Delaware ACLU speaks-out and puts Red Clay on the hot seat! @arneduncan @washingtonpost #edude #netde @dedeptofed @destateboarded @usedgov @EducationOIG @huffingtonpost #neatoday @NSBAComm @NatlGovsAssoc

ACLU AND CLASI FILE COMPLAINT WITH OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS

CONTACT: Kathleen MacRae, ACLU-DE Executive Director—302.654.5326 x102,kmacrae@aclu-de.org; Brian Hartman, CLASI Disabilities Law Program Project Director—302.575.0660 x220; bhartman@declasi.org

Wilmington, DE (December 3, 2014) — The American Civil Liberties Union and Community Legal Aid Society, Inc. filed a complaint today with the Office of Civil Rights in the U.S. Department of Education arguing that Delaware’s charter school law and policies have a discriminatory impact on students of color and students with disabilities and have significantly contributed to the resegregation of Delaware’s public schools. Specifically, the complaint claims that the State of Delaware through the Department of Education and theRed Clay Consolidated School District, the two entities that authorize public charter schools in the state, are in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Every student in the State of Delaware deserves equal access to a high-quality education,” said Kathleen MacRae, executive director of the ACLU of Delaware. “But what has evolved since the passage of the Charter School Act of 1995 is state-sanctioned preferential treatment for families who are able to navigate the special requirements of charter school admissions.

“These include such things as high examination scores; essays written by parents to explain why a school is a good choice for their child; access to gifted and talented elementary and middle school programs that help increase academic performance; annual activities fees; mandatory parent involvement, sometimes in fundraising; and mandatory high-cost uniform purchases. These barriers prevent students from low-income African American and Hispanic families from having the same access to high quality charter schools that middle and upper class families have.”

“We hope that the Office of Civil Rights recognizes that any system of selection that has the effect of almost completely excluding children with disabilities from the ‘high-achieving’ charter schools is deeply disturbing and must constitute illegal discrimination,” says Dan Atkins, Legal Advocacy Director of the Disabilities Law Program of Community Legal Aid Society, Inc.

It’s terribly unfair to the children with disabilities who should have earned their place in those schools, and it sends a harmful and hurtful message, really to everyone, to continue to shut those students out. We look forward to working with the federal government, the State of Delaware, and Red Clay Consolidated School District to develop criteria that integrate more students with disabilities. This is consistent with the State and Federal Government’s mission to provide equal educational opportunities to all children—regardless of race, income, and disability.”

RACIALLY IDENTIFIABLE SCHOOLS

The complaint documents that over three-quarters of charter schools operating in Delaware are racially identifiable. High performing charter schools are almost entirely racially identifiable as White. Low income students and students with disabilities are disproportionately relegated to failing charter schools and charter schools that are racially identifiable as African American or Hispanic, none of which are high performing.

Another result of the proliferation of charter schools is increased segregation in traditional public schools located in districts where charter schools operate. In addition, when the impact of the Neighborhood Schools Act of 2000 is considered, inner city school children have no good alternatives—they may attend a hyper-segregated traditional public school or attend a hyper-segregated charter school. When charter schools admit a disproportionate number of higher-income White students with no disabilities, the traditional public schools are left with the difficult and costly task of educating the students most challenged by poverty or special education needs.

RECOMMENDATIONS

In order to remedy the current situation regarding Delaware public schools, the ACLU and CLASI urge:

  • A moratorium on the authorization and opening of new charter schools until an effective desegregation plan has been implemented;

  • Utilization of a random opt-out lottery for charter school admissions;

  • Assurance that the cost of attending a public charter school is free and that parents are not required or pressured to purchase uniforms or raise money for the school;

  • Capping class size in traditional public schools at the same level as charter schools and ensuring that total funding for traditional public schools is equal to that of charter schools;

  • Providing additional funding to schools with a disproportionately high number of students of color, students with special needs and low-income students;

  • A plan to ensure that students with disabilities are recruited and reasonably accommodated in all charter schools.

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49 responses to “Delaware ACLU speaks-out and puts Red Clay on the hot seat! @arneduncan @washingtonpost #edude #netde @dedeptofed @destateboarded @usedgov @EducationOIG @huffingtonpost #neatoday @NSBAComm @NatlGovsAssoc

  1. lastDEconservative

    “This is consistent with the State and Federal Government’s mission to provide –EQUAL– educational opportunities to all children—regardless of race, income, and disability.”

