Red Clay School District takeover of Wilmington Christina schools does nothing to address de facto segregation

Call me what you want but, long before the public and many legislators grasp the political agenda buried deep in Race to The Top, Common Core Standards and the Smarter Balanced Assessment John Young and I were firing the warning shots!  We had the foresight to see the Washington and Wall Street Trojan Horse coming. Our school union leaders and administration also knew these programs were tainted! They did so to go along to get along and yes indeed where held $$$ hostage by the likes of Governor Markell. But they knew! And indeed there was that “limo deal”.  

I am here to tell you, the plan to have Red Clay Consolidated  Schools District take ownership of struggling schools within Christina School District located in Wilmington Delaware is a major social train wreck in the making! 

Hear me out ! With the inception of charter schools, choice schools and expansion of magnet schools that are supported by laws such as the charter school legislation and Neighborhood Schools Act, the city of Wilmington schools including charter school located in the city have returned to minority population pre-court order desegregation aka to whites force busing levels!

I don’t oppose school student population racially reflective of surrounding neighborhoods. However what Delaware lawmakers created with the help of their white affluent supporters whom a few notables help craft the charter school law, neighborhoods school laws and Choice school laws seeded de facto segregation.   

Force busing has not ended! Minority middle and high school Red Clay students living in Wilmington Delaware are forced to ride the bus to suburban Red Clay middle and high schools. Why? Because Red Clay refuses to create traditional middle and high schools within the city of Wilmington. But yet even with empty seats in Red Clay city elementary schools, Red Clay continues to build new suburban elementary schools. They’ll  tell the public they are required to do so per the Neighborhood Schools Act. It seems the NSA benefits white suburban students more so than black Wilmington children.

Yea yea, Kilroy, don’t you know per Delaware’s Choice School Law students anywhere in the state can choose their school? Sound good on paper and when Governor Markell tells the world. However, without choice transportation there is an equity divide. If a parent doesn’t have adequate personal transportation needed as required by the School Choice law  to transport their child to and from feeder bus-stops within the Choice school, or directly to and from the Choice School, their child cannot participate.  Then there are the specific interest enrollment requirement for some charter and magnet schools that are based on intelligence and talent that must be proven during the application process. Folks our most neediest students many of high poverty minorities are locked out of  some of the most successful public funded schools.

I am here to tell you, the merger of Christina’s Wilmington Delaware  into Red Clay Consolidated School District will be a social train wreck! Will Red Clay create city “traditional”  middle and high schools?? HELL NO!  

Red Clay failed to meet federal achievement benchmarks in their city schools to a point a priority school plan was forced on them that give the Delaware Department of Education a direct say in day to day school operation. This the same DE DOE that had it’s charter schools unit implode causing a moratorium on new charter schools.

Folks Red Clay district leadership will cave to a blueprint re: takeover of Wilmington schools that will have no concrete plan and no defined sustainable funding streams. Red Clay will be knocking on local taxpayers’ door to fund another politically seeded agenda.

To Red Clay board members, I tell  you now is the time to put aside egos and personal differences and stand shoulder-to-shoulder and not agree to any MOU or plan that leads the way for a Red Clay takeover Christina schools unless a clear blueprint with funding is approved by the local taxpayers! What I am say, put the question to a referendum vote and if the public says no, let the local politicians take the heat! What is about to happen isn’t just a defining moment is of your board leadership but a defining moment for you as a person! And that position could haunt you the rest of your life! Please set the district leadership straight as to what is required! If there is push back then fire all the bastards! Always remember, the superintendent and district administrators  serve at the pleasure of  school board!    

