Christina school district should give DE DOE the three priority school! Let Markell choke on them!

State: Christina must close or hand over Priority Schools Matthew Albright, The News Journal

The Christina School Board must choose by Feb. 27 whether to close its three Priority Schools or hand them over to charter schools or other education management organizations, the Department of Education has said in a letter to district staff sent Tuesday. 

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69 responses to “Christina school district should give DE DOE the three priority school! Let Markell choke on them!

  1. CSD and RC should have done this from day 1. When DOE challenged them to a game of chicken the districts should have said…”here Dover you fix a thousand, poor, unmotivated children who were born of teenage mothers and no father ..you know best give it a shot”. Of course that was a bit more complicated in RC since they were part of the RTTT cheerleading squad!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I would like someone from the Kilroy community to give the name of one person in Dover that has first hand experience working with students that are eligible for Free and Reduced Lunch, live in a single family home and come from the zip code 19801 and 19802.

      After finding the name of one person that actually taught in a city school- give me the name of one person that taught in a City School that had 90% poverty and made AYP at least two years in a row. Just one person that is making these decisions. The lady from California that taught in Baltimore may be the only one and she apparently has not made any friends in the Kilroy community- so here name does not count.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lastDEconservative

      Denizens! Hop to!

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    • Generalizations about absent fathers and lack of motivation on the part of students does nothing to contribute value to the conversation.

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  2. lastDEconservative

    C’mon, Kilroy. Beldar could run those schools for the rest of his term and the next of whoever’s at an ever increasing rate of failure before “look what I mess I inherited” ran its course.

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  3. Kilroy- can you get your readers to help me out here. I read the letter on Transparent Christiana that Penny from California wrote. It sounds like she is giving Christina the opportunity to walk away from the city. Then who gets the kids. Do they become charters? and belong to no district? I don’t get it- it sounds like she is giving them a way to dump the kids.

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  4. The great thing about the state taking over – they’ve never failed at anything.

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  5. Let the state take them over, maybe than they will learn what is facing these school level employees.

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    • Let the State take them over, but here is the catch…..pull all staff from the buildings and redistribute them throughout each district. The State doesn’t want them anyway. That has been made abundantly clear. Let the State hire whoever they want at their bargain basement prices to show the districts how it’s done. Have at it State. Put up or shut up! Who the hell would want to work under the States stated mandates for priority schools?

      Christina should throw in the other city buildings as a bonus and vacate the city altogether. Never should have been there in 1978. Surely not now in 2015. Imagine the $$$ transferred to Red Clay from Christina. Imagine the money saved by Christina. No busing. No need for referendum for either of the districts. Think of it as a redistribution of wealth. Dems should love it! Where is the GOP in all this? For? Against? Indifferent? Either way it is a win win for everybody, kids, families, taxpayers, teachers, politicians, advocates.

      Liked by 1 person

    • lastDEconservative

      Gee Oh Who? Oh, you mean the GOMeToo.

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  6. Publius e decere

    Maybe CSD should have played ball. As it is, their walk-off looks like they could care not a whit about the schools. This tempest should have been about the kids, it should not have been about the adults and their pride — but it was. Another pyrrhic victory for CSD. Delaware — Small Wonder.

    Publius

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  7. The Democrips and the Rebloodicans of course…..the two gangs fighting for control.

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  8. Question: Is the RCCD community (at large) okay with taking over Christina’s part of the city?

    By my calculation that is approx. 1800 additional (mostly high needs) children moving through their K-12 schools. Do the RCCD middle and high schools have the capacity for these 1800+ students? Does the redistricting plan include additional money/resources (separate from those that already exist) for RCCD? And why would a district with 3 priority schools be willing to add 3 more (plus two more elementary city schools if the redistricting plan goes ahead). What is the benefit to RCCD?

    And given Red Clay’s history with its high poverty schools, why would anyone think RCCD has the solution to this problem? They have ignored these schools since the opening of Brandywine Springs and the NSA.

    I’m not saying there isn’t a benefit, I’m asking what it is. And given the Cooke Elementary School freak out over including a low income population into their attendance zone, I’m seeing a high school and middle school (merging population) problem on the horizon. On the other hand, Merv applying for a new job suddenly makes sense.

