Sunday sermon for Red Clay School Board

Those who sit at the right and left hand of the Red Clay God (Merv) better take a hard look in the mirror. Though school superintendents make many request for school board approval it is the school board who makes the final approval with no veto power on the super’s part. In the big picture the super’s failures are the board’s failures.  

Merv like every super in this state is a CEO of a unionized corporation where the workers own many legislator. Somewhere in the middle are the children who we always seem to want to put first. Public education is ugly and driven by power, ego, politics and money which are never aligned for the true benefit of children. I can and have straight-up or in my cryptic way ridicule many including Merv. My dislike of some players in this equation like Markell, Hudson and now Lavelle among others has nothing to do with them personally but has to do with their roles in education. I don’t share confidential E-mails or sources. Publius is disliked by many but I respect his rights to weigh-in but certainly don’t always agree with his positions. I’ve been picking on DE DOE Penny but give her much credit for going across the grain to reach out is her bold way. I respect that! In a nutshell, many of us who engaged in public education do so by career choice certainly wanting to make a difference and some of us who don’t ask for a dime do so as part of good or bad is some eyes as our mission to give back. 

I am dishearten to hear (rumor of course) some board members want to throw Merv overboard midstream (before the end of his contract). Those who think Merv may be the problem are just as much the problem. I must remind everyone, it was the unions including DSEA who approved Race to The Top laced with Common Core and Smarter Balanced seeds. And now we hear all the crying from labor as to the ill-effects of the fallout! Yet labor refuses to put a face on the “system”! They refuse to chastise Governor Markell who alienated even his close friends with his love affair with his own ego! Markell pulled the D.C. and Wall Street Trojan Horse threw the gates of Delaware. Markell bullied Merv and all other supers and many board members to kiss his royal ass! The “union” were Markell enablers with Judas carrying the flag! 

I urge Red Clay board members plotting against Merv (rumor of course) to pull their horns in and not degrade the “man” who is stuck in the same political bullshit as many of you. Also board members keep in mind, you are “politicians”. You ran for public office with many promising transparency and courage to lead! Don’t get me wrong for the most part you are doing a great job and I love the individuality among you that does cause friction. A board that refuses to be individuals and cut across the grain is a dangerous body of people. We’ve seen what Markell has assemble within DE DOE! A puppet show full of Rodel clones and ass kissers! So I urge the Red Clay school board members who are sowing a coup to back off (rumor of course). Think about it, should we demand each board member who approve the Markell priority school agenda even in a water-down version to step-down? If you have the courage to tarnish a man’s career why not let that man be Markell and not Merv (rumor of course). Let the man compete his contract if he wishes and then assets and evaluate the direction “you” want the district to go!    

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45 responses to “Sunday sermon for Red Clay School Board

  1. When a player says he’s a free agent, then says, “oops, maybe not”, all contract obligations are dissolved. The management team has the responsibility to determine which of these two future options is in their best interest: a) being reactive… or b) being proactive…

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    • kilroysdelaware

      No that easy! But yes looking for employment elsewhere says I want out. However, the opportunity came his way to apply for a job close to his family and he took it. But then again he is no fool and surely knows the plot! It’s much more of an embarrassment applying for a job when fired! Firing Merv vs not renewing his contract is more about ego and politics on the board’s side! Merv’s only downfall was being a high profile partner in Race to The Top but yet “the board” all but Bec said yes! And I know the Markell I’ll make you a deal you cant’ refuse! I was there when DOE Dan pulled his shit! Then there was DSEA and RCEA with their RTTT cheerleader flag. Not a good idea to use Merv as a scapegoat for the failures of all! I don’t support that! And if they don’t renew his contact so be it ! But there is no need to nailing to the cross!

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  2. I guess the decoder ring is no longer needed!

    Yep, the rumors have been flying – and the number of people who contacted me about this last week was stunning. I thought a coup was supposed to happen quietly?

    It’s no secret I’m not a Merv fan (that’s not personal), but this covert (overt?) plan leaves a bad taste in my mouth. It’s badly done. It’s also clumsily and sloppily done which is what concerns me the most. The way this was handled doesn’t exactly display effective leadership or inspire confidence.

    I also don’t understand the timing? Maybe this would make sense if RCCD had lost the referendum – at least that would be some sort of reason. What is the reason behind this? I have a lot of theories.