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37 responses to “Red Clay School District takeover of Wilmington Christina schools does nothing to address de facto segregation

  1. Reblogged this on Exceptional Delaware and commented:
    You don’t have to sell me on this Kilroy. I’ve seen warning signs all over the road called Redistricting Highway. As I’ve dug into the history of segregation in Wilmington schools, I don’t see anything happening to stop this trend from continuing. I only see it getting worse, and not just in Wilmington. Something that is beginning to have an effect in Kent County is the World Immersion Program our oddball Governor brought forth. This is the one where kids go to a different school in their district to learn Spanish or Chinese. The districts and the DOE have already said “not a good fit for special needs kids.” What it is also doing is drawing the “smarter” kids to different schools and leaving the schools they left with more low-income, minority, and special needs students. What kills me on this one is the districts are doing it to themselves!!!! And the school boards lap it up like it’s the best thing in the world. I know Capital and Caesar Rodney are starting to feel the brunt of this decision, and I know Appo is heavily involved in this program as well.

    Why anyone is still listening to Markell is beyond me. I’m not going to sit here and say he cause all of this, but he has done nothing to stop it. In fact it has gotten progressively worse during his reign.

    The only thing I take issue with on your post is damning Red Clay over their priority schools designation. Don’t forget, this was solely based on standardized test scores, which we all know are not a measurable unit of true progress. Nobody talks about actual grades these kids get, or their ability to read at a peer level. There are so many different ways to measure student progress, but we seem to take the worst way imaginable.

    I truly believe we need a ton of replacements in our General Assembly, starting with Sokola and Jaques. You would have to be blind to not see who these two are hell-bent on destroying anything that is good about education. Here’s the scary part though with the Red Clay board saying no. The redistricting plans are already on the way. If Red Clay says no, and the State Board holds that power, and they can get the legislators to agree with what they come up with as an alternative, we are looking at an All-Charter Wilmington. And we know how well that worked out in places like New Orleans and Newark, NJ. I know, some will say that isn’t how SB 122 is written, but it also assumes Red Clay will just say yes and Christina will just automatically give the schools away. Much can happen between now and then!

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    • Publius e decere

      “I truly believe we need a ton of replacements in our General Assembly, starting with [Kowalko and Baumbach]. You would have to be blind to not see [that] these two are hell-bent on destroying anything that is good about education.”

      I could not agree more.

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • lastDEconservative

      ” … it has gotten progressively worse during his reign.”

      It always gets progressively worse under the reign of progressives. And always will, until discernment is regained, the progressives are condemned to the corner, and honest brokers with God fearing belief systems resume control.

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    • It always gets progressively worse under the reign of progressives.

      Since when have progressives “reigned” over anything? In our lifetimes progressives have always been a minority voice against “conservative” policies.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Your persistence in promoting a false narrative is always remarkable and not a little frightening, Mike A(linsky).

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  2. New Castle County schools have always been brutally segregated, except for a brief pause forced by the courts, until the districts figured out a way to resegregate. And Red Clay has always been the thought leader in resegregation as well as the leader by example.

    We like to focus on whoever the elected officials are at the time, but the reality is the drive for resegregation comes from the advantaged and status-seeking voters and parents of the districts. When Red Clay announced it would create a math and science charter school to attract the smartest kids, that sounded great! And when Red Clay wanted to build a performing arts ‘”magnet,” well, everybody loves a show, right? And entertainment stars are America’s royalty!

    But all magnets have two poles. When you build a magnet for the advantaged students, it leaves behind the rest in the dumping ground schools. As Kevin said: “What it is also doing is drawing the “smarter” kids to different schools and leaving the schools they left with more low-income, minority, and special needs students.” And that is the recipe for disintegrating schools.

    Very few could see the long game of what it meant to separate students by ability into completely different buildings. The disintegration began slowly, then accelerated when the banking boom hit Delaware and ever-more nouveau riche, status-conscious parents began demanding as much segregation as they could get in the new legal framework. And Red Clay answered the call, with CSW and CAB.

    The history is recorded in the Community News article “The Lost High Schools.” At one time, and I know this because I was there, many high schools had excellent theater departments, with plenty of participating students. If you had friends and relatives in other schools, each year you could count on attending productions at McKean, Dickinson, Mt. Pleasant, AI, and others. And they were good! I never laughed so hard as at the classic “High Button Shoes” put on by McKean. They actually built a two-story set of a hotel hallway for a doorway farce scene.