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    • Give me a break

      all legit questions. This thing is so poorly thought out, actually that may be overstating the thought that went into this. Markell got in bed with the vision people, RTTT folks and the business people. He then hired someone in Murphy who could not be more over his head if he jumped off one of those ‘Deadliest Catch’ boats in the Berring Sea.
      I can tell you that by the 27th the one thing that WON’T happen is the state taking over these schools-that would force them to actually understand what a CHILD or PARENT is…those are 4 letter words to those assholes.
      There will be a magical ‘amicable’ solution at midnight hour –the politicians (Freeman, Murphy, Markell et al) will come out smiles and say we did it for these poor underserved kids… you heard it here first!

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    • All good questions, pandora, that don’t appear to concern DOE staff. I guess if/when RCCSD fails these students, charters & management organizations will be back on the table (a positive, from our DOE’s perspective).

      Question: someone pointed out to me that by reconfiguring the Warner/Shortlidge (is that right?) campus, RCCSD is buying several years before they’ll have to show any pos. results, b/c under federal regs. (NCLB?) any school that is so substantially reconfigured gets several yrs to establish a new baseline for evaluation. By that time, new gov., new super, new turn-around plan. Is that correct?

      GMB, whatever you think of Freeman, I don’t think he is on Markell/Murphy’s team. If they’re together, it is a very well concealed relationship.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I had heard something along those lines, Eve, but I’m not certain. It does make sense, tho… Warner and Shortlidge would become two different schools. Would Shortlidge (as a K-2 or 1-2) even be a Priority School since they wouldn’t be tested?

      It also makes sense since splitting these schools into 2 grade sets had nothing to do with helping the children or parents of these schools. So, splitting those schools may have been a way to buy time for RCCD – which would benefit Red Clay while making life more difficult for city parents.

      Here’s another question… If RCCD takes over Christina’s city schools then will those newly created Red Clay schools buy several additional years as well due to district reconfiguration?

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    • Eve, politics, high paying jobs etc make strange bedfellows. In the 11th hour they will strike a deal saving face for all. Possibly securing a beautiful consulting job while collecting a pension…
      And pandora you are correct…reconfiguring basically means “this shit is hard let’s pass it on to the next group of politicians, administrators etc.”– by maintaining a state of flux in the name of progress the rooster never comes home to roost (I think that’s a saying?)…. There are no Harry Truman’s in this group… The buck goes round and round

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    • Publius e decere

      I think Red Clay has a student-and-family-centric rationale for their plan. I don’t think they are so cynical as to game the system as the comments here appear to suggest. Red Clay is striving toward a glass-half-full solution and we should back their plan.

      The same opportunity (as Red Clay is pursuing) might be possible with the CSD schools. I would like to think that someone in CSD actually looked into this instead of rejecting The Man out of hand.

      The state may have been clumsy in suggesting that creativity can only come from a higher salary. Red Clay is proving that creativity can come from within when circumstances call for it Whatever CSD is proving, however, doesn’t seem to be getting traction.

      Publius

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    • lastDEconservative

      ” … RCCSD is buying several years before they’ll have to show any pos. results … ”

      Wow. Eve didn’t exactly confess to discovering fire, but this would lean one to believe that she may detect a bit of warmth from the general direction of discernment.

      Aided by her fellow traveler with this ” … by maintaining a state of flux in the name of progress the rooster never comes home to roost … ” one could almost expect an epiphany among a few of the entrenched denizens as to … all together now … what is really going on.

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  9. A true progressive recognizes a terrible decision, backs up, and starts over back on the right path. We do not live in a progressive state.

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    • Publius e decere

      Nor do we live in progressive (your definition) school districts.

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    • lastDEconservative

      No, a true progressive (in the commonly accepted political sense) recognizes a terrible decision THAT CREATES HAPPINESS OR SUCCESS, backs up, and starts over ON A DIFFERENT DESTRUCTIVE PATH.

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  10. lastDEconservative

    Why all the handwringing denizens? Come out on the 24th and tell the brain trust how to do it. Ledford’s operation is putting on the comedy of the year, Imagine Delaware, Ed edition, no. 2 I think it is. Opening act: Beldar Conehead, aka See No Evil. Great timing. I’m sure every one of your index card questions will be answered — no editing by editor Ledford … wait …

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    • Publius e decere

      I can’t “Imagine” why the newspaper would hold an “education” forum on the day of an important (or not) referendum for the two largest school districts. School taxes are proposed to rise by double digit percentages, seniors are proposed to get an addition kick in the teeth (losing the odest school tax credit) and the city of Wilmington essentially running CSD out of town on a rail. Then there are charters which people want to attend getting closed, while their students get displaced to schools they don’t want to attend. Ay caramba (fonetic speling)

      Imagine Delaware. Only in Delaware. Small Wonder.

