 16, 2011 Careful how you yell success in school turnaround and the purging of African-American student continues. Conrad is an all choice “magnet” school. The questions are, is there something about Conrad that doesn’t appeal to African-American students? Do they not feel welcome? Has any African-American student choice applications been denied? Don’t get me wrong! Conrad is a great school ! But I want scream MF’er every time I hear Red Clay administrators boast how they turned Conrad around. Read the link!

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11 responses to “Conrad continues to shed black students

  1. Kilroy, turning around a failing school is the simplest task ever. I don’t know what all the fuss is about!
    As for them turning down black students they probably don’t have to , remember getting into a magnet is about access and knowing the system, understanding that the choice deadline is insanely early etc.

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  2. lastDEconservative

    “As for them turning down black students they probably don’t have to , remember getting into a magnet is about access and knowing the system, understanding that the choice deadline is insanely early etc.”

    I’m trying to decide if this best represents blatant racism, or is closer to the (supposedly kinder and gentler) paradigm of low expectational bigotry. While the distinction may come sans difference, our friend Break has demonstrated the dreadful state of mind of the many who believe “those people” are unable, aren’t self sufficient, and therefore must be “helped” by the likes of themselves, in some cases bodily moved to the front of the line by displacing those who ARE able (unfairly, of course) to navigate simple rules of the road.

    And for the legions of Kilroy denizens absent any measurable ability to discern, try noticing the disguising language: ” … is about access … ” and ” … deadline is insanely early … ” and ” … knowing the system … ” all loosely point to some imaginary, nefarious entity building roadblocks and creating secret handshakes which are impossible to navigate … then go back and realize Break means impossible for … those people, in this case, black students.

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  3. It’s not racism it’s reality, and nowhere did I suggest an escort to the front of the line. Knowing the system does help, just look at the number of educators (some out of district) that ‘get in’.
    I also didn’t say any of it was unfair. I’ve used my access, my connections to help my own kids and family members kids.
    Fact of the matter is those kids are not accessing RC’s premier schools at a rate they are at schools without an application process.

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  4. Is Conrad really a premier school? Why?

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    • Why? Because they got rid of a certain element and made it a destination school.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Premier” public schools. Mind blowing concept.

      ” … they got rid of a certain element … ” They being the aforementioned ones building roadblocks, setting traps, creating secret pathways that “those people,” that “certain element” can’t navigate. Wow, just wow.

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  5. So, you consider the school ‘turned around’? I guess old wilmington high has been turned around to?
    words roadblocks, setting traps and secret pathways come from you. You make stuff up to fit your agenda. But then I remember you saying children labor camps is the solution ….

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  6. “Fact of the matter is those kids are not accessing RC’s premier schools at a rate they are at schools without an application process.” – Why is that Break?

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    • Education is not valued in the home most likely. That’s the simple answer. There are systemic problems which I pointed out earlier but in the end a segment of our society does not value education

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    • lastDEconservative

      Break opines correctly, but partially, ” … a segment of our society does not value education.”

      Several segments of society don’t value education.

      The most damaging segment is the elites, the elected, the holders of the microphones and the levers of power. I submit that all the others largely owe their lack of discernment to this lot. Remove critical thinking skills, then tell them what to think. A simple recipe, bubbling along for decades, manifested once again (once again) in the SBAC results. Having heard it over and over and over and over from the aforementioned entities, sadly, don’t you think that the average boobus Delawareanus read the headline (and probably no more) about what we few call abject failure, and said, ‘well, what do you know, it was a success, just as they told us it would be.’

      Did I miss the part where Jimmy, the duly appointed sycophant stenographer for Coach and Beldar, or the likewise soppy editorial board, challenged the leviathan’s claims of success? Or better, asked (and this could have been any time since the dawn of the last next big thing) why, if RttT is panacea, hasn’t the brain trust, in charge lo, these many decades, put it in place before now? Hmm? Or, if the standards today are suitably challenging, prithee why they were set so low (and crowed about scores were so high) yesterday?

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