Delaware’s High School Dropout Rate drops to 2.1%!

Go to slide 18, Delaware high school dropout rate is 2.1% for 2013-2014 school year. 

Grad rate and dropout rate presentation
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7 responses to “Delaware’s High School Dropout Rate drops to 2.1%!

  1. This data is very interesting. I like how they did an adjusted 5-year graduation rate in addition to the standard 4-year rate. Felt the ending was a little abrupt, though. Would have been neat to sit through a presentation of this data.

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  2. From what I’ve read outside of this presentation, there are lots of issues with comparing drop out and graduation rates. First, we already know that kids are relatively transient, especially within districts, and especially if they are “trouble”, so they won’t necessarily show up on any given drop out or graduation rate as expected. Second, when adjusting for the 5-year and 6-year student completers, graduation rates increase dramatically. Third, sometimes kids who drop out go back, either to the same school, a different school, or an adult ed/GED program. This also significantly increases the overall graduation rate, when you change from looking at it as a graduation rate and switch to looking at it as a high school diploma holder rate.

    I hope that makes sense.

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    • lastDEconservative

      I think you make it perfectly clear 28. Graduation rate, drop out rate, completers, different school graduates, adult/GED graduates, overall graduation rate (my favorite), diploma holder rate …

      It could only make sense to someone or some organization whose intent is to obfuscate, mislead, trick or fool those she/it should be serving … honestly. Oh, and trying to avoid any appearance of responsibility/accountability for the truth being hidden.

      The perpetrators of this nonsense (“this” meaning ALL of it, not just this particular teaspoon full) must praise the Lord every day that their (small) audience is, well, Delaware public school grads themselves. Well, not the Lord in the usual sense, but Beldar, or the Coach, or maybe even Ruth Ann or Carper, or …, or, or, …

      In retrospect, “completers” is my favorite.

      Being a great fan of young mothers, I’m glad there are no thriving corporations here anymore transferring people in who are innocently trying to research the government schooling (not education) landscape to decide where to live.

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  3. graduation rate is a cohort measure and dropout rate is a year to year event measure. The feds have specific formulas that are required to be used for reporting both. The formulas for how they are calculated are described in the slides though. I do like that there is a new dropout measure reported, which is a cohort based model. That gets more to what I think John is asking about but since the federal grad rate is a four year cohort, adding a dropout cohort still won’t equal one hundred because as Jax said, there are five and six year completers that don’t graduate in four years but they are not dropouts, so you have three categories essentially: dropouts, four year graduates, and those still enrolled but not yet graduated.
    What I saw even more interesting was some of the major shifts in both grad rates increasing and dropout rates decreasing in specific schools. I will certainly listen in to the recording after next week’s SBE meeting to hear how this is presented and the discussion that follows the presentation. Agree with Jax – this is quite interesting data.

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    • lastDEconservative

      With head spinning and hair hurting, I add “enrolled but not yet graduated” to the list of the leviathan’s obfuscations and then simply say, I rest my case.

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    • For me, MHS, the goal is to get our citizens educated. That means I don’t mind if they take a little longer to “get it together” to make that happen as long as it happens. Although I would prefer to see kids go through the educational system (be it traditional or charter public school, private school, parochial school, or homeschool) and earn a traditional degree in the expected 13-14 year time period (accounting for pre-k), it is undeniable that developing a love of learning later in life should be encouraged and accepted, not degraded or shunted aside. Virtually every type of occupation requires some sort of diploma, whether high school or college, so it is really important that we make sure avenues are available to those who aren’t completing in the way we would prefer.

      Thanks for the clarifications, too. I’m wishing I could attend the SBE meeting, but I’ve got surgery scheduled for the next day and will be out for an entire week, so I didn’t want to take even just a half day from work. At least I’ll have time to locate and listen to the audio!

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