Delaware Charter parent OD’s on Kool-Aid

Charter schools best choice for children /Letters to The Editor / News Journal

Charter schools provide choices for children who want to join the military, specialize in music, or pursue a career in finance or science. Charter schools can identify a child’s skills and enhance those skills while simultaneously instructing them with the basic educational needs every child should receive. Charter schools provide parents with alternative choices for school in case a parent does not agree with private and public schooling. Charter schools allow children to be more diverse and interact with people from all over the country and world.

Jared Davis

Newark

First I want to say,  charter schools are a valued option in the scope of school choice. I support concept of choice school in Delaware 100%. However choice can also be provided internally in all traditional public schools.

As far as the charter comment about the military. Long before Delaware Military Academy, JrROTC was available for public schools. In fact the amazing Chuck Baldwin formal commandant and founding member of DMA  lead the JrROTC program at Christiana High School. Also, in the community there are programs such as The Young Marines founded by The Marine Corp League with full support of the United States Marine Corp and The U.S. Navy Sea Cadet Corps founded by the Navy League of The Untied States with full support of the United States Navy. These organizations including DMA aren’t about training tomorrow warriors. The are about helping building character and discipline of our youth.  School district and all charter schools need to consider exploring expanding JrROTC in their high schools and reaching the The Young Marines and Sea Cadets that do operate in Delaware for elementary through high school age students. The Young Marines start at the age 8 and I believe the Sea Cadets at age 11 for both boys and girls. 

Music and Arts: Creating a “magnet” school such as Cab Calloway see fine. However, every school should have drama, band, and enhanced arts. There is zero need for even a magnet school.

Fiance and Business: The programs can be offered within existing high schools and even middle schools. 

“Charter schools allow children to be more diverse and interact with people from all over the country and world.” No charter schools hinders diversity and because of certain admission preferences well crafted into the law by racists it fuels re-segregation via de facto segregation. The landscape of America is changing and the world is coming to America as it did from the birth of America.  To pigeonhole children in schools “designed” for them is dangerous and counter productive to promoting diversity. “America” is on the edge of major civil unrest because broken promises made in regards to education and advance in equal rights have stalled. The election of an African-American president is only a short-term high and a milestone for African-Americans. And speaking of diversity, our president is of mixed race black and white.

Again, charter schools are a welcome option but end the racially seeded admission preferences forcing charter schools to have open admission with a “transparent” lottery system free of “counseling out techniques” they popularity will dwindle. Public schools with internal choices even in academics can exists. Honor and AP programs have been around long before charter schools. And yes specific interest did apply to honors and AP. However, the schools that housed those programs did exclude at-risk student and special needs students. School vouchers will be a game changer and are feared by both charters and traditional public schools.           

6 responses to “Delaware Charter parent OD’s on Kool-Aid

  1. Vicki Seifred

    Kilroy, I could not agree with you more!! Other than the Vo-tech schools that have programs that would be difficult to offer in a traditional public school. I can’t think of a charter school/magnet school that offers a program that either is already available or could be implemented. It’s the thought I had when I worked at a private school; I believed you were not necessarily paying for a superior education, but for the “type” of student your child would sit next to in class. The difference? Families chose to pay tuition. Charter schools use our tax dollars to achieve the same thing. Think about it. Is this fair and equal??

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  2. lastDEconservative

    “School district and all charter schools need to consider exploring expanding JrROTC in their high schools …

    Music and Arts: Creating a “magnet” school such as Cab Calloway see fine. However, every school should have drama, band, and enhanced arts. There is zero need for even a magnet school.

    Fiance and Business: The programs can be offered within existing high schools and even middle schools.
    __________

    Yeah, yeah, yeah … the TPS could do all these things, but they don’t. And why not? Lots of reasons, but start with the govt employee syndrome — no incentive or demand to succeed, no penalty or disincentive for failure. So why bother? Why exert? Pay’s the same, free dental’s the same, early out’s the same, time off’s the same, raises from the Fred’s efforts are the same …

    If Merv, for example, was of the competitive ilk, he wouldn’t be a taker, he’d be a maker. Charters were to spawn/spur competition (for one thing). What happened? The false premise that takers would suddenly become makers, obviously. The question is whether the false premise was by accident or by intent put into the system by the creators.

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    • Explain the economics of a district offering all programs in all schools. If you took the funds used by charters and put them back into the districts, you cover the additional baseline teachers needed and physical space. At least I assume you do. How do you pay for the music and the drama and the business programs, etc.? Honest question.

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  3. Vicki Seifred

    If the pay from all the administrative salaries of all charter schools were put back in the traditional schools/ districts budgets , would it cover the costs of additional programming? Charter school directors/ principals/ Presidents or whatever they are called make much more precapita than any traditional school or district.

    As far as the programs being offered in traditional schools, many are still there but sadly many were cut. Resources are simple being spread too thin.

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  4. Greg MAZZOTTA

    Vicky…may I extend the resources (being spread too thin) to include Education leaders? Since 1993, I’ve observed many talent searched state-wide as well as in several states and note that recruiting and retaining talent remains a challenge.

    Simply stated, DE is note considered user-friendly by many leaders I’ve spoken with. Frequently changing standards and political influences present their own dynamics.

    DE would be well served to grow our own talent and keep the air
    clean in order to support new voices and faces.

    Seaford’s recent superintendent, Shawn Joseph comes to mind.

    My sense is that DDOE has yet to establish their culture from the
    1993 transition from DPI – Dept. of Public Instruction.

    2015 does present an opportunity to improve.

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    • No dog in this fight

      This man’s writing ability is at the same level as Kilroy’s. That’s not saying much for someone supposedly involved with “quality”.

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