    All you hand wringing Alinsky-ites must be in agony. One of your own either didn’t get the memo, is somehow one step behind the progression of the nature of the whining of the perpetually aggrieved, or *gasp* doesn’t buy in to the whole “equity” argument and is stuck in the prehistoric days of “equality.” Or, perhaps, some drone typed “opportunities” where “outcomes” should be; yeah, that’s the ticket.

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    • Someone didn’t read.

      Providing additional funding to schools with a disproportionately high number of students of color, students with special needs and low-income students;

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  2. I didn’t realize you got this up first Kilroy! This is going to be huge! What does this mean for Red Clay as a school district though?

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    • kilroysdelaware

      As for Red Clay, about $100,000.00 in legal fees. Delaware charter schools must end the preferences and have open admission with open transparent lottery system. But that is up to the state legislators!

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  3. protectliberty

    In my opinion, this is the beginning of the end for the high performing charter schools in DE. In order to receive federal dollars, charter schools will also be forced to teach and test to the Common Core standards which are lower then what these schools currently teach and achieve. As for Red Clay, it will loose it’s current competitive advantage as schools such as the Charter School of Wilmington will be forced to focus less on high academic scores.

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    • I think “the beginning of the end for the high performing charter schools in DE” is more or less the idea–in the sense that they won’t be able to continue business as usual. They can offer tracks for the highest achieving kids, if they can continue to attract them, but they will (I hope) have a harder time excluding less high achieving students. They will have to do what public schools do, which is to find ways of meeting the needs of a range of students, to the best of their ability as resources allow. This will make the discrepancies between our regular & selective public schools much smaller. Those discrepancies have been crippling to the actual public schools (those available to all residents & taxpayers). The current system has stark inequities, and has flown in the face of federal civil rights law since it began with CSW. This complaint aims to address that, by calling in federal oversight.

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    • Why were other schools of choice which use admissions criteria (e.g., magnets; votechs) left out of this ACLU complaint?

      Why weren’t “schools within a school” in various districts across the State part of this complaint? AP programs? IB programs? ECP programs? So-called “academies”?

      Why was this complaint brought against the authorizers who act once every five years, rather than against the very schools who actually perform the admissions practices and the cultures in question?

      Why was this complaint brought conveniently three weeks after elections?

      Publius

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    • I agree with Eve’s comments throughout (on protected classes, disproportionate impact – isn’t this what the OCR addresses, which is why it’s what the complaint addresses?).

      Though I do have to admit I think it is fair to ask why charters as the target, or why specific charters, when there are many inequity-fostering practices across the school landscape, like the ones Publius mentions, but also both sides of the discipline/safety coin – so beyond test scores.

      I wonder if the requested investigation happens, if it would consider all of that? We’ve brewed up a hot mess and charters just seem to float to the top of it in terms of issues…since the deepest problems – which charters were initially conceived of to address – do seem to have been entrenched by them. With the community polarized and the authorities unresponsive, that’s for the possible requested investigation to determine.

      But what is so convenient about the timing…? I feel like I should but totally don’t get that…

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    • I don’t think anything in this complaint precludes addressing magnets (for ex.) on similar grounds. This is one legal complaint pointing to some stark engines of disparate opportunity in DE’s public ed. landscape. The goal is to persuade federal OCR that DE DOE is not fulfilling its obligation to guarantee equal opportunity to students regardless of race or special need–a guarantee that DE DOE commits to each time it receives federal dollars. Once OCR begins paying attention to our screwy public school demographics and the laxity of DE DOE & RC in enforcing civil rights compliance, they might start to ask about Cab (for ex.) as well. And of course it’s possible that other complaints of this nature will be submitted to address the other issues that Publius raises. DE charters are not the only culprits, but legally they’re the low-hanging fruit (at least in the case of the three this report focuses on: Newark, Wilmington & Sussex charters).

      Had DE DOE exercised due diligence on the many occasions in which it had clear opportunity to do so, no federal intervention would be called for. It is, by this point, very clear that none of the relevant DE authorities will act unless they are hounded by bigger dogs.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “And of course it’s possible that other complaints of this nature will be submitted to address the other issues that Publius raises.”