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    • This all needs to be about what is best for the students. Will their outcomes change by a district reconfiguration? I would tend to doubt it. They will still be facing the same challenges outside of school no matter what district they are in. Poverty won’t disappear with this. Everyone is talking about the proficiency of these students as if this is the lifeblood. It is the construct behind the proficiency, the standardized test. This is where all the talk is coming from but they aren’t saying it. This is the mechanism by which every decision is being made about education, except the actual mechanism itself. They have Wilmington so distracted by this conversation because it holds the bulk of the state student population. As well as the media center of the state. Take away the mechanism. Opt your child out of the state assessment. Don’t wait. As long as they can use the mechanism to distract you, they hold the power.

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    • Publius e decere

      Well, it is clear that CSD fears a change, hence their digging in. Red Clay “boldly went where no district had gone before”. In an over-regulatd world, Red Clay did well. And did right.

      By analogy, the opt-out crowd (crowd is a big word, lets more accurately call it a vocal fringe) digs in against change. The vast majority of the public views testing as the summative proof that the teaching was effective. It’s as natural as the sun rising in the east.

      History in many aspects has proven that ostriches have it sadly wrong. Cluck cluck. Ditch the vacuum tubes and embrace the LCD before we all go to The Cloud.

      Proficiency matters. Embrace its pursuit. Opt out, schmopt out.

      Publius

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    • You just don’t get it Pubic. Proficiency certainly matters to you and your “constituents”. It is what allows you to thrive. If you truly think the opt out movement is just a vocal fringe, then you might want to get some ear plugs. The DOE is who fears a change. They are terrified of it. It only takes one shot to start a revolution, and that shot was already fired.

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    • Publius e decere

      Setting aside your sophomoric insult, “proficiency” is what society is built on. And has been, for a millenium. Imagine a society where everyone is incompetent, do you really want that? I don’t.

      The DOE is striving to drive change. State-promoted bootstrapping. The Opt-Outers are resisitng this (and all) change with blind bare-knucke balderdash. Kowalko kwackery.

      You are a good front man for the deniers. Your defense of the indefensible is noted. But the inexorable march toward improvement, proficiency, and high performance is a steam roller you should not tand in front of, Stanley.

      Publius

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    • Sorry, meant to write Public, guess a millennia of typing skills hasn’t gotten me to the finish line. 😉

      In any event, so we march towards proficiency. We get the scores up, we close the gaps. And then what? Keep testing, keep scoring? When was the last time you were in a classroom? An actual classroom? Not a board meeting or a meeting about schools, but the actual heart. Do these students look truly engaged? It’s all about rigor and drive, and getting the scores up. For what? Who benefits from this? Cause we can’t have all the students being proficient. They will just keep changing the bar.

      There must always be winners and losers in the march towards proficiency. You represent the winners, and you have made damn sure it stays that way. I say fuck the march. I say fuck the test. I say let these kids learn with interest in their eyes. I say when they are struggling, don’t take away their lunch and have them get “extra help”. Don’t keep them after school to get “extra help”. Let them be. Cause this way, it doesn’t work. Maybe at “certain” schools it does. Go ahead, test their standardized little brains out. But when you come out of your secluded bubble, know that these aren’t adults racing in the corporate marathon to be the best. This is what you and the DOE don’t friggin’ get. These are kids. But you want them to be adults because you don’t know how to be. You want to put them all in the same box so you can say your school is the best. It’s bullshit Publius, and you know it. And then when you rig the “march” to make sure all the fastest kids are already in the front of the line, that’s called cheating. And discrimination. And segregation. That’s the shit that pisses me off.

      You can keep saying the Kowalkos, as if putting a political name behind this will demean my cause. I’ve felt this way long before I ever heard of Kowalko. I always got confused between Sokola and Kowalko and couldn’t tell them apart (more need for proficiency for me, beat you to it). To me, this isn’t a political thing. It’s not a Democrat, or Republican thing. It’s not about the march. It’s about learning, and when that joy gets sucked out of kids for the purpose of one fucking test, one score, what’s the point? Cause this march you keep talking about will grind to a goddamn halt. The very thing you are trying to prevent will become reality. If kids don’t want to learn, and we allow this to happen, then who do we blame then? The kids who are now adults? If we lose these kids, and it will happen, who do you think is going to take care of you when you are ranting and raving on Kilroy’s Rodel in 30 or 40 years?

