20 members of the Wilmington Education Improvement Committee were a no-show at Monday’s town hall meeting.

COMMISSION MEMBERS

Below are the 23 members of the new Wilmington Education Improvement Commission, which will work out the plan to redistrict the city’s schools:

•Chair: Tony Allen, Bank of America executive

Co-chairs: Kenny Rivera, Red Clay school board president; Elizabeth Lockman, Red Clay parent

• Eve Buckley, Christina School District parent

• Nnamdi Chukwuocha, chair of the Wilmington City Council’s Education, Youth and Families Committee

• Rosa Colon-Kolacko, chief diversity officer, Christiana Care

• Karen Eller, Christina School District teacher

• Meredith Griffin, education chair of the Interdenominational Ministers Action Council

• Frederika Jenner, Delaware State Education Association teachers union president

Yvonne Johnson, Delaware Parent Teacher Association vice president for advocacy

• Joseph T. Laws, Colonial school board president

• Margie Lopez-Waite, L’Aspira Academy Charter School president

• Aretha Miller, Community Education Building executive director

• Harrie Ellen Minnehan, Christina school board president

• Joe Pika, former State Board of Education president

• Chandra Pitts, parent and president of One Village Alliance

• State Rep. Charles Potter

• Vicki Seifred, Red Clay school district teacher

• John Skrobot, Brandywine school board president

• State Sen. David Sokola, chair of the Senate Education Committee

• Michelle Taylor, United Way of Delaware president

• One student each from Red Clay and Colonial, yet-to-be-named

Only 3 member of this commission (highlighted in blue) took the time to attend last Monday’s town-hall meeting and Dan Rich, a University of Delaware professor who is advising the commission. 

Three more town hall meetings are scheduled: 6:30 p.m. Sept. 1 at Cab Calloway School of the Arts; 7 p.m. Sept. 10 at Sarah Pyle Academy; and 7 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Eden Support Services Center.” 

I find it pathetic those who raised their hands to be part of this committee turned their backs on the public during  the town halls meetings. Real sad 😦

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31 responses to “20 members of the Wilmington Education Improvement Committee were a no-show at Monday’s town hall meeting.

  1. Mrs. Minnehan was present at the meeting last night.

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  2. Harrie Ellen Minnehan

    Got to correct you on this: I was there last night at the meeting at McKean High School. I think several other members of the Commission were also there.

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    • Publius e decere

      Yes, I heard that Ms Minnehan was present in the audience (although not on the dais). If anyone else was there, they were in same situation.

      Dan “Not-On-The-WEIC” Rich was apparently also on the dais. Is there a contract with his UD department we should know about?

      Word has it that tonight’s WEIC meeting was similarly light… two hours of “here is what we are going to do”. Zzzzz. While Rome burns.

      Not a chance of getting a quality job done by December 31st as I see it. If WEIC does not act to get an extension, then they will have no choice bu to shoot from the hip. Good luck Red Clay property owners, you have quite a few out of district people deciding your tax fate.

      Publius

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  3. Pingback: Wilmington Education Improvement Commission First Meeting Notes | Exceptional Delaware

  4. “I find it pathetic those who raised their hands to be part of this committee turned their backs on the public during the town halls meetings. Real sad :(”
    I agree. Talk is cheap. Glad you called them out Kilroy.

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  5. Do we know any school, district or state providing funds based on % of ELL and % low income?

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    • Publius e decere

      Good question, do we? Methinks not.

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    • Yes, many. Why don’t you check Google and post the information here?

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    • Publius e decere

      I pasted your rhetorical question, verbatim, into Google. Here is first link to appear: http://educationnext.org/do-districts-fund-schools-fairly/ The remaining scrum of links on the page were in declining order of relevance (in the World According To Google SES).

      According to the “best” article linked above, the largest unexamined area of inequity is within a district rather than across districts. An intra-district inequity is implicitly condoned by the district and in many ways explicitly enabled by it.. You know, like total dollars per student spent at Christiana HS versus Newark HS. Or at CSD’s Wilmington ESs versus their suburban ESs.