    But now we have Cab, and that’s great, right? Butn what happened to the others drama programs? And the other honors programs? They were on the wrong pole of the magnet. And now we are planning to turn up the power on the magnet to eleven.

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    • Publius e decere

      Stop dancing around the pole — what exactly do you expect parents to do? You have chosen what you think is best for your kids, and so has everyone else. No one seems to object to your choices, but you somehow object to the choices which other people make. Despite your asymmetry, it seems that the prevailing public will from this scrum is to have a variety of choice schools, to let people make those choices, and to grow the availability of popular choices in response to public demand.

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve come to learn choice is two different things to white parents and black parents. White parents use choice to get their kids away from black kids, and black parents use choice to get their kids away from violence from other black kids. Publius, you beat the choice drum so much, I have to wonder how you truly feel about African-americans. Same with all the choice mongers out there for the schools that are known to segregate by huge numbers….

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    • Publius e decere

      Shame on you for resorting to race in order to attack others.

      Parents use choice to seek the best education for their children. Full stop.

      “The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race.” This was said by Justice Roberts in 2007. When Justice Sotomayor challenged Justice Roberts on this, much in the way you are challenging choice-supporters now (but in her case with significantly more class than you have displayed here), Justice Roberts responded by saying “People can disagree in good faith on this issue, but it similarly does more harm than good to question the openness and candor of those on either side of the debate.” I agree with Justice Roberts’ sentiment in his reponse to Justice Sotomayor.

      Doubling down with bombast and personal attacks is certainly not a chapter from the Book Of Dale Carnegie. Try to respect the diversity of opinion on education matters which our public displays thorugh their choices and actions. The people on these blogs who take you on are doing so when you tell them that they are inherently wrong and must change. We assume that you are in control of this behavior and that you wilfully choose to display it. So we push back.

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • It’s not a choice if it isn’t a level playing field, and you know it Publius. If you don’t like the label, don’t wear the badge. You tout CSW as the greatest thing ever. But we both now how they got there, and those that are in charge and continue the charade are promoting racism. You don’t get to come down on me from your vantage point you hypocrite.

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    • lastDEconservative

      ” … those that are in charge and continue the charade are promoting racism,” said our interminably bitter wannabe fire starter.

      My goodness, Angos, you really are lobbing incendiary bombs from your last refuge today. I’m trying to picture you telling Merv that he is a racist. (Cue the Jeopardy theme) Can’t do it.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “We assume that you are in control of this behavior and that you wilfully choose to display it.”

      Fab-u-lous line!

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    • Publius e decere

      If I have “touted CSW as the greatest thing ever” well I certainly can’t recall it and if I did it was a rare occurence. Nor have I touted any other all-choice public school as “the greatest thing ever” unless I did so one in a blue moon in a knee jerk reaction to a nutty anti-choice comment on a blog. Like yours. Maybe you could cite my massive occurences of saying “[XYZ School] is the greatest ever” theme with examples to back your point. Good luck. Oh, Marquess of Queenbury Rules … no inferences, you have to cite me saying “[XYZ School] is the best ever” or something close with the name of the school in it.

      If I have named successful schools, I am more likely to have named Newark Charter School. They have a K-12 integrated program consistently turning out high-learning scholars. And with most kids entering their program at the K level, all it really takes is “application” and then luck that you can get in within the state-imposed limit on enrollment. Have you ever spolken with Greg Meese about this? Spoke, not taunted. He is a very thoughtful guy, and he would readily accept a ceiling-less legislative evironment to expand (further) his school’s success program. I think it is naysayers (such as yourself) who are afraid of such a challenge. Just keep in mind that it is the legislators and the DOE who are limiting opportunity to attend NCS. Not the school.