      Not in a million years. Does not fit the narrative. Not for the People’s Republic of Delaware, not for Komrade Duncan’s empire. Alinsky would never hear of it! Remember, grasshopper, you must isolate your target. You can’t do that if it’s all over the map, if for no other reason than you must make up too many lies to keep up with. The Patron Saint represents the very best of evil, but I admit to his genius in so doing.

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  4. John Kowalko says:
    December 3, 2014 at 2:50 pm

    Just finished attending the announcement that the ACLU and Community Legal Aid Society are arguing in a complaint to the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights. Good news is that it is certainly about time this situation gets public exposure. Bad news is that many of these things could have been and should be addressed by the State legislature. Recalculating the pupil-funding formula to more pronouncedly follow the needs of the individual student diversity is the most complex and resource ( read: $$$) demanding issue that should be tackled by law change. But a lower hanging fruit that should be immediately addressed by lawmakers is the need for charter school law reform as regards the 5 mile radius exemption that charters are permitted to use that, (in most cases), closes all access to that school. Case in point is the recently granted Newark Charter School expansion to a high school level populated by students and siblings who have matriculated from the K-8 population currently attending with vacancies privileged to a lottery bound by the 5 mile radius allowance.
    This is a very serious situation that I pointed out at the hearings on Newark Charter HS (pre-expansion granting by DOE and State Board) and tried to amend HB 165 to remedy. All Wilmington matriculating 8th graders in Christina have the limited option of choicing into Christiana H.S., Newark H.S. or Glasgow H.S. since there are no other high schools (Christina District) in the city. They are bused into the suburbs but are denied access to the 4th Newark area high-school “Newark Charter” due to the 5 mile radius entitlement enjoyed by Newark Charter. This has resulted in one of the most serious exclusionary realities in a publicly funded (taxpayer funded) “alleged” public school that is manifested in a distorted lack of racial, socially-economic and special needs diversity that is, by any measure, comparable to the existing diversity in those aforementioned three Christina District high schools that are located within the five mile radius restriction enjoyed by Newark Charter.
    As legislators, our failure to remedy this defect in the law speaks poorly of our commitment to equal access to publicly/taxpayer funded institutions such as “public schools” are defined.
    I intend to again address this discriminatory and exclusionary policy with legislation and perhaps the ACLU and CLASI legal action can give my colleagues the necessary impetus to remedy the situation.
    John Kowalko

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Bad news is that many of these things could have been and should be addressed by the State legislature.”

      You know, those guys over there, those elected representatives, them guys, you know, down in Dover.

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    • The 5 mile boundary isn’t excluding the people who live in the 5 mile boundary, is it? Is the Left Rep right? If it/it is, that is a problem. We should form a Legislative task force to investigate this right away. The Legislature should come out of recess to address this travesty. Better yet, let’s form a coalition of volleyball coaches who are hypersensitive to what is “inside” a boundary and what is “outside”. Experts rule.

      Isn’t NCS (Kowalko’s albatross) located behind a light industrial park adjacent to the Elkton Road truck route? Yes, I can see the elitism in that. We should NOT be giving preference to people who live within 5 miles of industrial parks and truck routes. Shameful.

      Let’s force NCS to relocate to Greenville so they can properly be accused of exclusion and elitism. With the right Greenville location, NO ONE will live within its 5 mile circle other than a few millionaires and a few Hereford cows. Residents (and cows) who won’t use the school anyway.

      Or maybe we could force certain Albatross-ees through some compulsory courses in homework, facts, rational arguments and civility. Saul Alisnky will not meet the “specific interest” of this remedial course and should be summarily relegated to the back of the line.

      Publius

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  5. Ignoring your snark. Even you must have the intellectual capacity to realize that I have only one vote although others have joined. Hopefully that group will grow with the type of pressure and awareness applied by the ACLU and CLASI action. Kudos to them for actually getting engaged rather than sitting at the keyboard hoping to sound clever.
    John Kowalko

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  6. Can someone explain this part to me.
    “Providing additional funding to schools with a disproportionately high number of students of color”
    And, whether or not you can explain it, would you be willing to show that statement to a black teenager?

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    • Where did you see this quote?

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    • OK, I found it. The quote you cite is from the ACLU press release (i.e., PT Barnum). But the actual complaint (i.e., the only thing which OCR will look at) conveniently re-words it as follows:

      “Compel the State of Delaware to ensure that schools with higher than average percentages of low income and students of color receive additional funding to offset the money and talent siphoned by charter schools.”

