Red Clay is reviewing their magnet and charter schools admission policies and you have a voice!

The previous blog post is from Mike O of the seventh type blog. Board member Kenny Rivera was successful in convincing the other board members to establish a review committee. 

Here and over at seventh type blog you have an opportunity to weigh in on the issue and I am quite sure some Red Clay folks are looking in.

Here is something I posted back in February  Red Clay’s Conrad Choice process seriously FLAWED Posted on  by kilroysdelaware and this which I’ve been updating data since Conrad continues to shed black students Posted on  by kilroysdelaware. First post was back in 2011 Careful how you yell success in school turnaround Posted on  by kilroysdelaware.

As far as Charter School of Wilmington, by now you’ve heard all sides of the argument.

In case you didn’t know, one of Red Clay’s chartered Delaware College Preparatory Academy is hanging by a thread. In June we’ll hear a call for closure or more probation? I am calling it closure! 

Red Clay is the only school district in Delaware to have charter schools, magnet schools, traditional schools and has an aggressive Choice school program.

Should Red Clay charter schools be exclusively Red Clay students?

Should Red Clay magnet schools be exclusively Red Clay students?

Should all Red Clay charter schools and magnet schools have admission process that mirrors the same process it uses for it’s Choice school program? 

5 responses to “Red Clay is reviewing their magnet and charter schools admission policies and you have a voice!

  1. Kathy von Duyke

    I don’t understand why there’s a section in the middle of Wilmington that is considered Christina district when the area is so close to Red Clay. Why, when there is an excellent school district next door, do families and kids have to come all the way to Newark? Why not send the kids to nearby schools and use the funds saved on transportation for some awesome after school activities? How many years have Wilmington kids had to take long bus rides, and does this have any affect on their educational outcomes? Can you explain the history and political ins and outs of this please – I’m completely mystified.

    Cheers,
    Kathy

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    • unappreciatedteacher

      Kathy – here is a summary of why Wilmington is split up among the districts: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desegregation_busing#Wilmington.2C_Delaware

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    • Kathy von Duyke

      Thanks for the wikipedia link – so interesting to see Wilmington there. From that I gather Red Clay is balanced racially, and in order to send Wilmington students to desegregated schools – they have to be bused to Newark. I guess this is to keep students from segregation by the city demographics?

      I had read that Cincinnati Ohio developed the first Montessori High school as a magnet school and changed the city demographics as parents from the suburbs moved their students into the city in order to attend the school, while city dwellers benefitted from a great school that is sensitive to student’s needs and interests. The school doesn’t seem to have any of the enrollment procedures meant to gate out poor and often diverse students – see here: http://gamblemontessorihs.cps-k12.org/academics.aspx which seems to be a completely different approach.

      Why can’t we the state commit to creating a really great school in Wilmington? There’s an argument for it here from ten years ago: http://www.udel.edu/johnmack/research/op_ed_feb04.PDF

      Three charter models have folded trying to come into Wilmington, in part it seems because the charter process is built on a minimum enrollment and because the models are unknown to parents, that minimum was not met by three schools. The Montessori high school in Ohio started as an elementary school and parents wanted more of the same for their children. It would seem that a high school would have to be allowed to open with a much smaller enrollment – perhaps added on to another high school to allow the model to build over time; or, emerge from an elementary model that can continue into high school. Kuumba academy seems to be a hopeful option down the road for building an excellent high school in Wilmington, one that is likely to attract all ethnicities.

      But the question should be – how is it that low income and minority students are doing well at Kuumba and Cincinnati Montessori schools awhile not so much in district schools within the same cities? I would suggest its about the respectful, welcoming, personalized approach, and emphasis on cultural enrichment that these school take towards students.

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  2. Kathy, go read the DeSeg articles on Delawareonline.com. They should be easy to find, they ran just this last weekend.

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    • Kathy von Duyke

      Hi Elizabeth,
      I have been following those stories, and I looked through them again. One of the lines that struct me are that – teachers prefer to teach in classrooms that aren’t segregated, and — all students perform better with desegregated and excellent environments. I’ve also been following the short film clips about Wilmington, that one neighborhood had 0 high school graduates. But I must have missed the one about districting or references to it. I would really like more information.

      Cheers,
      Kathy

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