      As for “those in charge promoting racism” I will note for this blog record that you are an outsized voice (of one) in labeling things by race. Including accusations of people based on their education choices, choices which are made devoid of race considerations. You might consider that your pre-judging profiling is not much different that that of various police officers around the country. When your victims can’t breathe, they kick you back.

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • Of course I’m in full control of my behavior. Are you? Someone makes a comment on here, and you feel it is your duty as the choice deputy to come to the defense of the almighty “choice” and you do the attacking. Lest you forget who you are, many of us know, and with that knowledge comes a certain finesse in what so many of us say to you. You may be fooling some of the people on here, and it doesn’t matter if your name is William, Aaron or whatever, we know who the real McCoy is and what YOU represent. So get off your high horse and suck it up big man.
      And way to react to something you perceive as “racist” by bringing up something regarding police which is a hot-button race issue in the media nowadays. Guilty conscience getting to you there Publius?
      Maybe need to talk about racism more often so we can weed out those who want to deal with it away from the mire and muck of those who think “choice” in education has nothing to do with race. Cause if it didn’t, I wouldn’t be having this conversation with you right now.
      LastDE, nobody really cares what you have to say anymore, you are just kind of here…

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    • Publius e decere

      And there lies the difference. You dismiss LDC as he does you. He uses a bit more class and sophistication, for what it is worth.

      You can spew accusations all day and still be wrong. Which in this case, you are. I suggest that you re-focus on how to improve things without taking things away from other people. Until they, you are just another overbearing presumptive ideologue. LDC, Publius, MRyder and more … we don’t cry for you to join us, we only ask that you stop asking for us to unquestionalby agree with you and we disagree with your stance that disagreement with you contintutues apostasy and racism. Your accusations reveal the real you.

      Your playng of the card is abhorrent. You are down quite a few notches because of it. Small, and now inconsiderable.

      I’m glad to see your acknowledgement that you are in full control of your behavior. Thus no need to treat you with kid gloves.

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • He is a very thoughtful guy, and he would readily accept a ceiling-less legislative evironment to expand (further) his school’s success program.

      I hear Christina is looking to unload a bunch of high-poverty schools…maybe they just need a little of that special charter sauce, hmm?

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    • it seems that the prevailing public will from this scrum is to have a variety of choice schools, to let people make those choices, and to grow the availability of popular choices in response to public demand.

      That’s just a bunch of sanctimonious argle-bargle to justify a policy that takes from the public good so that one might have greater advantage for oneself. Is there a word that means “disingenuous” but simultaneously conveys the deceitfulness and hateful dishonesty of a statement?

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    • I’ve never needed to be treated with kid gloves Publius. I’m my own man and never claimed to be otherwise (unless you count my JLF days, which I shed like an old sweater). So I guess you, Last and M. Ryder seem to think you “own” the comments of Kilroys and I can “join” you. Your arrogance knows no bounds, does it? The only reason I usually come here is to see articles Kilroy posts. But your comments beg for a response. And I’m pretty sure the other parts of the “Kilroy’s Trio” can speak for themselves.
      I won’t beat around the bush, I’ve always felt that you had a bit of racism to you, I just danced around it for the past year and a quarter. Now I’m saying it flat-out. What I’m not saying is you are a KKK, confederate flag pick-up driver racist. It’s a more overt thing. I’ve never had a problem with choice, as long as it was equitable. But it isn’t, and the way it is set up now with CSW, Sussex Academy, and yes, some magnets and vo-tech districts, it is not an equal choice mechanism. I have never once heard you say “the way it is set up is kind of jacked up, maybe we should take a look at that”. You DEFEND it. To parents of minorities and special needs students, that’s like putting up a big sign that says “not welcome here”. That’s the heart of my issue with you. I don’t hear MRyder and Last beating the choice drum every chance they get. At least own what the inherent issues are with choice if you truly want people to join in. And do something about it. Until then it’s like a skip on a 45 where you hear the same verse over and over again.

