Newark Charter School diversity outreach a success

Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity

  2012-13 2013-14

African American

11.2%

11.0%

American Indian

0.1%

0.2%

Asian

12.5%

13.4%

Hispanic/Latino

4.2%

4.0%

White

66.0%

65.8%

Multi-Racial

5.9%

5.6%

 

Other Student Characteristics

  2012-13 2013-14

English Language Learner

3.0%

2.7%

Low Income

17.2%

17.7%

Special Education

6.8%

5.7%

Enrolled for Full Year

99.2%

N/A

But wow! look at March 2014 board minutes:

New Business

a. Kindergarten admissions issue was brought up to make the board aware. Three students whose parents applied for kindergarten admissions are already enrolled in and currently attending kindergarten programs. Based upon the admissions policy, these applicants were determined to be ineligible for application to NCS kindergarten. All three families were notified

So three kindergartners getting the booth? Click here to hear audio of board meeting.

14 responses to “Newark Charter School diversity outreach a success

  1. Pencadermom

    I clicked but it was not audio. It was written. Does the audio explain in better detail? Does it sound like someone getting the boot to you? The written part doesn’t. It sounds like someone whose kid is already in kindergarten somewhere else, applied for NCS kindergarten.. so the kid would do kindergarten twice. It’s a new one to me, but I could see it happening. You apply when your kid is 4 going on 5 for kindergarten.. they don’t get picked, so you try again the following year, when your kid is supposed to be going into first grade but you don’t care if they do kindergarten over again if it means they can get into the school that way. If it did go down like that, it sounds fair that they would put a stop to it.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Always count on you to prove a point 🙂 There is no recording and if there were we would know the facts. However, it is odd, “Based upon the admissions policy, these applicants were determined to be ineligible for application to NCS kindergarten. All three families were notified” If they enrolled twice it would be a matter of correcting the record but yea I can kind of see what you are saying. But still puzzling, “these applicants were determined to be ineligible for application to NCS kindergarten.” Could be they lived outside the 5 mile radius by three feet 🙂 joking :).

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    • Pencadermom

      I know a lot of things people have done to get their kid into a school.. from putting a family members address as your own, to signing up for the YMCA after-school program because the school only allowed choicing from families who needed the after school care that was provided at certain schools, to renting an apartment in a district you want (gotta pay but more affordable than private school) – ok, that one I don’t know if anyone did but my husband and I talked about doing it a few years back 🙂
      I even know a mom who was going to give her mom guardianship of her daughter because she lived in the district they wanted.
      But if these families tried to do what it looks like they did (to me) by applying for NCS for kindergarten (because it’s really the only time you can get in) when their kid really is going into the first grade, well that’s pure genius!!

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    • John Young

      and thid behavior is good for the whole of public education how?

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    • Pencadermom

      huh? whose behaviour? individual families who try to scam the system? No one said it was ok or good. Just stating stories I’ve heard.

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  2. Kilroy, even if there were audio, discussions of specific families would be excluded and held in executive session. I suspect that the families were found to be ineligible for other reasons (perhaps residency), not because they were already registered somewhere else.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      I understand they can’t mention names but still could have be more specific in the minutes. I am thinking the same re: resident. Bit in the big picture if true at least we know they a monitoring the issue. Maybe they tried to use grandma’s address and got busted.

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  3. The news is that the low income numbers are finally published. For NCS, the outreach results are significant, but are a mixed bag, especially when compared with 2011-12, which is the year Sec. Lowery cited to issue her conditional approval of NCS expansion and creating the outreach plan.

    Remember at NCS, the cohort is basically the same all the way through, so K is where you should see effects of outreach.

    Kindergarten low-income enrollment is up since 2011-12, which is a good sign. But overall low income enrollment is down to 17.7%, from 21.3% in 2011-12.

    Black/white enrollment is nearly unchanged, but they seem to have taken a few more Asian kids.

    So NCS is basically taking more poorer white kids. Alternatively, the “outreach” could be taking the form of better reporting – i.e., encouraging new applicants to fully report anything that would support their low income status.

    Interestingly, the mid to upper grades seem to be slightly increasing their incomes since 2011-12 . Remember they are the same families, so apparently their fortunes are improving.

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    • Another thing I forgot to mention: I understand that DOE’s method of identifying low-income students has changed this year, although I don’t understand exactly how it is done now. So the increase in NCS-K low-income enrollments could potentially be explained entirely by the new methodology rather than outreach.

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    • In reply to Mike, based then on the demographic evidence (more poor white kids) posted above, it will mean that if NWS scores don’t rise again this year, it will be one more ounce of proof that poverty is the all in all determinator of standardized scores…..

      Searching for other variables and finding none, I must say this is a rather cleanly controlled experiment.

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    • Pencadermom

      are kindergartners tested?

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  4. Two Delaware students have been named 2014 U.S. Presidential Scholars.

    U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced Monday Abhishek Rao of Newark, who attends Caravel Academy in Bear, and Josephine Chu of Wilmington, who attends Tower Hill School in Wilmington

    I find it funny that the USDOE is celebrating kids who arent even in the government system

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    • Pencadermom

      Isn’t it this?: “The U.S. Presidential Scholars Program was established in 1964, by executive order of the President, to recognize and honor some of our nation’s most distinguished graduating high school seniors. In 1979, the program was extended to recognize students who demonstrate exceptional talent in the visual, creative and performing arts. Each year, up to 141 students are named as Presidential Scholars, one of the nation’s highest honors for high school students.”
      If so, why would it matter what school they go to? Are they not citizens of the U.S.? Do their parents not pay taxes? What’s the problem?

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    • Alsonewarkmom

      But how could Arne possibly evaluate their success. They don’t take standardized tests :).

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