Is U.S. Sec of Ed Duncan saying Feds might step in if Delaware Legislators Vote yes re: H.B.#50

As opt-out numbers grow, Arne Duncan says feds may have to step in by Patrick Wall on April 21, 2015 6:38 pm Chalkbeat New York

Those estimates suggesting that more than 15 percent of students refused to take the tests have raised questions about the consequences for districts. Federal law requires all students in grades three to eight to take annual tests, and officials have said districts could face sanctions if fewer than 95 percent of students participate. On Tuesday, when asked whether states with many test boycotters would face consequences, Duncan said he expected states to make sure districts get enough students take the tests.

“We think most states will do that,” Duncan said during a discussion at the Education Writers Association conference in Chicago. “If states don’t do that, then we have an obligation to step in.”

(hat tip to Nancy Willing)

Advertisements

17 responses to “Is U.S. Sec of Ed Duncan saying Feds might step in if Delaware Legislators Vote yes re: H.B.#50

  1. So based on Feds DOE over view where do they get that they can bully a state legislature and citizens about what’s best for our students?
    ” Education is primarily a State and local responsibility in the United States. It is States and communities, as well as public and private organizations of all kinds, that establish schools and colleges, develop curricula, and determine requirements for enrollment and graduation. The structure of education finance in America reflects this predominant State and local role. Of an estimated $1.15 trillion being spent nationwide on education at all levels for school year 2011-2012, a substantial majority will come from State, local, and private sources. This is especially true at the elementary and secondary level, where about 87.7 percent of the funds will come from non-Federal sources.

    That means the Federal contribution to elementary and secondary education is about 10.8 percent, which includes funds not only from the Department of Education (ED) but also from other Federal agencies, such as the Department of Health and Human Services’ Head Start program and the Department of Agriculture’s School Lunch program.

    Although ED’s share of total education funding in the U.S. is relatively small, ED works hard to get a big bang for its taxpayer-provided bucks by targeting its funds where they can do the most good. This targeting reflects the historical development of the Federal role in education as a kind of “emergency response system,” a means of filling gaps in State and local support for education when critical national needs arise.”

    Like

    • lastDEconservative

      “So based on Feds DOE over view where do they get that they can bully a state legislature and citizens about what’s best for our students?”

      Welcome back, Rip Van Wolf. Sleep well?

      Liked by 1 person

  2. But yet they will threaten to cut those funds if the little students they profess to care about so much don’t give them the data they so desperately want. Arne Duncan can bite me. Districts will sue the hell out of the US DOE if they try to take one penny of that funding away.

    Like

  3. john kowalko

    Hey Arne,
    With all due and earned respect, “go bleep yourself”
    Delaware State Representative John Kowalko

    Like

  4. kilroysdelaware

    Cutting Title 1 funding will only hurt poor children! They won’t do it!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. They can’t, not based on opt-out. The school has to be the one to opt the student out, not anything to do with parent opt out in the law.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. kilroysdelaware

    Duncan will make the threat and Markell will pour the Kool-aid to state legislators to make them think Duncan will go through with it! 2016 election is not that far away and many legislators will be sitting ducks (politically) Parents are getting better organized and Delaware PTA is waking from the Markell induced coma!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. It’s just a contract. We signed on to get the cash without worrying about the consequences. Get the Fed money and Fed control out of our schools.
    (Boy, I ssound like a Texas politician there)

    Like

  8. Joanne Christian

    Feds stepping in? Oh please, I’ll host Arne Duncan at my home so taxpayers aren’t picking up the tab for his accomodations to shanghai this state and ed policies further. John, could you bring the hemlock? I think we’ll have plenty of crow from others. Kilroy…..please cue the music, and Kevin…..BIG nametags. OK ? Thanks!

    PS Rep. Kowalko, kindly handle the Master of Ceremonies duties, as I’ll be in the kitchen cleaning up this mess. Many thanks.

    Like

  9. Publius e decere

    Well, with KO’s “Biting” commentary and JK’s “Bleep”-as-a-verb, I’m sure they will (not) get far with the Secretary of Education. The Feds give money with up-front stated conditions, and it seems like some posters here want to take and keep the money without the inconveniece of adhering to the conditions. Tsk tsk. But no surprise.

    These tests are part of the schooling system of the state, there is no a la carte principle in compulsory schooling. Tests assess mastery. Standardizd tests eliminate the cross-classroom and cross-school bias of individual-teacher-decided tests. Standardized tests for all students gives the public valuable data needed for the public to identify achievement gaps and schoolwide results for itself without state or district editorializing or homogenizing of data. The public deserves this information, without the bias and inefficiencies which opting-out introduces.

    Straighten up and fly right. Take the test.

    Publius

    Like

  10. Not much different than the Federal NHTSA mandating speed limits, or helmet laws if the State wants federal funds.

    The disagreement with the State educational dept’s acceptance of the funds is they (Coach and Curley) signed on without knowing (or caring) what was required. DSEA, Districts and DOE were force fed the RTTT and Standardized accountability tests for the funds. “Celebrated” the funds and then promptly bent the districts over the barrel to pay up via unknown, unproven, unqualified tests. It is quite the dysfunctional process, no?

    I would argue that there are major conflicts with the current tests and major corporations who created them, funneling large amounts of money into a specific political party to push it all through. With a one party State aligned with the current federal administration, it is working. Surprize, Surprize, Surprize. The incompleteness of the tests, the recent objections by DSEA, the resistance of the districts and parents is not unfounded but to your point;
    “The Feds give money with up-front stated conditions, and it seems like some posters here want to take and keep the money without the inconveniece of adhering to the conditions. Tsk tsk.”
    The up front “stated” conditions were not truly “up front”. The state, the other associations, and legislators who failed to demand the “up front” conditions be clear and proven should have been at the forefront. They weren’t because: they wanted the money. They got it and Gomer’s words are all to appropriate.

    Votes matter, policy matters, associations matter and ethics matter. They just don’t seem to matter when they need to; before pulling the lever for qualified candidates, with sound policies, sound associations and sound ethics.

    Who’s going to vote for Beau with the invisible persona and rather unsubstantial record? Delacrats, that’s who and when they don’t like his policies who will they complain to? They better be complaining to the mirror-HARD.

    Like

  11. john kowalko

    Fublius,
    The DOE agreed to these terms with the Feds, without the General Assembly’s approval ergo the reason for HB #108. That’s no JOKO
    John Kowalko

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Steven Fackenthall

    Publius, how does clicking a button assess mastery? That’s what these tests are, some of which students may take their time and try their best while others might not. If the tests were purely for what they were meant to be, student evaluation, then fine. The fact that these tests punish schools that don’t score well, that’s where it goes too far. And before you lay down a snappy one-liner, please visit a traditional school and talk to some teachers about it.

    Like

    • lastDEconservative

      ” … these tests punish schools that don’t score well … ”

      While I have M’s clear minded pithiness on my mind, I’ll ask, Prithee, sir, should the schools be judged at all?

      Like

    • Publius e decere

      — So Sez The Steve —

      The CCSS and the SBAC have been developed with the active participation and input of educators, professionals, state governments, contributors, foundations, and interest(ed) groups — all aimed at raising the bar for American students, Your fatuous reduction of this seminal revolution to the pejorative of “clicking a button” says alot about your lack of constructive participation. If the Delaware system frustrates you try moving to a more like-minded environment — like Georgia?

      Publius

      Like

    • lastDEconservative

      Hang on there Pub. You didn’t mention that you visited a TPS and discussed button clicking with some teachers. I’m confident you took your marching orders to heart. Others may need to hear you say it.

      Like