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    • Publius e decere

      Thank you, “Ground Hog Day” Ohlandt. When McCarthy didn’t like what he saw he called it “communist”. When you don’t like what you see you call it “racist”. But you seem to be the only one here making decisions based on race. I could point out your race-conscious hypocrisy, but it is like a barnside target for the nearsighted. I’m not interested in atacking you (wow, what an iinnovation) I’m interested in frustrating your unreasonable and highly personal attacks on everyone who reasonably disagrees with you. Thank you for making it clear that you are in control of you attacks, it makes it so much easier to reject you and to intellectually box your ears.

      Enjoy you self-satified podium. It is indeed “exceptional”. When you are iseriously nterested in making the school system better, weigh back in.

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • And when reasonable, intelligent, and concerned citizens call it discrimination, cherry-picking, and segregation, Publius calls it choice.

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    • And I have a great idea for making school systems better in Delaware: how about we give equity to ALL schools. Meaning no placement tests before enrollment, a REAL lottery, and charters don’t take excess funds from taxpayers. And how about we stop judging schools that are left with the most vulnerable students because certain charters WON’T take them or counsel them out. How about we stop making standardized tests the “measure of proficiency” and treat students as the individuals they are in ALL schools and not a data point or a test score. But here’s my best idea: Publius goes before the board at CSW, Sussex Academy and Red Clay and demands all “choice” schools adhere to this. Because obviously you are some man of influence with your big words and know-it-all speaking for the people vibe. When charters play on the same level playing field, we can have an intelligent conversation. The difference between you and I is I’m on the side of justice, but you are on the side of the top of the heap and screw anyone who falls down along the way. I’ve known people like you all my life, and they didn’t impress me then, and they do nothing for me now. What burns me the most is when you disparage and condescend to those who speak what somewhere in that witty mind of yours you most likely know to be true but your ego won’t let it come to the forefront.

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    • lastDEconservative

      My, oh, my, Angos. You are like Hillary, the more you speak the deeper you dig yourself in. You really need to get an alternate meme for this racism kick you’re on. “Fire” in a crowded theatre is unbecoming, let alone taboo.

      Since you dragged me into the argument, let me make it clear, this being America and all, choice is always the answer, properly tempered with the fire of competition, and free to make its way in the open marketplace. I doubt that either Coke’s or Pepsi’s quality or taste would be very good if it weren’t for the other. In the case of govt schooling (not education), the absence of competition and market forces (and “credible” (cough) voices of criticism) keep “improvement” out there as a gossamer target that the system has always and shall forever thwart, with malice aforethought … and the perversion of that is even worse when you consider that the system (union, educrats, the elected) gets more money, more restarts, more do-overs, and more forgiveness in the face of never achieving success in the least!

      Even the perception of (the smallest) charter success draws parents and students like moths to flame. (Did you catch “perception?” For the sake of argument, I’ll let your pathetic claim of the absence of charter success stand). And the perverse, non-market, govt monopoly system reacts how? With attacks! Excuses! Not more or less sugar or caramel, tracking evolving taste buds, not a new market driven sales and satisfaction program, oh, no, with vulgar attacks and cheap, bombastic, incredible rhetoric.

      Come to the light.

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    • Last, I don’t mind competition, as long as it is healthy and the rules are enjoyed by all, as well as the benefits. This “choice” mentality is destroying our education system as we speak. The ONLY reason Publius has been on a tear about charters, magnets and vo-tech is because he wants them to succeed. Nothing wrong with that, but he doesn’t want them to succeed for students benefit. He wants EXPANSION baby! But there are only a finite number of students in Delaware. So for anything to give the illusion of success, something has to have something taken away from it. That isn’t competition, that’s a death race.

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    • lastDEconservative

      You really are out there on an island alone, poor KO. Who, really now, who does not want choice, of their own making? And as a corollary, who (in their right minds) will prefer for themselves the choices you have decided that only you can make for them? Of course choice should expand in the govt monopoly schooling (not education) system, until every last participant has chosen!