    I keep thinking that this move doesn’t have much to do with Merv. Do I think it’s time for him to move on? Probably, but I have a huge problem with the way it’s being handled. It seems there’s a replacement already chosen, and if the name I keep hearing bandied about is true then I vote to let Merv stay superintendent forever. 😉

    I’m not sure exactly what brought this on, but my bet is that it’s bigger than replacing a superintendent. Many of those who contacted me in favor of ousting Merv couldn’t clearly state their reasoning (some even asked me to help them form arguments for getting rid of him) – which tells me that they are pieces on a chess board and not the actual players. Identify the players and we’ll find the reason.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “I guess the decoder ring is no longer needed!”

      The onion has many layers and we didn’t get to the part of a certain charter board members wanting to also serve as an elected school board member. And exposing his campaign manager who has poor interpretation of the law that says sure he can.

      Well here is the law that says no he can’t
      “(b) The board of directors of a charter school shall be deemed public agents authorized by a public school district or the Department with the approval of the State Board to control the charter school. No person shall serve as a member of a charter school board of directors who is an elected member of a local school board of education”

      Then there is Johnny Jet! But perhaps that’s want labor wants, an unseasoned infant!

      It’s all bad and if there is a need for change it can’t be done with such poison. Also, why hand the taxpayers a contract buyout after crying poor-mouth re: referendum?

      More to follow

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    • Greg MAZZOTTA

      Pandora,

      May I add to your comment that this RCCSD Leadership issue is more than the Superintendent. Looking back over 2014 and observing leadership transition in several school districts: Seaford, Laurel, Capital
      as well as several charter schools, I believe this is a systemic problem.

      A key theme for the success of Montgomery, MD school district, the 2010 Baldrige/Education recipient was Dr. Jerry Weast’s consistent leadership for the ten years that their quest for excellence journey
      developed – 2000 to 2010. Several of those education leaders were recruited by Delaware, and have left or plan to leave.

      It’s easy to find a scape goat with such a mis-aligned and mis-measured complicated education system. With over 25% of leadership churn, combined with a sub-optimized DOE, where can the organization’s north star be found?

      I, too, have received many inquiries from recruiters seeking insight
      and suggesting that Delaware may be viewed as a toxic environment
      for aspiring education leaders.

      Again, in agreement with you to “identify the players and we’ll find the reason”. In my opinion, we need to define roles, agree on the AIM of education, align resources and adopt continuous improvement.

      In a conference call last month, a State SecED shared that Arnie Duncan will not and can not suggest that the Race To The Top was based upon Community (Pallantine, IL) Consolidated S. D. the 2003 Baldrige/Education recipient, suggesting that it’s considered bad form to endorse any particular reform strategy.

      In 1993, President Clinton and PA SecED Gene Hickok funded the
      pilot program in Oklahoma with the assistance of Duquesne (Pittsburgh) University, Gov. Tom Carper initiated choice and charter legislation, North Carolina’s Gov. Jim Hunt turned to Dr. Tom Houlihan
      for a school fix and the North Carolina Partnership for Excellence was established to help all NC schools.

      In 2000, Delaware’s education stakeholders invited Brenda Clarke, later a Baldrige /Education (Iredale-Statesville S.D.) recipient to help facilitated the Plan-Do-Study-Work of Quality Education in Milford.
      I understand that this was used in several schools districts with significant results. So, since 1983, the beginning of “system thinking” – thank-you, Dr. Deming- we’ve documented the education pedagogy.

      – did Gov. Tom Carper succeed with Dr. Forgione’s New Directions?
      – did Gov. Minner continue is transforming DOE from the DPI to the SecEd position?
      – did SEcED Dr. Metz add or subtract from the stated AIM of the DOE?
      – did SecED Valerie Woodruff drive this education innovation for ALL schools?
      – what was Dr. Lowery’s role in embracing the RODEL initiative?

      The DSEA, DASA, DSBA, DOE and the Chiefs funded our efforts in 2000, yet seem to be ignoring the growing body of knowledge regarding continuous improvement and sustainability in education.

      Indeed, time to identify the players, seek root cause, and get back on track. Higher Ed’s, nationally – especially in Ohio – are re-configuring
      their Schools of Education to reflect the developments of the teachiong and learnings of the past 20+ years.

      The University of Pittsburgh’s School of Education supports this
      effort, especially for low performing schools, and I remain eager to share these plans with all education leaders. News: UD, WilmU, Wesley, DTCC remain silent and should be receptive to the proven education innovation since 1983 and embrace a “systems thinking” approach in order to design/build/sustain sustainable transformation.