      It’s not about progress or change. Would you say your education was horrible? Who asked for this change? Who forced it on our society? Who said we are so far behind the rest of the world in education but those who profited from implementing those changes? We can sit here and say it’s all the teachers fault, cause we have to pit it on someone, right? It’s not the students, they weren’t taught. It’s not the parents, they aren’t in the schools. So we must blame the teachers. Your way leads to little clones and minions running around and bumping into each other and not knowing what the fuck they are doing.

      I have no problem with holding teachers accountable. None whatsoever. What I have a problem with is the construct. There are numerous ways to find out if a teacher is effective, this isn’t it. Your way benefits those in power in the short-term. Like I said, keep this in your segregated school. Until the day comes when the courts say you can’t do that. And when you come out of your common core Kool-Aid drinking banner waving on the Bataan death march towards teenage proficiency stupor, I’ll be watching the rest of American kids thriving based on a return to recognizing their unique and individual talents adding renewed vigor, not rigor, to the American dream.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Truth be told Publius, this isn’t about going where no one has gone before. It’s the Kobiashi Maru test and Mr Williams is no Kirk. So in a rare moment of clarity and a vote of 4-3 Christiana has avoided being put into the “DOE rack”.

      In a very basic root cause analysis, neither the schools, nor the teachers, nor the admins are the cause of the low performance. I’ll let the more enlightened identify what or who’s left. The “residue” Mr Smith mentions is NOT a parameter that educators can fix yet it keeps turning up the target that everyone says educators should. If RCCSD thinks it has a solution to the no win scenario then have at it and show all the other districts the algorithm that solves the unbalanced equation.

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    • Publius e decere

      That was actually a well-expressed piece, KO. Except for the multiple F-bombs, but maybe that is normal for you. You should work on that, many people turn off their listening mode when they hear it.

      You seem to have missed my fundamental recoil on this blog. I want everyone to have choice, whatever that choice is. The anti-choice crowd says that “my” (aka, Publius) choice should not be allowed while “theirs” should.

      Understand?

      If you want to opt out that is your right. I don’t think it is a smart choice. Hence my OPINION being presented in blog comments here. And I guess that there are others who share my opinion. And still others who share yours.

      We can debate on the next blog-turn the merits of:
      — raising the bar – a life-long reality no matter your position in life
      — a challenging test — isn’t the CCSS and SB supposed to be challenging?
      — global standing – sorry you can’t see it, but yes the world is outpacing the U.S. on average. You may not be getting much international exposure to see this, but trust me it is real. The U.S. needs to significantly up its game for its citizens’ benefit.
      — opting out — I think of it as ostriching-out. Enough said.
      — “picking students” — whatever you think I am you are probably wrong. Assuming you think I am in a position to pick students(*), you might want to reconsider. STUDENTS (and their families) pick which schools they want to attend. Denials come from — yes, admit it — arbitrary limits on enrollment which are set by anti-choice people. The easiest way to eliminate any doubt about whether a school is “picking” students is to waive any and all caps on enrollment and then question why they are denying enrollment to students. In the short run it might be pragmatic (limited building space) and in the long run might be strategic (which you could take issue with). The problem is that the entrenched powers don’t want to run the “test” and see what the public really wants for its tax dollar. Yes, they might want a 500%^ increase in charter schools and yes that might leave district-managed schools having to downsize or close. Isn’t the public interest being served buy delivering on public choice? I think the anti-choice crowd is afraid of the true desires of the public and is resisting a cap-waiver which might reveal it. So there.

      Publius

      (*) I might not pick you, my one exception to the rule. 🙂

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    • K.O. believes in choice. His actions say so. He switched his son from school to school until he found one he felt fit his individual needs and preference. Kudos to you Kevin on exercising your right to choose!

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    • Publius e decere

      Well played, Pencadermom. A beautiful tee shot, right down the middle. I think KO may be playing a chip shot from the shoulder.

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    • What about CSD’s right to choose to not play the Priority Schools game, Publius?

      Unfettered choice for all!