      Of course, there’s a pointer to the dirty little secret why the leviathan controls both the amount and constitution of the choices IT ALONE makes available to the great unwashed. Choice, carried to its conclusion, will mark the death of the leviathan and all its hangers on, sycophants, barnacles, and leeches.

      I choose Pepsi, FedEx, heavy foreign v-8 powered sedans, ( ) Church (not gonna open that can of worms with you), cuffed slacks, lots of lawn, etc., all of which I pay for once and done. I want education, I have to pay a second time because the first time I paid, the coerced absence of a marketplace ensured that my return would be abysmal and non-refundable. Yeah, as you said, let’s let the competition rules apply to all, equally. You really should get on with that.

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    • I don’t disagree with you there Last. I disagree with Publius’ style of “choice”. I’ll let him fill you in on his racially biased method, because I just can’t make him understand. I’m a Pepsi drinker, but the fact that Coke is out there makes Pepsi a choice for me. I prefer alternative music to country, so that is my choice. Life is about choices. But when the odds are stacked for a certain group of individuals based on intelligence, race, and physical ability, that’s not choice. It’s discrimination. I believe in church and the separation of church and state, and believe we will all be judged based on what we do on this Earth. I will be paying for a 3rd educational outcome for my own son in the fall because that’s the way the cards were dealt, and not favorably for him. We are more alike than you realize Last.

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    • I prefer any alternative to country.

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  3. Mike’s objection is to the choices that the state (in its various forms) is offering, not to the parents who make legal choices within that landscape. Lots of individuals would prefer to circumvent laws that are made for the public good if they were permitted to, b/c these laws constrain individual freedoms in the public interest (labor & env’tal regulations, for example). His point, well articulated above, is that once parents were given the opportunity to segregate their kids from less advantaged (and often less well-behaved, less academically and artistically cultivated students) while still retaining public funds for their children’s education, many took this opportunity quite happily. No surprise there; this would happen in most places where the state made such an offer. But it isn’t in the public interest; that is, these policies do not advance the goal of a well-educated, employable population across the board that is the justification for a tax-funded school system. Those public interests are better served by more equitably distributed public school opportunity. Families with resources who are unsatisfied with the resulting public system would remain free to educate their children through some other means, such as their own labor or by paying tuition to a tutor or privately organized school. This basic compact is what our state leaders should return to. But that would require them to act against the interests of families now benefitting from the inequities established since 1995 (those with children at CSW, Cab, NCS, Odyssey, DMA, Sussex Acad and Tech, etc.). That is a well-organized, vocal group of voters with paid lobbyists working diligently on their behalf. It is not likely that enough DE legislators, DOE staff or appointed board members will have the courage to reverse the current inequities, on behalf of the majority of tax-payers but against the interests of that group, without another court order requiring them to do so. I don’t foresee that happening soon–the ACLU’s OCR complaint, still under federal review, was one modest attempt to draw in outside authority that could weigh against well-organized interests in Dover. But an actual federal court case by a disadvantaged party may be the only adequate solution. When DE ignored Brown, the judiciary waited 24 yrs to weigh in–and that solution precipitated the reaction we see now (seg. via charters and magnets). Not a great model.

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    • Publius e decere

      ” … public interests are better served by more equitably distributed public school opportunity.” I’m glad you included the concept of opportunity. Maybe you could elaborate on why the existence and the practices of these schools are limiting opportunity.

      I also noticed that you omitted Conrad from your list — is there something which Conrad is doing (along the lines of opportunity) which the other public schools on your list are not doing? Anything we can learn from Aspira? Anything we can learn from the Freire model (proven in PA, embryonic in DE)?

      I can start this exchange off by saying that the schools which you list, plus Conrad and plus the public votech high schools, all are operating at full capacity and with substantial waiting lists and in nearly every case are operating under enrollment ceiling contraints which are set by the legislature and which are intrinsically and effectively limiting opportunity for numerous families and their students in Delaware to be able to choose the school which they feel is best for them.