      A far larger issue, in my opinion, is that Health-Care is adopting quality based practices – a rate of 10:1 – in part, because their accreditation
      bodies demand so. The education accreditation bodies assume the same posture as SecED Duncan and will not endorse any ONE way.

      Yes, corporate interests seek to seize financial opportunities in this growing learning gap. Recently, the education company from the UK, Pearson has signed a $1B contact with Saudi Arabia for education materials and support.

      I remain eager to help with resources from the state quality programs – DE, PA, MD, NJ, VA, RI – and as the last, local standing volunteer and remain grateful to Gov. Carper for his actions in 1993.

      Perhaps…might name this program in honor of his accomplishments in quality at some point?

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    • Pandora, the players are right before our very eyes. In front of many eyes these days. This is a long game. And the pieces are almost in place for the biggest coup d’état of them all! Also think about who has been very quiet lately and why. Tomorrow will bear an interesting announcement which will put the final pieces in play.

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  3. Publius e decere

    “Publius is disliked by many but I respect his rights to weigh-in but certainly don’t always agree with his positions. ”

    Publius must correct Kilroy on this phrase. First off, it is only “some” people who dislike the opinions of Publius. But let’s admit it, Publius’ opinions raise hits on your blog which gives it a rising tide feel. Secondly, it isn’t really a right it is a privilege which I do respect. And thirdly, it isn’t so much Publius’ positions that “some” people dislike, it is those Luddites’ reaction to the real and persuasive effect of Publius’ ultimate and prevailing logic.

    Now THAT’s a sermon. Got to go, need to meet my Maker. Mark my words.

    But before I go, it might be worth noting that coup’s rarely work out well for the plotters. Their apostasy, lack of trustowrthiness and their unwitting role as tool typically does them in. Just ask any competent history teacher.

    Publius

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    • the real and persuasive effect of Publius’ ultimate and prevailing logic.

      Best line ever. I’ll be laughing the whole month.

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    • Publius e decere

      Laughing at the tragedy called CSD? Try selling the ten-years-idle Astro Power building. No hiding from that.

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    • Publius, as monstrous as your ego is, you are right on some points. But I also know a bit about where your more recent comments are stemming from. And I understand. We may be on the same page sooner than we think. I finally understand what you fear, and I have some of those same fears. Now is the time for us to fight.

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  4. kilroysdelaware

    ” But let’s admit it, Publius’ opinions raise hits on your blog which gives it a rising tide feel.”

    OMG what an ego! With Publius there would be no education related blogs :)!

    “Secondly, it isn’t really a right it is a privilege which I do respect”

    And you’re a better person than Markell who fails to engage his critics! I am starting to think DOE Jenny is the only one down there that has real courage!

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    • Publius e decere

      Sure there would be education blogs without Publius. Just like there would be without Kilroy or the eponymous “KO”. It’s all in the moment.

      Courage and DOE-Jenny are not the same. She has squandered her position on hackneyed themes. Forever sidelined. It was hers to lose, and she succeeded. A self-made reduction.

      Publius

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  5. No dog in this fight

    My guess is that, if there are rumblings among board members about removing asuperintendent, it may well have started with staff members who are unhappy with the boss. Usually, in my experience, school boards don’t fire superintendents who successfully lobbied for money (i.e., referenda), and who don’t have major labor relations problems. It does not sound like the Red Clay superintendent failed in either of these areas.

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  6. Give me a break

    I find it funny that merv is ‘in trouble’ yet his school system dealt with the bs priority school crap efficiently, passed a referendum and by in large operates pretty well…meanwhile their neighbors in CSD got spanked in the referendum, fumbled the priority school thing, operates terrible schools with no achievement and no control over kids, gets bullied by OCR yet the super just smiles …
    Merv is not perfect but shouldn’t be pushed out.

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    • fumbled priority schools? You mean by fending off the state and keeping our staffs and stability over the DOEs specious disruption? Ok, we fumbled then.

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    • No dog in this fight

      Reading the articles on Christina District makes me think they don’t have any idea what is going on. The superintendent and board president say in the paper that they are reducing costs and are going to make sure the public knows about the cost reductions. The problem is, if the district spends less money on poor programs that people don’t want, people will still not want them, and will likely vote against future referenda. The district appears to have a poor product; unless they change the product, why would the public support them?

