He we go again! dropout age 18 not 16

Wilmington lawmakers want mandatory school attendance until 18 By Tom Lehman

Wilmington council members are calling on Gov. Jack Markell and state lawmakers to raise the age for compulsory school attendance so that students would be required to attend until they were 18 years old.

City lawmakers passed the a resolution Thursday night with the support of advocates. Currently, Delaware law allows a juvenile to drop out of high school at age 16.

Nothing new with the call for this change! 

What do you think: A 16 year old should have the authority to sign himself out of school (dropout)? Posted on by kilroysdelaware 

H.B # 244 was table in house committee

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30 responses to “He we go again! dropout age 18 not 16

  1. I believe that because education is the difference between success that all children should be required to attend school until the end of the school year when they are 18,

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  2. This is the most bizarre discussion our society has. Of course a child should stay in school until he’s 18 (and hopefully has graduated).

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  3. What’s the difference? Is someone going to suddenly save them from themselves in the magic years between 16-18? Now that I don’t trust our education system (thanks Kilroy et al.) I think it’s just about making drop out numbers look good and possibly help graduation rates, not about helping kids, as usual. (because a lot of kids won’t turn 18 until the end of 12th grade or close to it if they have a spring or summer birthday)

    Notice both comments. The first says ‘attend school’, the second says ‘stay in school’. Neither one really matters if that’s all you’re doing; attending and staying. Might as well say ‘taking up a seat’.
    If the conversations between lawmakers were more about stopping social passing and helping kids age 5-13, we might not need conversations about dropping out of school at any age.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Pmom, “thank you” doesn’t do justice to the appreciation I have for your three paragraph commentary above. Your displays of discernment (ex. “Notice both comments”), critical thinking, ability to recognize what I call noticing “what is really going on” (“not about helping kids”) — is a refreshing and encouraging tidbit in the sea of knee jerk, ad hominem, progressive toe-the-line blather exhibited by the majority of the denizens. That little bit of snark adds a + to the A, compensating for the -2 points for not spacing the second and third paragraphs.

      There’s only one thing I think could have made your grade so high as to exempt you from the next assignment. That being to have said, for example, “Why 18? What’s the advantage of keeping them through 10th grade instead of 8th”, or words to that effect.

      Huzzah.

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    • I chose “stay” in school intentionally. Your point is well taken, but I disagree. Sometimes taking up a seat in school (that would otherwise be empty) might, just might, prevent him/her from taking up a seat in prison. It does matter, if for only one kid. Re: your 5-13 comment – I concur with you absolutely. We have to fix/change/end social passing. Too many kids are in middle school with a 2nd grade education because they’ve been passed on up the line. I don’t blame the 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th grade teachers – the kids’ parents don’t care, or are clueless that their middle or high school aged son/daughter really has a grade school education. Social promotions don’t do anybody any good. But then again, you can’t have 12 year old second-graders. Or can you?

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    • JOhn: “Too many kids are in middle school with a 2nd grade education because they’ve been passed on up the line. I don’t blame the 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th grade teachers – the kids’ parents don’t care, or are clueless that their middle or high school aged son/daughter really has a grade school education. Social promotions don’t do anybody any good. But then again, you can’t have 12 year old second-graders. Or can you?”

      First, not always parents fault, one of my kids was slipping through the cracks, not a bad as some kids and was caught early enough, but, very long story short, I would say he was being socially passed.

      Also why can’t you have 12 year old 2nd graders? It shouldn’t come to that point anyway, not even close, but if it does, isn’t it better to help that 12 year old instead of simply plopping him/her in an ‘age appropriate’ classroom just to take up a seat and count ceiling tiles because he/she is clueless as to what is going on in the advanced class?

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    • Seriously Pmom, you want 12 year olds in classes with 7 year olds? Thats a recipe for bullying. a frustrated, larger pre-teen with a more advanced emotional state but the same grade level intelligence is a set up for bad things.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Yeah, Art, especially since the system the leviathan now perpetrates on the failing is so effective.

      Pmom didn’t say he had to sit next to the younger kids; separating those unwilling and/or unable would be a good start to opening the door to much needed and deserved attention being focused on the willing and able by enlarging the scope of separation reasons. Fewer un-s, more success for the remainder.

      Oh yeah, I find it breathtaking that you condemn a 12 year old as a bully simply because she’s 12 (she makes you stop for a minute, eh?) and is presented with targets of opportunity. Where’s the compassion in that?

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    • Wow the thought of a 12 year old bullying a 7 year old is very sad.
      Like lastDe said, he/she doesn’t need to be side by side. Is passing him along year after year a better option? And like I said, it shouldn’t get that out of control in the first place. Don’t pass a 1st grader on to 2nd grade if he can’t handle 2nd grade work. If he couldn’t do 1st grade work, why in the world would anyone think he could do 2nd grade work.
      And if you want to talk about bullying, think about this same kid when he reaches 7th or 8th grade but works at a 3rd or 4th grade level. That’s where the real bullying will start. Or, at the very least, the start of the complete demise of his self esteem and probably his future.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Having had a few minutes to think about this one, I’m not so sure the worry should be about the 12 year old being the bully …

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  4. They should drop it like its hot.

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  5. If a kid drops out at 16 obviously parenting isn’t a strong force in the household. Making a kid who doesn’t want to be there remain isn’t good for those who value the education.

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    • lastDEconservative

      C’mon, Art. 97.6% of what goes in government schooling (not education) isn’t good for those who “value the education.” It’s those that I fondly refer to as the “willing and able” that must be punished by any means available for demonstrating talent or interest at or above some bottom of the barrel minimum! Actually, I credit the zealous, look-at-me, idiot elites who came up with this idea with a high score for creativity in advancing said cause.