      It might also be worth considering that the system of district-managed elementary and middle schools is turning out a persistent achievement-gap in proficiency. When those districts are openly challenged on that record, their spokespeople can not seem to humbly examine themselves to remedy the gap. If we remain focused on service (or in this case, disservice) of the public interest, shouldn’t we be reinventing these public school systems to close that gap? And isn’t that a more effective way to address your complaint about certain public secondary schools?

      Publius

      Liked by 1 person

    • Publics, I have no objection to expanding the highly desired schools to take everyone who expresses interest in them. That should have been done years ago, along with assurances that admitted kids could not be dismissed for poor achievement or behavior any more readily than they can be from traditional public schools. Also careful monitoring of any significant demographic discrepancy (% to be determined by law, in relation to census data) to ensure that barriers to entry are not being imposed on the basis of ability, wealth, or behavior. Given the demand for alternate public schools, this approach seems like the clear solution–and it might yield a marginally better administered public Ed. system than what we have now. But it would also make the desired schools genuinely public schools, with student enrollments fairly similar to what the districts see. Given how unlike public schools several of them are now (with regard to student enrollment and retention), it’s a fair hypothesis that they would change along various measures (student achievement, disciplinary stats) to more closely mirror current data of the schools that they replace–and some families enthusiastic about their current charters would probably opt for private schools, as many did a decade ago. But returning charters to the original concept of being merely public schools with administrative flexibility from district supervisors is sensible, and might well yield a stronger public system. That’s not what we have now, in the charter landscape. Even the least segregating ones, like Aspira, return kids with behavioral issues to the district ( this is what Aspira’s principal told us, when we toured as prospective parents–it’s what led us to dismiss that option). Those inequities in the public system are what need to be corrected. Premium public services for the savvy, wealthy or lucky with residual services, increasingly stripped of resources, for the rest is not acceptable in a democratic system–certainly not w/o a significant tax hike on the “premium” recipients, to ensure adequate resources for the less privileged schools/students.

      The as-yet unanswered question is whether CSW, with 30x its current low-income population, would be clearly better thanMcKean, or NCS with 9x its current low-income population would be superior to Newark and Glasgow, etc. They might be. On the other hand, I strongly suspect that the hysteria about getting one’s child into them (and out of the others) would diminish once the student populations were more comparable. That is the magic ingredient, at present.

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    • “Those inequities in the public system are what need to be corrected.”
      Can you hear the people “turning the dials” to correct the inequalities you describe? Are these people qualified to turn the dials? Do they have everyone’s interests in mind or just yours? Are your interests more important than mine, and who will be the qualified individual to make that judgement? When you turn the dials to what you think will correct the inequalities will you also be turning the dial of unintended consequences? Given the fact they are unintended, will the circumstances really be better and for whom? Kind of like Obamacare; great if you never paid or worked for healthcare, not so good for the majority who are now paying more. It was called the “Affordable” Care Act right? Is it more “affordable” for all or just a select few who weren’t really paying for it anyway? Or do we just need to turn more dials to balance the equation further? Therein lies the problem with your hypothesis of controlling who goes to what school, who oversees it and who determines who is entitled to the benefits. The equation can never be balanced.

      “to ensure that barriers to entry are not being imposed on the basis of ability, wealth, or behavior”. I suppose you are opposed to higher end restaurants, country clubs, Doctorate degrees, professional sports teams, and cheer-leading squads since they all have barriers of one form or another. Heaven forbid we have Professors who display the ability and desire to digest and apply Brazilian history and technology. Anyone should be granted that degree regardless of interest. Anyone should be able to eat in an expensive restaurant without paying. Anyone should be able to play on a professional team, tryouts are discriminatory. Anyone should be able to be a cheer leader, being overweight, mute and unable to perform the gymnastic maneuvers should not stop them. Anyone should be able to enter any school, curse the teacher out and disrupt (steal) the educational opportunities of the rest of the class. Why would anyone want to deny them these opportunities? Maybe because it does a disservice to those who worked for the opportunities or made the effort to learn what needed to be learned to have the opportunity, or put forth the effort to create the desired environment. Little Red Hens not allowed???

