Baumbach goes it alone on H.R.#6 re: Social Promotion! Yep the time has come to stop handing out hollow diplomas

148th General Assembly
House Resolution # 6

Primary Sponsor:

Baumbach

CoSponsors:

{ NONE…}

Introduced on :

03/17/2015

Long Title:

EXTENDING THE DEADLINE FOR A TASK FORCE TO STUDY AND PROVIDE ALTERNATIVE SOLUTIONS TO SCHOOL RETENTION AND SOCIAL PROMOTION.

Synopsis of Orginal Bill:

(without Amendments)

This Resolution extends the deadline for the task force’s findings and recommendations from March 1, 2015, to April 21, 2015.

Current Status:

House Passed   On   03/17/2015

Full text of Legislation:

(in HTML format)

Legis.html

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Full text of Legislation:

(in MS Word format)

Legis.Docx   (Microsoft Word is required to view this document.)

Voting Reports:

House Voice vote: Passed 3/17/2015 2:15:13 PM——->Voting Record

Actions History:

Mar 17, 2015 – Passed in House by Voice Vote
Mar 17, 2015 – Introduced in House

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27 responses to “Baumbach goes it alone on H.R.#6 re: Social Promotion! Yep the time has come to stop handing out hollow diplomas

  1. Publius e decere

    What would have happened if this “task force” had not sought an extension?

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  2. OMG. I had no idea this was an actual ‘thing’. I thought the term ‘social passing’ was just a phrase used on social media (but then again, I am stupid and selfish so no surprise there I guess!!)
    “WHEREAS, social promotion, established to keep failing students on grade level socially, is often viewed as severely crippling in later years.” – YA THINK?
    What does ‘on grade level socially’ even mean? Ohh yeah, so let’s pass 8 year old’s who don’t know how to read yet, and then pass them again and again, so they can keep slipping through the cracks until they reach high school and will magically figure out how to read and fit in with their peers. Really? Do we need a ‘task force’ to figure out how destructive and expensive this is? Isn’t this why the drop out rate is so high? Isn’t this why remedial classes at U of D are so LARGE?
    The whole thing is disgusting. How does this even need a task force? And why do they need more time?

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    • Publius e decere

      Social promotion is the source from which we draw our politicians. The vote is about perpetuation of the species.

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    • Publius e decere

      http://legis.delaware.gov/LIS/TaskForces.nsf/113411bdd5de74d385257b3b005e343c/5c0bfdca95d481fd85257cf4006af96b?OpenDocument&TableRow=1.5.0#1.5.

      14 slots to be appoint, but filled by onlyh five members. A “quorum” which only DE could recognize.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Social promotion also provides the voters, Ped. How they select the votees is something I hadn’t thought about, but am enjoying being amused by contemplating that huddle. Bill and Ted’s excellent adventure writ large?

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    • lastDEconservative

      Simmer down, mom, simmer down.

      This is why the founders of the preeminent nation under God saw fit, as did/does God, to leave the ‘raising up’ of children to their *gasp* parents. And why ‘we’ were cautioned that the republic would survive only under the leadership of moral men.

      Scroll forward to the progressive era, and then to today’s 100 years later crop of ‘leaders’ and the fruit of the seeds they planted. Beldar, Jacques, Kowalko, Miro, Ocommie, the coach … the lot of them, couldn’t be in their roles without the work of all their predecessors –Alinsky and the like … and without the legions of undiscerning brainwashed generations of the idiocracy they worked so hard to create.

      No, ‘we’ don’t need a task force. ‘They’ do, to generate the fog and smoke of distraction away from the results ‘they’ created in the first place. Farce that the Bard couldn’t dream up.

      But don’t worry, mom, things are bound to look up … first there was home education, then there was school marm education, then there was government schooling (not education), then there was first grade, then there was part time K, then there was full time K, then there was part time pre-K, then there was full time pre-K, then there were Govt Stars in the diaper rooms of the day cares, and God help us, in the delivery rooms in the front running district of Lake Forest. If you would just willingly hand over your kids to the likes of Jacques and Jack, things would be just fine. Just fine.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “14 slots to be appoint, but filled by onlyh five members. A “quorum” which only DE could recognize.”

      Wow, just wow. Five real people would have been plenty, these five needed 500 real people to balance the act.

      And is that the sound of all the “stupid and selfish” among us railing in the background? I’m not sure, the dominant sound is of the lullaby that’s been playing for so long, and the concomitant sound of slumbering masses.

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    • Publius e decere

      Still catching up to these blog comments. LDC, got to laugh at the Bill and Ted reference. “Bodacious” !! Also got to twist the aphorism in into the “fog of Bore” without “war”ing about it.

      Publius

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  3. 14 members on the committee that have only 2 teachers and no parents–no other residents –this is just an example of the respect those in power have for our teachers, parents and community.

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  4. Everyone okay with 13 – 15 year olds being in elementary schools? If so, fine. But if the “safety” brigade has a problem with that mix then please explain how this would be addressed. Building new schools? Transforming existing schools and providing transportation while denying communities of their AZs?