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  6. The problem of older kids in schools who have no plans to graduate or actually be a student needs a more creative solution. I think all sides believe that the school environment would be better without them.
    These dropouts whether they do it at 16, 18 or 20 present many problems for society.
    Here is an idea, think outside of the box. How bout a business employ them, teach them the skill and how to be a good employee. For doing so the business takes the first $10,000 of the kids salary out of the education bucket. Let’s face it, business sits at the table and continually tells educators how to do it…. Well step up

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    • lastDEconservative

      At $175,000.00, 50% non-refundable down, I -might- consider it.

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    • Sounds good to me. Or something similar anyway. I like the idea of thinking outside the box.
      I’ll hire them at age 16 but they have to agree to work towards their GED and I want 20K (if they are 16 that’s 10k per year right?) 🙂 And I want it up front too

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    • LDC you get $10 grand per year per kid. You teach them industry specific skills and employability characteristics. You put them in a professional environment, deal with their lack of background training and all the baggage that goes with it.
      A minimum wage employee makes roughly 15$k per year full time…so if taxpayers pay the first 10 you get what amounts to slave labor for a couple of years.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Isn’t this fun, mom? I can’t believe in one day we have potentially discovered a THIRD Zero Business Understanding alternate universe denizen. ZBU 3, let’s say, so we can keep track.

      Wouldn’t you love to be in a position to just hand over the reigns of your small biz just one day to these wizards? I would love for them to see just how much money I make per minute and with how little effort and with how tiny a risk to the family jewels. Just once.

      PS to Give me … in ZBU 3. I already have plenty slave labor, what other kind is there, right?

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    • lastDEconservative

      Ah, futility, but I can’t help myself.

      Okay, I get 10 grand to put a child incapable of rudimentary math and absent any communication skills on my payroll for a year. Now let me see, what shall I have her do? In a “professional” setting. All the while teaching her life as well as academic skills. Hmm. Wait! Is this the same child for which I paid that much in property and income and casino vigorish and God only knows what other taxes to the state for the last 10 years? Ouch! I’m starting off $90,000 in the hole! Wait again! Merv or one of them couldn’t do it for $18,000 per year! You are asking a lot, denizen of ZBU-3. Still, I would vow that at the end of one year, I would deliver you a citizen. At the aforementioned rate.

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  7. A GED means nothing… You as the employer have to train them on the employability skills they need. They had a shot at a free diploma… Any academic education is on their own.
    The district forfeits their tax money ‘for the kid’… Essentially the employer becomes a charter entity…. Money follows the kid

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    • lastDEconservative

      “You as the employer have to train them on the employability skills they need.”

      Here’s another news flash for the denizens of all the ZBU alternate universes: the above statement is absolutely true today, will be tomorrow, and has been for as many years as I’ve been an employing maker. $10,000 toward doing what the vast majority of employers have had to do since, oh, say, 1961, would be lost amongst the cost of putting them to work … mind you, it would only be fair to award every hiring company such a stipend, but that’s not how ‘fair’ works, is it? Not in the ZBU universes. The makers ‘owe’ the losers, right?

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  8. So a full time worker costing you five grand a year is not a good deal? As an experienced employer and capitalist I’m sure you turn that five grand into a million! This is a bonanza for the business round table! Slave labor, train them the way you want and in he end have a skilled, non-union worker for 30 years! Win,win

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    • lastDEconservative

      Not that it would make a dent in your lack of understanding out there in ZBU-3, but just .t.r.y. to think through this … what, besides take home a check on Friday (as I drive him home), would I have this taker do? Should I put him, pants half off, thug cap on, in front of my paying customers to ensure sales continue? Write my ad copy maybe? Oh, oh, oh, operate a $12 million piece of equipment? Monitor my phantom blog for postings from Angos and delawarerabid? Good grief. Now, if I had a casino, now that would be different …

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  9. Schools get a fraction of 90$ and so do you… As a free market guy I’m sure that you understand that concept.
    As for my business acumen, have owned one since ’92. Careful, you have no idea who I am, as a matter of fact I might own the chateau down the road. I just happen to understand that the ills of public education aren’t quite as simple as you. And as a ‘have’, I have a different outlook on ‘have nots’

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    • lastDEconservative

      And exactly how many of the aforementioned washouts do you pay every Friday? And I don’t care who you are. Much success!

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  10. Give me a break

    my business is a small one… If such a plan were implemented (obviously I wrote a very rudimentary almost tongue in cheek plan) I could employ maybe take two kids with a training financial supplement. However, my premise is that even as a pretty successful self employed guy who understands the way of the world I still would struggle turning these kids around- my point is that society is a disaster… blaming the schools and sitting on the outside pretending you can fix schools without fixing these totally screwed up family/cultural situations is impossible– and by the way I’m not for dumping more welfare etc. to the cities… there just has to be a way to fix this– lets face it welfare doesn’t work, outsourcing jobs hasn’t worked (well maybe for you but not the country)

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    • lastDEconservative

      ” … my point is that society is a disaster… blaming the schools and sitting on the outside pretending you can fix schools without fixing these totally screwed up family/cultural situations is impossible– and by the way I’m not for dumping more welfare etc. to the cities… there just has to be a way to fix this– lets face it welfare doesn’t work, outsourcing jobs hasn’t worked (well maybe for you but not the country)”

      On this, we agree.

      No outsourcing here.

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    • I also agree.

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  11. Give me a break

    so big business takes a black eye from LDC on the outsourcing? The building of Chevy’s in Mexico etc? Business with bottom line has brought nothing (actually less than nothing) to fixing the problem.
    And you tend to blame the schools all the time, so ….

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    • lastDEconservative

      Can you do no better than put words in others mouths? And you’ve become incoherent. G’night, mate.

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