      “But returning charters to the original concept of being merely public schools with administrative flexibility from district supervisors …” THIS WAS NEVER THE SOLE PURPOSE OR EDICT of charters and to post it as such is intellectually disingenuous. It is also not why parents pressed for and Legislators passed and approved charter schools.

      You’re offended by the thought that parents seeking alternatives have been given options that, for whatever reason other parents have not sought or put themselves in a position to access. You’re offended that public monies would be used to educate some students outside the normal channels because not everyone is capable, willing, or agreeable to the conditions of those educational opportunities. I am going out on the limb here to assume that you would tolerate other schools if they simply were “just like” what is already available in our TPS’s? (Everyone gets to buy a Dodge 200 car, you shouldn’t be allowed to choose a Chevy Malibu, or Toyota Corolla. ???) Does that really make logical sense to you? No it doesn’t, but it does support “your” narrative to dismantle charters by removing their ability to create educationally desired environments. Wouldn’t the more logical conclusion be that our TPS’s need to adopt some of the methodologies and requirements of these alternatives and partition educational opportunities commensurate with their students abilities or behavior? I do not anticipate that happening anytime soon. It is more socially and politically tolerable to have parents double pay to get good education (or get an alternative car with an added value tax) in a private school rather than allow some public schools to offer appropriate education (allow the sale of a Chevy Malibu at the same price), in an environment, where social and behavioral dysfunctions are not the main problem of educators(who are not trained to be social service counselors, crisis management, or dysfunctional behavior modifiers).

      I’ll end with a post from someone else contradicting what you seem to be advocating for with making all schools “equal”.
      http://www.scifiwright.com/2008/06/if-everyone-is-super-no-one-will-be/

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    • M Ryder, you did say “unintended consequences”, didn’t you? Where have I heard that term in the past couple months? Which makes your previous comments even more implausible being I had never once mentioned a certain company prior to that. You make PERFECT sense now!

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  4. Kevin: “I’ve come to learn choice is two different things to white parents and black parents. White parents use choice to get their kids away from black kids, and black parents use choice to get their kids away from violence from other black kids. ” – Huh? So how did you conclude this? It couldn’t be that white parents want to keep their kids away from violence? My son goes to a vo-tech school with almost identical percentage of black students as white. I choose the school for several reasons but one of the top reasons was that it has a reputation for low violence. Isn’t there enough racism out there without you making it up?

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    • Yes, it was a “huh” choice of words. Something to make people think. Look at Wilmington…the schools there are far too segregated. I was mostly being sarcastic, but take a look at the charters in Wilmington. They are either predominantly white, or predominantly black. That doesn’t happen by design, that happens by choice. So we can sit here and pretend the world in education is just perfect for some and not so good for others and blame it on those horrible district schools as the choicers pulls their kids out leaving the district schools to deal with the fallout of those decisions, or we can collectively find a way to fix it. I’m not going to pretend I have all the answers to how we can fix this mess, but meaningful change will only happen if we embrace the honesty of how it got to this point.

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  5. oh I get it. Kevin’s ignoring me LOL.

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  6. Pencadermom

    Kevin: “The ONLY reason Publius has been on a tear about charters, magnets and vo-tech is because he wants them to succeed. Nothing wrong with that, but he doesn’t want them to succeed for students benefit. He wants EXPANSION baby! But there are only a finite number of students in Delaware. So for anything to give the illusion of success, something has to have something taken away from it.”
    I, too, want them to expand. Any school that has a waiting list should expand, including vo-tech who turn kids away. And keep expanding until there is no waiting list. I guess I don’t agree with your theory of your illusion of success. To use LastDels analogy, do you feel both Coke and Pepsi are successful?

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    • Publius e decere

      Thanks Pencadermom. I think Kevin means well but he gets his logic twisted at times and in turn he forgets The People. A casualty of tilting at windmills 24/7.

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