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    • Publius e decere

      Are the Priority Schools regulations creating a new situation for student and family choice? I don’t think families have been told to transfer out of these schools, they can choose to stay. To the extent that families can’t choose to transfer out, that limitation reflects other preexisting shortcomings of the law (examples: choice transportation; charter enrollment caps; no oversight of the inefficient use of public school building space by districts) — the limitations on choice are not caused by the Priority School regulations.

      I think the primary, if not sole, effect of the Priority School regulations is to compel district boards and administrations to face their shortcomings in the oversight of these schools and to compel those boards and administrations to resolve to improve on their weaknesses. Red Clay got a mitt and ran onto the field. Did CSD stay in the dugout?

      You should be glad the Priority Schools have gotten beaucoup mulligans in the past. A charter school can apparently be closed without political repercussions even when the school actually meets AYP. And the kids in those schools didn’t have the choice to stay in those schools under new management (whether by a new charter company or by a district takeover). The state exercised its power to close those charters by fiat. Just like it is exercising its power to compel change at the Priority Schools.

      Priority School regulations are not about choice — they are about targeted oversight of failing schools. The state gave the Priority districts a rope. One district used it to lasso the raging bull and create a solution. The other district tied a noose, stood on a soap box and then tied itself up in knots.

      I guess I “choose” to see the situation differently from you. 🙂

      Publius

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    • Respectfully and regrettably, on this topic Publius I disagree.

      “One district (RCCSD) used it to lasso the raging bull and create a solution.”

      I do not agree that a proposed plan IS a “solution”. It is a plan constrained by pre-existing conditions and without proof the plan can provide the desired result, it is nothing more than another experiment utilizing taxpayer funds. And again, those pre-existing conditions are less about education and more about life conditions of those affected.

      I would not deny that oversight has fallen short but in this circumstance as it pertains to a governor / DOE demanding the schools do “something” different, the schools don’t have the means. More money thrown at the wrong tool is akin to handing a baseball player a basketball to improve his game. They are that far removed. It is all a push to make schools into something they are not. They are not crisis management specialists and they are not family counselors. No doubt they are being told to be that by the legislators, DOE, and governor but that means those “directors” are telling district residents to fund that which isn’t education based. That way the directors don’t have to fund or raise taxes on those residents directly for what other social services might or should provide. They can blame the schools for mismanagement and blame the taxpayers for being unwilling to contribute to the “care” of children. Herein is the paradox and redirection. Demand schools solve a non schools problem, pit taxpayers against one another, scapegoat the providers of education and all the while mask the transfer payments from one group to the other.

      Yes the districts fear change because as RTTT, Vision 2015, and common core implementation,have shown that the players are incompetent. Why engage in a change directed by the incompetent? Again, a no win scenario championed by a player ill equipped to implement it but willing to direct/ misdirect all the parties involved for a net gain of zero. In this case, the only winning move professor is not to play.

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    • lastDEconservative

      A plan is not a solution.

      Another of those rare occasions when a line addressing the fundamental flaws in the system with beautiful simplicity and succinctness is uttered.

      Huzzah, M.

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    • Pencadermom, you are as clueless as Alicia Silverstone. Believe me, I would have liked nothing better than to have NEVER switched my son from any school and he didn’t have a disability. That’s the bottom line. For all those who say I am against choice, I have never said that. What I am against is choice with exceptions, and that IS the case in many charters AND some public schools in Delaware. Given some things you know P-Mom, that was an extremely cheap shot and incredibly rude. But keep playing for the crowd!

      Publius, we will never agree on these matters but I do enjoy the banter!

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  11. Pingback: Two Unique Views on the March to Proficiency, Just Opt Out Now! | Exceptional Delaware

  12. The test is brutal… Every educators job, (if they care about education) is to talk as many parents into opting out as they can. If you don’t, you are complicit, and being complicit makes you like Michelle Rhee.

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  13. Proficiency…hmmm…I really enjoy reading about proficiency. Who exactly determines what proficiency is? Oh that’s right. The guys who write the test – none of whom spend a day in a classroom. Do you have any idea what percentage of questions on a 50-55 question DCAS was the proficiency cut-off? I do. It was absurd. You’d probably crack up laughing. That aside -Ask yourself who is grading the SBAC. It’s not all machine scored. Find out what they’re getting paid per hour. There’s a story right there. Millions of kids across the country are to take this test, graded by low-paid graders – with stacks and stacks of questions in front of them for them to wade through and score on a 0/1/2 point scale. Yeah, this is going to go well. This is going to go so well. SMH.

