No tax referendums required for votechs and now Delaware Tech wants in! So much for needs based funding for K-12

Tax increase would fund Delaware Tech infrastructure Matthew Albright, The News Journal

Some lawmakers want to raise property taxes statewide to pay for infrastructure improvements at Delaware Technical Community College that school leaders say are sorely needed and long overdue.

Sen. Harris McDowell, who co-chairs the budget-writing Joint Finance Committee, has filed a bill that would create a new property tax. It would start in July 2017 at 1.9 cents per $100 of assessed property value.

Delaware Tech’s Board of Trustees could then choose to increase those taxes. It would not be able to raise the tax to more than five cents per $100 over the next five years and would be limited to a maximum of 10 cents per $100.

“This is the responsible thing for the state to do – to invest in our community college and in our economy,” McDowell said in a news release. “Passage of this bill will finally provide a long-term solution to the college’s long-standing deferred maintenance problem while boosting Delaware’s economy in the short term.”

So add more funds to Delaware Tech using a non-referendum process like for votechs! But what about the call for needs based funding for Delaware’s k-12 schools?

Just another slap in the face to K-12 at-risk student in dire need of smaller class sizes!

$420,000.00  a year for Delaware Tech’s president.

I know Delaware Tech needs to expand but how fair is to ask school district be beg the taxpayers for K-12 funding and ask them to sit by and say nothing about this proposed legislation? 

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14 responses to “No tax referendums required for votechs and now Delaware Tech wants in! So much for needs based funding for K-12

  1. Publius e decere

    At $420K per year (a half-million if you consider the value of benefits and pension contributions) the leadership needs to be a bit more sophisticated and skilled in making their case. Any donkey can show up to a barn door and kick for taxes to be levied without the will of the people paying them. It takes a leader to build the public will to support the school. So far, I see no such leadership.

    I would suggest that they start with tuition. Shouldn’t the people using these post-secondary schools put up the lion’s share?

    Publius

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Shouldn’t the people using these post-secondary schools put up the lion’s share?”

      Sir, you forget yourself! These are the barely able and barely willing, unlike -your- friends and associates. Since when should the latter not willingly pay the freight for the former?

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  2. Another property tax is just another nail in Delaware’s coffin. What’s wrong with paying for capital improvements with General Fund money? Nothing! In fact, all K-12 Referendums should be repealed. The General Fund should pay for all K-12 school expenses. Why? Because we would finally get some degree of open, transparent and accountable governance. Also, it would leave money in the hands of the people who earned it to spend and grow their community. So tired of seeing School Districts with salary and benefits ~80% of revenue. I know, it’s for the children.

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    • lastDEconservative

      ” … leave money in the hands of the people who earned it to spend and grow their community.”

      Good afternoon, Mr. Mann. Your jacket is just back from the cleaners; let’s slip it on. The sleeves? Oh, don’t fret yourself, the extra 18″ of length and the belts and buckles are all the latest rage in fashion! You’re gonna love it! C’mon, let’s get this on and go have some oatmeal.

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  3. What’s deltechs balance sheet? How much do they make in tuition? Free money to deltech? I don’t think so.

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  4. Love it… IF Delaware TECH can do it… it is obvious that we could fund Charter Schools statewide the same way…. Tax the rich. use that money to fund charters… No property tax money should go to charters period… It is a waste of property owners money… Public schools do better with less…

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    • lastDEconservative

      Meanwhile, back in the alternate universe … on the mirror planet, down the rabbit hole and in the Bizzaro realm thereof (h/t Seinfeld) … public schools do better with less. Tax the rich (more).

      kavips, the Pepsi machine of the blogosphere. Press the button, the same thing comes out every time. Gotta love her.

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  5. lastDEconservative

    Well, it’s either prop DelTech up or tear UD down. Uh, oh. I hope nobody’s listening.

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  6. john kowalko

    In the BOND BILL Go to page A 6-7 Polytech HS gets $4,225,000 cap improvements with local share of $2,275,000 local share sans referendum.

    3) NCC Vo-Tech Howard HS gets $13,174,000 from bond with local share of $7,093,000 again sans referendum because of bills we passed allowing them to up the tax without referendum.

    4) Now the denouement: Christina District has aging, decaying buildings and teacher, para and other staff cuts because it cannot get a referendum passed.

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    • Publius e decere

      Those schools without referendums are Vo-techs in both cases. A different situation altogether. And one which actually SHOULD be subject to referendum, not encouraged by expanding the loss of the voters’ franchise.