      The article notes that weighted formulas (curiously called “WSF”s in the article, which seems a letter off the mark) intrinsically reflect the caprice of the people setting the weights. The article also mentions the elephant in the room — that seriously distorting straightjacket roadblock to equal dollars across schools — the double-whammy of longevity pay-schedules, and longevity-based assignment bumping. Which results in high-dollar teachers deciding on where the dollars are spent, rather than the district. This elephant drowns out the effect of WSF dollars. The article didn’t even broach the topic of intra-school class size, where a 15-student classroom is arguably costing twice the dollars-per-student than in the 30-student classroom. Sort of like some schools’ “separate” AP programs and IB academies

      Now, a district “could” assign junior teachers to AP and senior teachers to the target-groups you have identified. They “could” assign junior teachers to large classes of proficient students and senior teachers to smaller classes of at-risk students. This would certain apply many more dollars to the goal of your point. But most districts, and unions, and teachers, and parents, would resist that for very parochial reasons. Which is why this topic always ends up being a weak cry for raising taxes rather than being about the hard work of smart spending with the tax monies we already raise.

      Maybe I am no good at Google. Your turn.

      Publius

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    • Publics – .Google is NOT your friend. In fact Google apparently doesn’t even like you.

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    • Publius, did you just juxtapose “small” and “class”?

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    • Publius e decere

      I was illustrating that the vast majority of the dollars spent per student are in compensation and benefits for the adults and any semblance of needs-focus for our tax dollars is eviscerated by factory-style bumping practices. Those dollars and practices are heavily “weighted” to benefit adult employees and within that group they disproportionately benefit long-service employees over shorter service employees. Which might be acceptable to the public if the schools were generating student outcomes at grade-level proficiency on a 21st century competitive standard. But we are not there nor even close.

      Small class size has only shown a (small) statistically meaningful advantage in grades K-2 and only when the class size falls below 15 kids and even then these marginal advantages only appear in the U.S.. It is an expensive approach of dubious payback.

      So I was suggesting that if people want more dollars spent in high-needs classroom, then just assign the highest paid teachers there. Oh wait, RTTT suggested paying a bonus to certain teachers for just such a solution and the unions freaked out. But many taxpayers want to try it (reassigning the workforce) before conceding to (even higher) additional taxes to fund a dubious small-class-size scheme across K-12.

      Publius

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  6. Come on Kilroy. These people are volunteers. It is not reasonable to expect the whole commission to come to every town hall meeting. Their schedule is full enough just attending the WEIC working meetings, which will be happening monthly-plus for the rest of the year.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Wow, five whole meetings maybe? I’d hate to be forced into that level of servitude … oh, wait, they volunteered.

      I doubt you’ll ever see more than 3 or 4 of them in the same place at the same time — in front of John Q. that is. The fewer present at any one time, the less likely it is that the patently obvious idiocracy they are willing participants in will be exposed at a level that boobus Delawareanus could recognize and be appalled by.

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    • I saw the whole commission at their first meeting on Tuesday night. There were maybe 18-20 members of the public. There was a level of public participation unheard of in Delaware. Tony asked us to stand up and introduce ourselves with a brief summary, and invited us to participate or ask questions at any time throughout the proceedings. At the end the public got their customary time to speak, and nobody was holding a stopwatch. Their questions were answered and follow-ups were allowed.

      In addition to the monthly meetings, each member is assigned to at least one subcommittee, which is where I expect the real work will take place. Subcommittees are also open to the public in the same manner.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “There were maybe 18-20 members of the public. There was a level of public participation unheard of in Delaware.”

      I struggled with the obvious contradiction of the two statements. Then I remembered to check my govt-can-do-no-wrong reference book. There it was, under Zombies Aren’t Able to Discern.

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    • lastDEconservative

      So the commission outnumbers the citizens that give a tinker’s damn.

      Surprise.

      Could it be that the great unwashed ain’t buying it? Iteration number 382 of the same old same old, that is?

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  7. alsonewarkmom

    Why no student from Christina? Anybody know?

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  8. Hey, another poitical committee! Awesome and Tony Allen is chairing it! what’s this, his 6 or 7th political committee chairmanship?

    get rid of all school districts and make each school its own entity run by its own board and the principal decides how the monies are to be used. a statewide formula for salaries, but everything above salaries and building upkeep is discretionary to the school and its staff and board. no need for a ton of admin. no need for the DOE. imagine it. principals making $150k and teachers making $75k and all of them fully invested in the success of their school.

    nah, thats too difficult to do. too many political teats that need sucking that would be out of jobs and thats a lot of lost votes.

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  9. What responsibilities do district personnel perform that are not accomplished by a Charter school?

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    • “What responsibilities do district personnel perform that are not accomplished by a Charter school?”

      Take responsibility for educating every student in their feeder pattern.