      Wow. Does ACLU realy want to equate “low income” with “students of color”? No exceptions? Who exactly is the “Talent” and how is talent defined? What exactly is the “Money” they are talking about which is being “siphoned” off? And how exactly does a charter school “Siphon” work? Is it mechanical, or metaphysical? How exactly will we calculate tha amount of “siphoned” money (as opposed to not-siphoned money) so that we will know what to give to low income students and to students of color?

      Or maybe we should just make up the estimate? And the standards. From whole cloth? Yeah, thaats the ticket.

      Publius

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    • Joanne Christian

      I hear ya Pmom! Just like when we have Title 1 night and invite those families on the marquee out front!!!!! Oh and the disadvantaged Christmas party, where Santa gives out the toys to the very school they are collected in……!!! And then…….let’s FACEBOOK it!!

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  7. I wouldn’t get in an uproar over this complaint, no matter what your position, because this brief is pretty damn week. The racial component is poorly argued (why are not Asians people of color?) and the disability component is NEVER actually argued in the brief, yet the disability sections of ADA 504 are what are cited as the prime authority for OCR to order changes.

    Were I an attorney for DEDOE and RCCSD I would have no qualms about defending my client from this brief.

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    • I know we’ve chatted offline about this Steve, but I think the genie has been let out of the bottle with this one. I’ve linked my article about this to many other states facebook pages and many people are shocked Delaware has gotten away with this for as long as they have. When I saw the comments on Delawareonline’s Facebook page last night, I was amazed at all the hate, racism, and discrimination. I never thought I would say this, but Delaware appears to be stuck in some timewarp. Yes, these things are going on all over, but many DE citizens (mostly white) seem to be dead set against any change to the system. Not because they are complacent, but because they do not want the “mix” so to speak. It’s a sad world we live in when people have to be so ugly to each other.

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    • I think DE’s cultural problem, at this point, is that state authorities (esp DOE) have led parents to believe that they are entitled to publicly funded, non-public schools. This is a DE fantasy, but many families have come to believe in it and are very angered by any suggestion that it may be taken away. Ideally they would not have been misled in the first place, but here we are. DE DOE has been out of compliance with federal law on these issues since the mid-90s. (It was only IN compliance for about 17 years, after 1954.)

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  8. This isn’t a court briefing, in my understanding. It is a claim (“complaint”) to the OCR (exec. branch) asking them to examine whether DE DOE complies with the civil rights protections that it agrees to enforce in return for federal $ (e.g. race to the top funds, Title I). Different genre and standard of proof than a court proceeding, I believe. That choice was quite deliberate.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Curious on your thoughts of the wording.
      “honey, your school is going to get more money because there are mostly black students there”. That’s just a lovely message(not!!) for kids (of any race) to hear.

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    • Of course the real issue is discrimination against poor students. This country has no legal protections for the poor–there is nothing barring discrimination against them if communities can get away with it politically. However, if the poor in your area happen to be predominately minorities and/or special needs students, then discrimination against them is barred by laws that protect THOSE two classes of U.S. citizens (dating from the Civil Rights era–which feels like ancient history but was not so long ago!).

      My children are young (1st & 5th grade), but they understand this fine.

      Liked by 2 people

    • lastDEconservative

      “My children are young (1st & 5th grade), but they understand this fine.”

      Sigh. I hope Eve gets a property tax rebate since her kid’s’ schools need not provide the full State specified dosage of indoctrination. In fact, she should get a deal like my neighbor with the solar electric system I helped pay for; to wit., he gets not only a subsidy, he gets PAID for trickling some back into the system. It’s heartbreaking enough to see those raised in the new USA (United in a State of Aggrievement) marching on TV (or didn’t you notice that 2/3 of the rabble disrupting NYC last night were white millenials (AKA Participation Trophy Generation)), but to come name-wise close to them? Painful.

      Take heed Pmom, what you need to tell your young’uns is that the world they confront is littered with destroyers that bleat such messages as you rightly denigrate, determined to make wrong right, and that THEIR generation will either be ruled by their progeny, completing the spiral to oblivion, or by their sweet selves who know better, know the difference, and are willing to stand, empowered by you and your husband and a few fellow villagers. Godspeed.