      Looked what happened in other areas — in DC, the public wouldn’t support the schools, so they implemented vouchers (which worked, but which have now been discontinued); in New Orleans, the public was sick of the system, so they started a charter district.

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    • Give me a break

      Ok the super handled priority brilliantly… Too funny, no wonder he still had a job .
      I’m not saying DOE is competent but CSD handles everything like bafoons ….so much incompetent ‘leadership’…layers and layers of incompetence…and they all just keep getting new contracts…shameful.

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    • Give me a break

      John at least you did not refute my claims that he is responsible for operating terrible schools with poor achievement and lack of student control,getting bullied by OCR and feeble leadership in building support for the referendum… I know you hate DOE….they are awful we agree … But take priority schools off the table, CSD is still in a shambles

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    • Publius e decere

      “CSD is still in a shambles”.
      C’mon, let’s cut that comment (or that district) down to size.

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  7. I would have to completely disagree that CSD is in shambles. It would be the equivalent of saying the Russian Army was in shambles after winning the battle of Stalingrad. (For those missing a few lessons in history, they then went on to take Berlin)

    CSD has had to make moral decisions no other district has had to make. (Lately the priority schools fiasco put Red Clay in the same bailiwick). They did not cave to the corporate raptors.

    The real difference between these two districts, is that Red Clay keeps the charter money within its district, wheras Christina has to give it away….

    But, if anyone takes the time and trouble to compare scores (horrible method right?) between schools of equal income levels in each districts or any other in this state, one sees immediately that one district does not do better than the other…. The accumulative score totals of Red Clay appear better, simply because it has more students in schools above the poverty line than does Christina.

    Since all here know that scores directly follow income levels, to judge one district against another without factoring that major influence, is immoral and pointless…..

    As for what IS important… do buses run on time, are teachers teaching, do children get fed, I would have to say Christina is equal or above most other districts. If you are trying to blame them for not turning 500 word vocabulary 1st graders into Einsteins in 12 years, then you, are the fool, not those running the district.

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    • Give me a break

      Test scores really mean nothing to me. It is shambles because the schools are run down and students out of control. Inept administrators.

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    • alsonewarkmom

      The schools, (with a couple of exceptions) are NOT run down. Take a walk through Downes, West Park, Shue, Stubbs…and so on. How exactly are the administrators inept? Because they have schools full of poor children? I’ve been a parent in CSD for 13 years and I couldn’t agree more with Kavips. I see teachers and administrator breaking their necks to provide a great education for our kids. And to Publius’ point, I have always respected CSD for not “chartering” our district. Our family embraces diversity…too bad more parents don’t.

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  8. Publius e decere

    “The real difference between these two districts, is that Red Clay keeps the charter money within its district, wheras Christina has to give it away….”

    Umm — Isn’t Newark Charter School in CSD? Maybe CSD should authorize a charter school (after actually attracting one, good luck with that) to be located in its decade-long empty white elephant building it has owned at taxpayer expense with no plan in sight for using it nor returning the investment to the taxpayers.

    ” scores directly follow income ”

    Umm — I guess you really don’t know any rich people. Nor any poor people. If you really want to ignore the individual and run with the average, then –yes — CSD is absolutely in a shambles.

    ” what IS important — buses on time, teachers teaching, children eating ”

    Umm — are your expectations really that low? After all, is this all you expect from student achievement after — in your words — 12 years?

    Publius

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    • ^The above answer defies most people’s idea of logic. After all, it is well documented that test scores chart directly against income….Here is more fascinating analysis showing that not only between reduced lunch and wealthy, but also within reduced lunch, levels of income control scores…..

      And perhaps you missed my point… Red Clay keeps the charter money inside its district because it is the authorizer. This means that if opening a new charter directly affects them negatively and will diminish the amount spent per student on all children across their entire district, they can say “no, we won’t do it”…

      Christina has no such option…

      That is why the above response made no sense?

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    • Publius e decere

      You have heard of Odyssey charter school? Located in Red Clay, not authorized by Red Clay, filled with Red Clay resident students and growing by leaps and bounds. Just borrowed big bucks to build a huge campus right in the heart of Red Clay.

      The only difference between RC-Odyssey and CSD-NCS is the contrasting tone within the two districts. CSD people often speak as if Newark charter has caused CSD’s dysfunction, when in fact it is CSD’s dysfucntion which has fueled Newark CS’s viability. Red Clay seems to try and embrace a diversity of school types.