      In Christina, voters used the power of the referendum to resoundingly disapproved of Christina’s quality, waste and pugilistic stance of nearly everything. “Decaying buildings” ?? Oh, you mean the gargantuan industrial building it bought a decade ago and has sat empty ever since at taxpayer expense? Or maybe you mean the half-empty high school buildings at Christiana and Glasgow, both of which will be even emptier if (when) WEAC prevails and Christina no longer has its city district. Oh, and aren’t these two high school building the same ones which were the subject of a recent New Journal article about how Christina is going to spend (very) long term money on energy projects at these two building with something like 25-year paybacks?

      It looks to me like Christina still does not get it. Sell the industrial building. Do NOT make quarter-century investments in bothe high school buildings when it is very likely that one will have to be abandoned before long. And while they are at it, they should stop treating charter schools and net-choice-out as some kind of apostasy; rather, these are the choice of their own taxpaying people.

      Respect the will of the people in the aggregate, not just the “fiery” ones. The public wants quality and they seem to be finding it in increasing numbers in charter school or in district schools outside of Christina.

      Publius

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    • lastDEconservative

      I’ll see denouement and raise you disingenuous and egregious: “Christina District has aging, decaying buildings and teacher, para and other staff cuts because it cannot get a referendum passed.” As in, this is one of the most egregious examples of being disingenuous I’ve ever seen.

      As if the — sudden — (pay attention, denizens — sudden) absence of a — future — incremental — increase in income (did I mention -future- ?) was the cause of the — present — (are you paying attention?) conditions cited … NOT the decades of neglect, idiocratic decisions, federal and legislative meddling, pathetically poor, but always politically correct management, untold barrels of money poured into Next Big Things, just to name a few.

      There is no denouement to the overarching story; those in charge of the destruction will continue to twist the long established path, parse the words, and scale the failure in such a way as to ensure SELF preservation and (snap to now, watch this next word) CONTROL at a terrible cost. The Never Ending Story, more or less. And that there is a denizenry out there that listens to such claptrap and mutters, “yeah, what he said” ensures the perpetuation of the destruction.

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    • Mr. K,
      Compare graduation rates, college readiness, discipline ratings and financial resource management of Howard and Polytech to that of CSD schools. The comparison will very obviously identify that “results” or “educational success” is a reasonable justification for expenditure. Failure, lack of discipline, constituent abuse, and financial mismanagement do not. Charters guilty of the failures should be shut down. Where’s the similar mechanism for our public schools? Where’s the immediate recall of poorly performing governors or other elected officials especially ones bent on specially interests instead of the greater good.

      Go ahead, respond with an insult and no actual answer. Make your constituent’s day. You will only reinforce that your arguments are false and your childish name calling equates to behavior of a bully.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullying
      “Bullying may also result from a genetic predisposition or a brain abnormality in the bully.”

      We the uninformed (mislead by the truth deficient), selfish (taxpaying), unenlightened(kool aid refusers), self indulgent (anti-politically correct), anonymous (unelected private citizens on a blog) await your words of wisdom (or not).

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    • Publius e decere

      Midnight Ryder,

      The Repp has no answers. He has no official standing with the school system, which is why he yells and insults so much trying to establish his influence by transference. All he offers is a weathervane (which apparently only detects microclimates near his house) and a megaphone which apparently only has one speed and volume. He offers free hair-advice but most of us will take a pass on that. Tonight he is probably bouncing around in Dover believing that an 11th-hour “fiery” allnighter is synonymous with “contributing to the public good”.

      Rest assuried that the Repp’s Fringe is withering as we speak. Sensible people statewide are making their views known,. We may not win every debate, but common sense will win the day. The Repp will, and should, retire as a museum curiosity before long.

      Publius

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    • Publius, I heard all those “sensible people” vote no on a bill that would give charter schools the financial transparency we all know they desperately need. Every single one of them in the House. I’ve always been a “middle” kind of guy, but with the actions I saw last night of the “sensibles” along with those who do not call themselves that but actually are, it shows. And while we can attack “The Repp”, you would be surprised how many of his ideas make logical and fiscal sense. I think “The Repp” will be the first to admit his shortcomings once you get to actually know him, but underneath that is a man who truly believes in what he speaks of. It isn’t about financial gain, or an illusion of power, it’s about people. And those people, I heard them speak a lot today, and more of them seem to be on his side of things than the “sensibles”, some of which actually voted against the budget last night. So try to think about why someone like “The Repp” continues to appear before the House, year after year, while the “sensibles” trade their beliefs for the scraps the “have too much power non-sensibles have”. They can talk all they want, but they lack the drive to sensibly make change. It is too much all or nothing, but then at the last minute, let’s make a sandwich out of moldy leftovers. I believe the next election will hold the true barometer of which way the wind blows in this state, and many legislators need to get on the right side of issues now before they drown in their thirst for power. Either way, it will be fascinating to watch, and very foreboding if the status quo remains…

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