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    • “Of course the real issue is discrimination against poor students. This country has no legal protections for the poor–there is nothing barring discrimination against them if communities can get away with it politically. However, if the poor in your area happen to be predominately minorities and/or special needs students, then discrimination against them is barred by laws that protect THOSE two classes of U.S. citizens (dating from the Civil Rights era–which feels like ancient history but was not so long ago!).” — oh so it’s nothing about discrimination of minorities, even though it says ‘students of color’.. ohh, so they found a loophole!

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    • The “loophole” is one OCR advises national ed. administrators to be aware of–that policies having the indirect effect of disadvantaging racial minorities will be considered violations of civil rights law, even if the explicit engine of discrimination is not itself racial (but rather wealth, for ex.). See
      http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-resourcecomp-201410.pdf

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    • lastDEconservative

      Shorter Eve: there is no part of the language that cannot be tortured into compliance with our goal of forcing the population into compliance unto destruction.

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    • Talk about tortured language. Yikes.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Shorter pandora: “Idiot.”

      And the prosecution rests.

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    • Joanne Christian

      OCR is only an opinion to weaken or strengthen a case. Usually filed concommitantly with the courts. Takes FOREVER for the read–and can really hold up things for those wanting something out of it.

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  9. lastDEconservative

    So much bloviating and posturing goes on here that it’s easy to miss a gemstone lying in the desert sands of words.

    Publius beat me to this world class comment, which those with an ounce of discernment (few they be among the denizens) recognize as worthy of the “what’s really going on here?” label.

    Thanks, dude(tte).

    “Why were other schools of choice which use admissions criteria (e.g., magnets; votechs) left out of this ACLU complaint?
    Why weren’t “schools within a school” in various districts across the State part of this complaint? AP programs? IB programs? ECP programs? So-called “academies”?
    Why was this complaint brought against the authorizers who act once every five years, rather than against the very schools who actually perform the admissions practices and the cultures in question?”
    _______________________

    Hello, Aggrieved CLU. Care (Dare) to respond? 3d Party Kowalko?

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    • This is actually a damn good question. I was talking about Polytech in Kent County with someone yesterday. He explained to me it used to always be a school where kids would go to learn vocational skills if they weren’t going to go to college, back when it was on the property of Del Tech. Nowadays, it is the cream of the crop in Kent County. I remember when I was a para at Campus Community and they were closing the high school, many students wanted to transfer to Polytech, but I think you had to have at least an 80-85% average to get in. This was also the same time as the suicide cluster there. An argument could be made for including them in this complaint. I must admit, I don’t know much about the magnets up north. I think when you start talking about “schools within a school” like AP programs and whatnot, that would be tough to prove. The charters have definitely reaped what they have sown, and ANY school that has done the same should be included in this complaint. I’m an equal opportunity equity seeker!

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    • lastDEconservative

      “This is actually a damn good question.”

      On behalf of Publius the Observer, and my humble self, RePoster …

      — fainting —

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    • Here’s a crazy idea. Let’s fix the elementary schools and hold parents accountable and then let’s fix the middle schools and hold parents accountable and then more kids will get that 80% score!!
      Kevin said: ” I think when you start talking about “schools within a school” like AP programs and whatnot, that would be tough to prove.”
      How is it tough to prove how many special needs, low income, and ‘students of color’ are in AP classes. And, is AP a program? I thought it was college level classes. But the Cambridge program, yes that is more like a ‘school within a school’ and I hear people compare it to CSW all the time. How would it be hard to prove how many special needs, low income, and ‘students of color’ are in Cambridge Program? I get the feeling it isn’t really about that anyway!

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    • How do you hold parents accountable? People keep saying this but never say how it would work. And who gets to set the bar for parent involvement?

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    • Doesn’t Delaware have a law banning spanking? How is it we can figure out how to hold parents accountable for things like spanking but not for making sure their kid does their damn homework?

      “And who gets to set the bar for parent involvement?” – Who sets the bar on how parents can discipline their kids? I bet people get the police called on them for not having their kids dressed warmly enough in the winter or for yelling too loudly at them.
      Seriously, how is it that we’ve turned into such an embarrassing nanny state, but when it comes to education…nothing? Why? Is it on purpose? It’s starting to seem so.

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    • So… you didn’t say how you’d enforce parent involvement or what the penalties would be or what constitutes parent involvement.