    I’m all for getting every child on grade level and funding it, but the reality is this only works if space exists. Do we stop accepting kindergarteners and first graders until space opens up? Because if we’re going to hold kids back then there has to be space. Or… are we just going to ignore that part of the problem?

    Being disgusted is fine, but it isn’t an actual solution to a problem. Promoting kids who aren’t ready to be promoted isn’t just a learning problem. It’s a logistics problem, as well. And it won’t be solved by simply dealing with one part. If we’re upset with promoting kids who aren’t ready then we’ll need to discuss all aspects of this problem – which will cost money. If you don’t think it will cost money, then explain.

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    • lastDEconservative

      The ilk that created the many layers of the current mess rails against it, denigrates those that dare notice, and belches a plume of “yeah, but” smoke while declaring that the actually simple solution to the problem is waaaay bigger and beyond the comprehension of the “stupid and selfish.” Oh yeah, and closing with the cut the grass of “oh, yeah, well then prove it; and where’s the money coming from, idiot?” Sigh. Bor-ring.

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    • Anyone wanting to discuss this issue has to, you know, actually be able to discuss it. Is that really a bar set too high?

      People wanting to end “social promotion” need to offer more to the discussion than emotional outcries.

      My ideas would include funding pre-K, comprehensive summer school (with funding) that helps kids catch up, and no more class size waivers – complete with funding that unfunded mandate.

      Your turn.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “My ideas would include funding pre-K, comprehensive summer school (with funding) that helps kids catch up, and no more class size waivers – complete with funding that unfunded mandate.”

      “You” have already done all those things, including funding (“your” favorite utterly false dodge) them all and many more like them and the result is, as always, ta-da, worse.

      Your turn to claim penniless programs. Again. One, two, three …

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    • No, we haven’t already done all those things. We don’t have statewide Pre-K. We don’t have a comprehensive summer school program, and we sure don’t have mandatory class sizes – we use waivers to get around that unfunded law. There are other things we could do, but you couldn’t even honestly address the three I named – let alone add your own ideas.

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    • lastDEconservative

      And thus we come around to what a wise wo/man once said, “The ilk that created the many layers of the current mess rails against it, denigrates those that dare notice, and belches a plume of “yeah, but” smoke while declaring that the actually simple solution to the problem is waaaay bigger and beyond the comprehension of the “stupid and selfish.” Oh yeah, and closing with the cut the grass of “oh, yeah, well then prove it; and where’s the money coming from, idiot?” Sigh. Bor-ring.”

      One must admire the zeal of the progressives: no matter the amount of destruction perpetrated on the masses, the “apparent” destruction is NEVER the result of the progressive methodology, it’s the absence of SUFFICIENT application of the destructive methodology.

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    • “Everyone okay with 13 – 15 year olds being in elementary schools?”
      Really? So it would go that far? That doesn’t even make sense. If a kid is held back when they should be, say 5-7 or so, then it would never go that far. And like MRder said, if it kid can’t get through 2nd grade, at least on the 2nd time around, then that kid needs some type of intervention.
      And yes, hypothetically, in my opinion, a 13 -15 year old is better in elem. school than 13-15 year olds being in high school but reading at an elementary school level. What a huge disservice to them.

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    • lastDEconservative

      There went your invitation to the Progressives Ball, mom. No absinthe for you.

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    • Pretty sure I was never on the invite list to begin with. 😀

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    • Publius e decere

      If the “system” ever allowed for 15 year olds to still be in elementry school then I think it is fair to declare that system a colossal failure. Dismantle the abysmal mess in its entirety, then selectively hire back based on proven ability to produce proficient students, and reset the clock. Notice I didn’t say ability to teach. Slavish devotion to outputs, let the “profession” be creative about how to attain those outcomes. But refuse to tolerate failure to attain those outcomes.

      McClellan was the quintessential HQT … highly trained, did all processes diligently and by the book, toed all the right lines, and was professional in every regard. Lincoln replaced him with Grant, a messy unstructured nearly autonomous wild man from the Western Wilds.

      Because Mclellan could not get results. Grant could. And Grant was later made President.

      Accountability matters.

      Publius

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  5. Are some of these students(who might be socially promoted) be the ones that Kilroy and others claim are being prevented from attending “choice” (limited resource/ seat) schools that are more academically challenging? Are these also the students who should be provided choiced transportation preference to schools of their choice. Does the idea that the schools are socially promoting students not speak to the hypocrisy of appropriate education to ALL students and the hypocrisy of trying to apply student performance to teacher accountability? And the inevitable in congruency between students in a classroom incapable of grade level work pulling resources away from students who are AT grade level or above? Wouldn’t leaving the student at the grade level they are capable of seem more reasonable for the student AND staff? Does the effort to try and make a teacher responsible for students who aren’t at grade level, to students who are at or above grade level not seem ridiculous? If it doesn’t seem ridiculous, IT SHOULD.