      The difference between the two districts has accumulated huge dividends for Red Clay over the past decade. Red Clay has a portfolio of unique schools, whereas CSD apears to seek every school to be identical. Merv can tell anyone who asks the difference between AI, McKean and Dickinson strategies as well as the strategies of each of the magnet and charter schools under Rec=d Clay oversight. Can CSD identify the different strategies across its high schools? Or is their strategy to squash all differences?

      Publius

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    • Why ignore history when presenting Odyssey as your example, Publius? It’s curious how you set up an apples to apples comparison, but don’t mention that Odyssey was chartered through Red Clay.

      Odyssey was a Red Clay charter until Red Clay (you know,the authorizing body) didn’t authorize their desired charter modification, then Odyssey left RCCD and went to the state. So much for districts having a say in the charters they authorize.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “So much for districts having a say in the charters they authorize.”

      RC made its move. Odyssey’s move. They did.

      If the Mervs and Freemans operated with similar spinal fortitude with respect to the capital S State’s diktats, all the kids would be to the good. This is about the kids, right? Odyssey acted in its and its kids best interest. Haven’t seen much of that from any TPS “leaders” for quite some time.

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  9. Give me a break

    Hey also…why do they refer to Shue as ‘Shue Zoo?’

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    • alsonewarkmom

      Who refers to it as the Shue Zoo? Newark Charter families? Independence families? Holy Angels families? It certainly wasn’t any of the families I knew at Shue. My son spent 3 years at Shue, and it’s not a zoo. It’s a school. Stop by sometime. You’d obviously be surprised to see 800 middle schoolers doing what they should. Give Principal Michelle Savage a call for a tour before you call it a zoo ever again.

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    • I hear ya, alsonewarkmom. Some people think anecdote = data.

      Their constant need to bash other schools, to run a propaganda campaign against schools their children don’t even attend, baffles me. Aren’t they happy with their school? This really comes off as insecurity. Why do they think it’s clever to label a school full of children as a zoo? On some level this bashing satisfies a need, a feeling of superiority, in them.

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    • alsonewarkmom

      Thanks Pandora, this is my frustration with so many people in Delaware and on this blog. Spouting off about schools with no actual experience. It amazes me how people can be so hateful about schools for goodness sake. On any given day you could walk through Newark, Cab, Dickenson, Brandywine or St. Marks and see no noticeable difference (except maybe the color of the faces). I’m sick of defending my kids school. I’ll keep doing it of course, but I am sick of it. Why must you put down others to make yourself feel good? Enjoy your kids school experience and let me enjoy mine. Delaware is toxic.

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    • Eve Buckley

      ANM, the toxicity is probably a natural outgrowth of the culture of competition that DE has deliberately fostered over the past decade or more, via its school choice policies. If schools have to compete for students & dollars, they can do this in a range of ways–among those is putting down the competition while propping themselves up. This goes in all directions, in the deliberately competitive landscape of DE public ed. A collaborative public school culture would be nice, but things haven’t been structured that way–there’s no incentive for schools & families that are fighting over dollars & students to work together or acknowledge each other’s strengths & varied challenges.

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    • Publius e decere

      Eve,

      You portray competition as a bad thing, although some of us view it is as A Good Thing. I think the thing you might be assuming is that competition is a zero sum game to scrounge for fixed-and-scarce resources. I have a more expansive view of it.

      By giving people choice, a school must compete for their attention and their endorsement. As each school responds to this, they innovate and over time the tide rises, thus lifting all boats. Competition is the creative genius of our society. We should embrace it while ensuring a safety net for all.

      This “competition” has been going on for generations. Location location location. A philosphy which denies this is not realistic In U.S. society, but a philosophy which recognizes this innate competition and then “also” seeks to try and find income-mitigating or legacy-mitigating rules is probably a viable one.

      Publius

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    • Publius e decere

      P.S. Collaboration is a French characteristic, not necessariy one to emulate. 🙂

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    • I would say you have a limited, not expansive, view of it, Publius. A competition for a public service isn’t a true competition if the rules in place exclude certain participants.

      Why do you keep pretending everyone can access choice? You know, as well as I, that the ability to utilize choice relies on many factors. A family choicing out of their AZ into another district school will need to provide transportation. Even charter buses don’t run everywhere, so transportation is an issue – an insurmountable one in many cases.

      Transportation alone is a self-fulfilling, self-selecting prophecy. If you want to champion choice, then champion real choice. Begin with removing the transportation obstacle. Provide transportation for every choice child. That would go a long way to realizing this “competition” you wax lyrical about. As of now there’s no true competition in Choice since the contestants are preselected.