    By the way, when they write a test and predict that only 37% of the students will be proficient, do you think there’s a problem with the instruction, or the test? I assure you, more than 37% of our students are grade-level proficient. FAR more than 37%. This test is a joke. Have you seen the machinations that students have to go through on the to answer questions? Go to the SBAC portal on the web and take a few practice tests. It’s unbelievable what they are about to put these kids through. My very good students are going to do poorly on this test this spring; not because they don’t know the common core standards very well, but because the test they are about to take is the worst example of an assessment I’ve ever seen. If their parents opt-out, I really don’t care. I’ll give the kids something else to do, meaningful. Maybe they’ll spend the morning exploring Pascal’s triangle, or the Fibonacci sequence, or they’ll create 3D models out of designs they design with algebraic dimensions. You know, something that the Finns might be doing, instead of wasting 3 days on an assessment that tells me nothing, tells their parents nothing, tells them nothing, and lines the pockets of Pearson et al.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “If their parents opt-out, I really don’t care. I’ll give the kids something else to do, meaningful.”

      Why don’t you opt out your entire brood? Just think, John of Arc right here in the Republic. Now for that, I’d come out to your room singing songs and’a carrying signs. Do it, brother.

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  14. Political demonstrations that do not produce the intended effects are useless. There are far more effective way to achieve success than turning in one’s badge.

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  15. I am not their parent. I know we’ve reached a point in society where you expect me to be their parent, but in loco parentis goes only so far. I am a teacher. I am not a surrogate parent, and any society that wishes me to be so for these children is one that is doomed. I can make a difference in the lives of these children, but ultimately, it is up to parents to make choices for their children.

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    • lastDEconservative

      This “I” doesn’t expect you to x, y, or z. All the “I”s you see in the shadows of your imagination, well, that’s different. You misread dramatically ‘what is really going on’ in the “two camps” as you call them.

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  16. School choice is wonderful, until individual schools have the right to deny your choice. We do not have an even playing field, and an even playing field is the farthest thing from the minds of those who champion school choice as the be-all end-all solution to education. When public school A can kick you out because your socio-economic status or disability is preventing you from being successful in their school (poor grades, transportation issues, checkered past with discipline issues, absent parents, unemployed parents, underemployed parents, drugs, crime, shootings on their front portch), and public school B must keep you, we have a very serious problem. School A has a weapon – expulsion, and moreover, denial of entrance in the first place, that School B would be sued for using. Those who support school A do not believe in freedom for all. They hide behind the rims of their drinks, and wink to their partners in crime when you glance away, but in truth they don’t want “those” kids in their schools. They brandish “choice is freedom” as their weapon in dialog, but they are not interested at all in choice for all. They are interested only interested in self. I’ve read these debates in Kilroy for quite a while, and it is more than obvious that the two camps are trying to solve two different problems. One wants a better educational system for all of society. And one wants one for their own children. Figure out want camp you belong to, and recognize what the other wants. It’ll save you a lot of time and energy. And if this post bothers you; well, it should. All of your private-access-only public schools are doing nothing to make this a better world.

    Liked by 1 person

    • John
      If our TPS’s & legislators hadn’t prioiritized the majority of normal and higher achieving students to second class status and elevated the IEP’s, 504’s and children with all manner of other behavioral problems to be the pinnacle of attention, there would have been no movement for choice. Instead our over accommodation of every nuanced learning disability and behavioral exception has left little for parents or students who truly are seeking good safe education. The moral arguments to satisfy this demand don’t change the facts that with limited resources schools make tough choices, unfortunately they been siding with pc choices rather than choices that benefit the majority. The academically and behaviorally challenged are not the majority but they are absorbing the majority of resources and affecting the majority. Is it reasonable to expect the normal majority to accept subpar performance and repeatedly be asked to foot the bill for that subpar performance without objecting? The choice argument has its roots as the result choices by the legislators and TPSs. You can dislike the result but the cause was not created by those that choose an alternative.

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    • Publius e decere

      I think the Midnight Ryder has nailed it.

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    • Publius e decere

      Sadly, John, you’ve apparently been “sipping from the rim” of your sour grapes more than most. Stop wine-ing. Choice is inherently focused on the self of the chooser. It is the SYSTEMIC RIGHT of choice-for-all that allows everyone to choose what is best for them individually. You probably don’t want me to choose what is best for you, and I certainly don’t want you to be choosing for me. I don’t want to choose for you, but it seems you want to choose for me. Which we should all hope is a world to never come.