    Legislators/ governor’s / Sec of Ed can’t hang an accountability test around teachers’ necks while at the same time force them to socially promote students who are incapable of the work. DSEA should have been all over this test scheme and they weren’t. Instead they used a passive aggressive move to nod yes to the governor/ fed’s wishes (to get the money) and then have taken steps to prevent the accountability sticks. Understandable from a pathetic political survival viewpoint but it has put the public and teachers at odds resulting in dysfunction. We need stand up legislators to denounce party and we need education to have a commission rather than DOE to advise / negotiate with the curly. All schools (TPS, Charter, votech, private) should be represented and have reasonable input. Utopian, and not without pitfalls but there it is.

    Social promotion runs counter to effective education and grade appropriate education. Alternative: leave student at grade commensurate with ability. 3-4 failures would be indicative of learning disabilities or social ineptitude. Neither of which can be addressed by “normal” teachers so why are they being tasked with it.

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  6. Should we be looking at reducing social promotions from a point of view of grouping several schools, rather than each school. If you look at that enrollments of Red Clay’s 7 high schools compared to the 3 they had 10 years ago, you will see a lot of empty program space, if you remove the out of district choice, it would be even more.

    We discuss the achievement of low income children, should we be discussing the achievement of these children when parents are involved, compared to those who are not. Also where they are living.

    When we talk about the lack of funding, should we not talk about the cost of choice from other districts for the 7 high schools. Does RC need 7 high schools, if choice to out of district students was eliminated, would we need more than 5?

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    • lastDEconservative

      Sure, Jack. All that. I can see at least two commissions and a couple legislative study groups (fully populated or not) churning all this for at least three years, or until it is forgotten, whichever comes first. In fact, isn’t that what’s been going on since, well, ever? All in the absence of anything resembling leadership, for which the hunger is palpable, that would step in and step up and set about putting in place solutions supported by *gasp* common sense and unfettered by all the myriad baggage of two dozen layers of government and all its rent seekers, sycophants and hand wringing supporters like the pandoras and Eves and such (who will soon chime in to support you as you wander around in the weeds). Ready? Inhale and hooooooolddddd …

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    • Publius e decere

      Got to agree (in jest) with LDC — sure, let’s get brain-dead with analysis and the consequent paralysis leading to the inevitable necrosis. Let’s study Rome while it burns. Let argue whether or not hydraulics are a science or an ideologiy while the Titanic sinks to the depths.

      Bottom line is that Red Clay’s four all-choice schools — DMA, Conrad, CSW and Cab Calloway — are chock full to the gills with students. HEAVY AND PRESISTNE PUBLIC DEMAND. I am also pretty sure that DMA and CSW and Conrad are danged near 100% Red Clay resident students. Not so sure about Cab Calloway, but I think it is safe to assume they are a clear majority of Red Clay resident students.

      The underutilized physical plant is readily apparent at AIHS, more so and JDHS and clearly so at TMHS. Red Clay could close one of those three campuses and consolidate their “traditional” system into the other two buildings with no problem. Sorry, I meant to say with no problem other than the philosphic and ideologic and parochial territorial shackles they wear about what a traditional school “should” be. The bottom lline is that these three buildings are heavily underutilized, while the four all-choice schools are bursting at their seams and are capped by their assigned physical space — which derives from politics.

      A fair solution could be to “un-cap” the enrollment limits for ALL SEVEN SCHOOLS and then see who signs up for what With the sign-up information, then GIVE/ALLOCATE the space to each school in proportion to its enrolled demand. Work out the asset difference with DMA, and and then treat the seven school buildings as part of an organic whole. If 50% of the district signs up for Conrad, then give Conrad 50% of the space — which would mean that Conrad would have multiple campuses which I am sure they could manage as a “good problem to have”.

      Give The People what they want, especially since they are already paying for it.

      Publius

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    • Sure, we can uncap all the schools, as soon as we remove any obstacles to enrollment, which would include one of those schools letting any African-American or special needs student that applies to have entrance. Sure you want to open that can of worms Publius?

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  7. Joanne Christian

    Did I just go thru a time warp? Is this a SERIOUS inquiry being resurrected here in Delaware? if your districts are handling aging with promotion you have a problem. If your districts are handling (or not handling) retention because of aging you have a problem. It has LONG been advised and employed as common practice in this state, that social promotion went the way of the “R” word. But then again, we’re having assemblies again about the “R” word. Some people need to let bygones be bygones……and keep the darn funding going to support these kids at risk who may be 2+ greater years behind than their peers. Options are there. Pray your districts didn’t absorb those options and redirected funding elsewhere. IF this is truly going on to the level requiring legislative inquiry, we have truly been reduced to even a worse version of ourselves, which plays right into the hands of those who love to give public education in Delaware a black eye. Don’t take the bait. It will be one more smear sensationalized that Jethro graduated with a Delaware diploma. These students work to walk.

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