      And when it comes to public schools it is about fixed and scarce resources. There’s only so much money. Altho, affluent schools have the ability to further enhance their schools by adding to those limited funds, creating more economic disparity between public schools.

      You say: “By giving people choice, a school must compete for their attention and their endorsement. As each school responds to this, they innovate and over time the tide rises, thus lifting all boats. Competition is the creative genius of our society. We should embrace it while ensuring a safety net for all.”

      What does this safety net look like? Flesh this out for me.

      How long have we had Choice? 20 years? When do all boats start lifting? When does all that competition trickle down? Surely, given Red Clay’s rampant use of choice since the very beginning, all of their schools have improved, right? If not, why not?

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    • Eve Buckley

      The safety net in this case is the schools for residual children–those the charters don’t want, either due to the kids’ shortcomings or those of their parents. Some charters manage to keep them out during the admission process (tests, fees, auditions), others return them when things go sour. Meanwhile, as the more desirable (to charters) kids & families leave, the public schools for residual kids are left with growing financial deficits. In Philly, where half of students attend charters and the district faces an $85 million deficit for next yr, outside consultancies estimate that every student moving district to charter costs the district ~$7,000, because so many costs are not incurred per-child (e.g. utilities), but the funding is sent as if they were. As the charters grow, the district is strangled with thousands of least-advantaged kids inside. It’s a parasitic system, by design: charters thrive at district cost, and poor students are trapped in the middle. Nice net.

      Competition is the genius of American business, maybe. Not of American public services. Democracy was the genius of American public schools when they began (and helped boost American productivity for much of the 20th c.) Competition is the antithesis of democracy.

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  10. No dog in this fight

    kavips: “As for what IS important… do buses run on time, are teachers teaching, do children get fed,”

    So all you want is babysitting. Pretty low expectations.

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    • Give me a break

      hey also— i’m there every day!!!!!at shue! how long ago were your kids there– how bout you take a tour tomorrow! not where the principal wants you to go– just wander!

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    • Actually the expectations should be that every child gets an equal chance to improve themselves through education to a better future. Since everyone learns differently only individualized instruction can adequately sort the proper needs and apply proper restitution.

      Which flatly means, you cannot teach someone arriving with a 500 word vocabulary the exact same way you would teach someone entering with a 5000 word vocabulary…. If you teach one way, you will lose some group, either the high or low, in the process.

      No. The only way to achieve success is for individual experts (teachers) to evaluate children and then teach what they need to know.

      That is impossible to accomplish with over 11 students.

      Therefore as another reminder: here is exactly what is needed.

      An 11:1 student teacher ration in all schools under 50% reduced lunch covering grades K-5 and all of th 9th grade….

      Raise Delaware Income levels on the top echelons of income to cover the expense. $70 million of this opportunity is being wasted yearly.

      Dissolve the relationship between test scores and teacher/principal/school performance, and instead use the data provided by these tests, (which are amazingly specific btw,) to fill in gaps the student missed in his/her past.

      Grouping each group of 11 children as closely as possible to the same spot in their development curve, based off their last test score, so all are learning from that one teacher at close to the same place.

      Phase out charter schools which suck money away from public schools. If you wish to keep charters, have them funded by line items in the state budget, and not by stealing valuable necessary resources from all others in public schools. The state (wealthy) will have to cough up more money to afford the luxury which so far, has not shown any return (only loss) on its investment.

      These are the opportunities our DOE and current administration wasted. These are to become the focus of the next Governor and the next administration, be who it may… If anyone is serious about improving education, these are the things that must be done.

      What is silly, is creating more charters… That is going the wrong way, penalizing children and parents and districts, simply to steal state money for one’s own pockets.

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  11. Well, technically, babysitters are paid more, hourly. And they aren’t even unionized.

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  12. When comparing achievement, especially high schools, don’t forget RC includes CSW and DMA, also CAB and Conrad have over 600 out of district choice students and over 1500 in the district, excluding CSW and DMA.

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    • No dog in this fight

      I assume Jack is bragging about the 1500 students who, as I understand it, don’t live in Red Clay, but make the free choice to attend a Red Clay school. That is something for Red Clay to be proud of. The way Jack worded his entry, one could interpret it to mean that he thinks it is a negative for 1500 students to choose to attend a school they are not assigned to.

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