      Would there be fines for a child not doing their math homework? What if it’s done, but it’s incorrect, or partially done? – would that result in a half fine? What if a child failed a test? Can we cite lack of parent involvement?

      Would we need to put cameras in people’s home to make sure they are involved?

      Should we mandate how many hours a day a parent must be involved?

      Sounds ridiculous, no? Citing laws that cover abuse and neglect (everyone’s read senate bill 234, right?) as if they’re the same as parent involvement is ridiculous. But until someone actually explains how parent involvement would be implemented and enforced it’s just an empty phrase… that merely sounds good.

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    • lastDEconservative

      In acting, one must -always- “hit the cue.” In usual Oscar worthy form, pandora never fails to please. Accusations and demands against anyone (as Pmom displays form par excellence this day) who dare wield logic or common sense against the evil built on falsehoods and bad intentions -must- be promptly and repeatedly (pandora’s magnum opus is “repeatedly”) maligned, dismissed and impugned.

      In the real world, it’s the Pmoms that will make the difference if the battle is to be won. Yes, to your rhetorical question, mom, it IS on purpose, all of it. And that purpose is in violation of all you hold dear. Those that would eliminate the last vestiges of parental involvement (and responsibility) they’ve not already, will fight you tooth and nail. pandora by herself is not, but well represents the legions, unfailingly. Keep up the good practice, keep directing your own on the right path.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “I get the feeling it isn’t really about that anyway!”

      A dagger to the heart of the destroyers. Discernment. Recognition of ‘what’s really going on’ has either happened, or is moments away.

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    • Shorter lastDEconservative: I can’t answer the questions.

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    • lastDEconservative

      “Shorter lastDEconservative: I can’t answer the questions.”

      ROTFLMAO!!

      Wha’d I say? Move over Liz Taylor! Liz Taylor? Move over Old Faithful!!

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    • Joanne Christian

      Because magnets remain wholly part of a district, hence funded and governed by district. Vo-tech have always enjoyed their special line item place in the budget–right or wrong–and can effectively prove they have something for everyone…..

      Whereas, Red Clay HAS CHARTERED (oh geez, I’m having an interruption, so these names and facts may be misassigned, but you’ll get my drift) thru either CAB or WCS or allowed space for them under their aegis–public funds and buildings. They have subordinated themselves probably as an agent of the state, with the separate formation of a charter/magnet governing body. They essentially have given tacit approval to the selection criteria for those schools, when really they can’t because they remain still a public school, operating under a greater umbrella of the Red Clay District.

      Like this–I own an apartment building. My lease management company decides they aren’t renting to anyone under 30. State comes for me too, as owner of that property who has to uphold fair housing laws etc..

      Moral of the story….if you want to charter…..get your own, unentangled property, secure your board, establish your funding, just like all of this was SUPPOSED to be, and then YOU TOO can play the charter game without the real or supposed accusations of favortism, cronyism, elitism, fair-hair childism, exclusion, bias, and high treason the WHOLE Red Clay school district is having to endure. If you charter, magnetize, or lend to them–you are RESPONSIBLE for them.

      Does that help? 🙂

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    • Joanne Christian

      Answered you elsewhere in the thread Big Guy.

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    • Actually I think there are rules in schools that would help teachers be able to do the job they are there to do. Rules about fighting, rules about cell phone use during class, rules about showing up on time, dress code rules, etc. etc. etc. I guess the problem is that their hands are tied about actually inforcing those rules.. and yeah, for the longer version, see Joannes comment. Untie the hands of teachers. Maybe the parents involvement could just be as little as helping teachers in that department. Johnny gets his phone taken away for having it out during class, don’t call and demand he gets it back.

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  10. LDC: thanks for the recognition!

    Pencadermom: you are right on.

    Kevin O: AP has been object of OCR investigation before. It is only tough to investigate when the school or district is opaque about the participants.

    Pandora: Who gets to set the bar for parent involvement? ACLU appears to be vying for the right — to set it low.

    Publius

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  11. No dog in this fight

    Buckley: “I think “the beginning of the end for the high performing charter schools in DE” is more or less the idea …

    How pathetic is that!!?? Delaware has a school that works, that no right-thinking person thinks is discriminating, that hundreds of people want their children to attend, yet some wrong-thinking people (like Buckley) want to shut it down. This is the ultimate “leveling-down” in public education. If this school is shut down or drastically changed, Delaware should hang its collective head in shame.

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