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    • MO-

      “What responsibilities do district personnel perform that are not accomplished by a Charter school?”

      -Redistribute resources to those deemed “neediest” while providing what is left to those who are left wanting more than the basic ABC.
      -Administrate the myriad of wrongheaded and politically correct legislation.
      -Parlay the bait and switch of referendums to the residents without executing quantifiable results.
      -Attempt to provide non educational social services via educational funding supplied by property taxpaying residents.
      -Refuse to separate the behavioral and disengaged academically from the larger population of wanting students.
      -Refuse to fail students who are unwilling to exert effort (i.e.: socially promote)
      Mis-characterize the blatant inefficiencies and financial waste while refusing to perform definitive audits disclosed to the public to identify where and what money should be spent.
      -Make decisions such as absorb entire sections of other districts without resident approval.

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    • lastDEconservative

      A remarkably on-point list from my elitist, stupid, selfish friend, M.

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  10. Vicki Seifred

    Kilroy, I was present at the RCCSD Board meeting where this presentation was made. WEIC only had their first meeting the following night. (Tuesday) There is another meeting at CAB that ggggggyI hope to attend.

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  11. Greg MAZZOTTA

    Vicki,

    You commented earlier regarding the benefits of the Baldrige education framework for school improvement commenting that reading proficiency increased. While the state resources for this were terminated in 2009, I was asked to help refresh this program in 2012 and am seeking ways to engage and provide assistance to school leaders; Might you help? Thank-You.
    Let’s connect – GFMAZZOTTA@GMail.com

    I volunteered on the Christina referendum and spoke with Mrs. Minnehan
    and other leaders and was collaborating with Dr. Fara Zimmerman, who, after several months of trying to set a planning meeting; announced her retirement.

    Now, we have new (or soon to be) Superintendents in: Capital, Lake Forest, Milford, Laurel, Seaford; Five out of nineteen districts. Many education leaders seem to have forgotten the value of our work in 2000 in Milford, Christina, Red Clay and others. The DOE and SBOE have not responded to numerous invitations.

    Please let me know how I might help you.

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    • lastDEconservative

      You poor broken record fellow. ” … education leaders seem to have forgotten the value of our work in 2000 … ”

      Setting aside that there is, at best, schooling, not education in Delaware, and there certainly are not any leaders present, I’ll guess you haven’t taken notice that the sights are set here on Colossal Failure 2025 (come see for yourself in October), not success (alleged at least) 15 years ago.

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  12. The process is just getting started. There aren’t a lot of answers yet – certainly not that another 17 people on stage could answer any better than those who were could. It was a public information meeting, and I believe the individuals present answered what they could (or what anybody could, at this point). Unbunch that which is bunched.

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    • lastDEconservative

      You poor broken record fellow. ” … education leaders seem to have forgotten the value of our work in 2000 … ”

      Setting aside that there is, at best, schooling, not education in Delaware, and there certainly are not any leaders present, I’ll guess you haven’t taken notice that the sights are set here on Colossal Failure 2025 (come see for yourself in October), not success (alleged at least) 15 years ago.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Apologies for the misposting meant for Greg Baldridge under John.

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  13. That’s ok….no offense taken. And neither do my kids take offense, all of whom were educated in public schools, and off succeeding very well in the world. Whodathunkit. Public schooling…chemical engineering.

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  14. Currently, all students are considered College Prep, so unless you are AP you can not get away from those that do not have the background or inclination to perform in CP courses. The result is the slowest holding back those that are ready to learn. RC has over 50% special needs CP students.

    I asked a AI principal to help and she told me “they are incorrigibles”. I said as a taxpayer, just do it. She said, “I’m a much bigger taxpayer than you’ll ever be!” Just to understand where they are coming from….

    >>>Thinking outside the box, would the students, suburban and city, be better off if a Vo-Tech model was produced allowing everyone to pursue a 21st Century vocation. After all, Charter schools are really just Vo-Techs for alternative careers, like banking and math.

    The future worth building is the Vo-Tech model for 21st Century skills and academics. Incorporate the current NCC Vo-Tech and the Wilmington Improvement movement together. Bring in the 4 or 5 current districts for efficiency and tax across the County equally.

    But, don’t hang a bloated and “consolidated” Super Red Clay on Red Clay Taxpayers. Mixing districts 30 years ago, resulted in prevalent (continuous) classroom disruptions. Let the students buy into their own futures in the proven Vo-Tech model. Teach printing and cursive to elementary students again. Skills matter!

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