      Publius

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    • Choice is inherently focused on the self of the chooser. It is the SYSTEMIC RIGHT of choice-for-all that allows everyone to choose what is best for them individually.

      Publius supports OPT-OUT!

      Liked by 2 people

    • That would be a “CHOICE”, wouldn’t it John! PUBLIUS FOR OPT-OUT!

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    • lastDEconservative

      M didn’t just nail it, s/he did it with a succinctness and clarity bordering on that of an encyclopedia entry over which a dozen eggheads and wordsmiths would have commiserated for weeks. A 1951 encyclopedia mind you, like my revered World Book set, sans modern day political correctness, is what I refer to. Huzzah, M.

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  17. Pube, you needn’t to prove to which camp you belong. It’s obvious to all of us that you aren’t interested in the betterment of all. We’re simply interested in solving different problems. MRyder – are you serious? You actually believe that school choice is based on too many accommodations on IEPs and 504s? Look, I have no problem with private schools. What I have a problem with is locking out large swaths of our public from “public” schools under the guise of this nonsensical charter movement and “specific interest” entrance examinations. CSW is a private school. DMA is a private school. They are run like private schools. You can be kicked out. Dickinson is not a private school. Do not begin to compare the results of CSW to Dickinson. If you want a CSW or DMA, fund it privately. I have no problem with that. But stop taking public dollars to fund the semi-private schools – especially when there is little to no oversight! When was the last time CSW or DMA took their best practices and shared them with McKean or Dickinson?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Publius e decere

      john,

      no sour grapes there? you accuse a lot with no facts. which says a lot about your credibility. are you even listening to yourself?

      of course the only one comparing anything to Dickinson is you. why don’t you reexamine the Dickinson programs for IB and MYP and then think about your diatribe here. those programs are pretty good. and they passed through the Red Clay board with a mere PowerPoint and promises. and they are every bit as selective as the charter schools you so clearly despise.

      please tell me you don’t teach in the Dickinson IB or MYP programs. those programs deserve better.

      Publius

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    • lastDEconservative

      There’s a lot to like lately coming from our John, Member no. 119 of the Can’t See the Forest for the Trees Kilroy’s Denizens Corps, but this one bears repeating:

      “When was the last time CSW or DMA took their best practices and shared them with McKean or Dickinson?”

      Let me guess. It was right after McKean or Dickinson submitted their request for a BP discussion. No? Then I’m at a loss.

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    • Don’t feel too bad John, Publius is ignoring me. He usually has a quick comeback for me, but perhaps I stepped a wee bit over the line.

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    • No one’s ever been kicked out of Dickinson? I find that hard to believe. How about out of their IB program? Anyone ever not make the cut? Do students need to be able to keep up with that program to stay in it?
      I believe the kids at DMA have to make sure their shoes are shined and their hair is kept a certain length.. just to name a couple of their many best practices. I say that’s a great idea for the schools you mentioned 😀

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    • lastDEconservative

      Wait, Pmom, how on earth did you learn about any of the DMA secret sauce? It sounded like such things were unknowable …

      And your remark has me laughing all over again about the inanity of John’s whining about the secrecy of the best practices of the best schools, as if most were not of simple common sense knowledge of most adults!

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  18. The Red Clay referendum for a 25% Tax increase needs to be defeated as a beginning of a Citizen takeback of our original districts.

    Suburban RC is not responsible for the inter city remedial/at risk population and will not bailout other districts that want out. The 80’s experiment failed to such an extent that it has all but destroyed education in NCC.

    A new Wilmington district is needed, controlled and supported directly by State/Federal money and the best guidance of Wilmington residents. College Prep classes are being compromised because everyone is considered CP and only AP students escape it. Low performing students shouldn’t be shunted along as College Prep, but instead, receive technical training at an evolved Vo-tech school system.

    btw. Cell phones are the impediment to education, with their “gangsta” messages. They should be checked in at the door. That would allow education to prevail.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “The 80’s experiment failed to such an extent that it has all but destroyed education in NCC.”

      “Low performing students shouldn’t be shunted along as College Prep, but instead, receive technical training at an evolved Vo-tech school system.”

      I MUST start collecting sentences in a retrievable form and location.

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