Red Clay’s Conrad Choice process seriously FLAWED

Click Here to Apply (grades 6-12) >>>>  ON-LINE CHOICE APPLICATION 

INTERVIEW / ASSESSMENT APPOINTMENTSA student interview (@10 minutes) and writing assessment (@30 minutes) is a required component of the application process for:

  • all applicants to high school

  • in District applicants to middle school. 

Out of District applicants for grades 6-8 will only be interviewed if seats become available after the pool of qualified in District students is given 1st preference. 

If you do not sign up for an interview at one of the two Choice Open Houses, you will be contacted by email from Deborah McMahon with an interview date and time.  Due to the increased volume of applications, Conrad will not be able to reschedule the appointment if the student is unable to attend. 

Saturday Interview Dates: December 7th& 14th and January 11th & 25th. 

Please bring to the Interview copies that we may keep of the student’s: 

  • Current year’s report card

  • Previous year’s report card

  • Spring Standardized test scores (DSTP, DCAS, Terranova, CAT, MAP, etc.)

  • Student work from science class (project, poster, test, homework, etc.)

A 12-point rubric is used to determine an applicant’s minimum interest and aptitude in the school’s magnet.  Points are accumulated as follows:

  • 2.5 GPA in Math/Science 2012/13 SY             2 points

  • 2.5 GPA in Math/Science 2013/14 1st MP       2 points

  • Last Year’s Attendance                                      1 point

  • Standardized Test- Math Proficiency              2 points

  • Creative/Persuasive Writing Sample              2 points

  • Inquiring/Interesting Interview                           3 points

Students living in the former Conrad feeder receive an extra point on the rubric. 

Students earning 10 points or more are placed in a random lottery and follow district policy for Student Choice Selection Criteria.

Why should a student be required to reapply twice, once for middle school grade level and another for high school level using the same application metrics? At best, all students should be required to maintain a minimum of 2.5 GPA and meet behavior / discipline standards. Also, at best all current Conrad students moving from middle school 8th grade to high school 9th grade be required to submit and opt-in or opt-out form no question asked. The full re-application process is unneeded and unwarranted. I am not sure the number of current 8th grade students applying to 9th are rejected and I assume very few. Doesn’t make sense and is not fair and allow for cherry-picking for the high school component

Students living in the former Conrad feeder receive an extra point on the rubric. 

Clarification is needed here! Prior to to establishment of Conrad magnet school there was no Conrad High School and in fact because Wilmington High was the old Conrad Middle School feeder-pattern school those students were given a extra preference to Charter School of Wilmington because “Red Clay school board” closed WHS and gave the space to CSW. Red Clay “school board” needs to get off it’s ass and either justify why the double application process or declare the Conrad middle school a traditional school not a magnet. Playing bullshit double enrollment games may be defacing the the Neighborhood Schools Act that requires students to attend the closest school. Because the old Conrad failed to meet federal standards it was required to reorganized. However, one could question moving neighborhood students to school further away whereas the intent was to address internal deficiencies failing students within. In the the big picture nothing was done to serve those students other than bus them further from home to other Red Clay middle schools. Giving students living in the former feeder-pattern 1 extra point is far from a preference. The data does reveal a decline in African-American and Hispanic student attendance which is a direct result of reassignment of feeder-patterns.

Red Clay schools should be for “Red Clay” students and if we want to have magnet schools the doors should swing open for all and at best maintaining a minimum GPA and behavior / discipline standard should be the prime factor maintaining a seat in Conrad. So Conrad should be 100% Red Clay students until a point where no Red Clay student wishes to attend.

The tactful board vote to end the ELL program at Conrad was shameful because the vote was really about purging a program that serves many at-risk ELL students where as their academic achievement or lack of  poses a negative impact on Conrad’s overall rating. Conrad “failed” to make AYP last year and cannot afford to slip-back. The entire ELL inclusion plan might have been a mask to address a Conrad agenda.You did notice Red Clay school board pulled the middle school ELL program as one question and voted on that question. If there were sincerity to the intent of ELL inclusion it would be a multiple question or vote. The board was manipulated by the district to vote as separate questions.  

84 responses to “Red Clay’s Conrad Choice process seriously FLAWED

  1. What Conrad says:

    Out of District applicants for grades 6-8 will only be interviewed if seats become available after the pool of qualified in District students is given 1st preference.

    What you say:

    Conrad should be 100% Red Clay students until a point where no Red Clay student wishes to attend.

    Since the principal at Conrad told me (when my grandson was being interviewed) that they were interviewing several hundred (I can’t recall the exact number but it was in the 600-800 range) more RCCSD students than they had spots for, it would seem to me that these two statements are functionally and statistically the same.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      I agree sieve and one would think than there is no out of district students in Conrad 6-8.

      Also, I would guess the number of 8th grade students no mustarding process for 9th grade is few.

      ELL thing , if the board says no or district withdraws ELL inclusion they should rescind middle school ELL vote made in at January’s meeting. I am very suspicious.

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    • give me a break

      No out of district 6-8 graders…. depending on who you know!!!!

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  2. I would guess the number of 8th grade students no mustarding process for 9th grade is few.

    True, but they can always ketchup later.

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  3. Not sure how this breaks down, but it looks like Conrad has 218 out-of-district choice students. Does that seem right?

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    • Yes–i have 226 and 404 for CAB–looks like RC children are not qualified. Have to remember RC property owners pay all capital cost, when you include CSW that’s millions. My understanding is local funds are for RC children, clearly school board does not agree.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Could be but it would be nice to know the grade level. Do keep in mind Red Clay will still pay capital improvement cost and out of district students bring increased operational funds.

      My big point about Conrad is why the need to reapply for high school rather than opt-out? Then the neighborhood schools Act question. Why did DE DOE approve allowing Red Clay to reassign old feeder-pattern student (middle school) rather than leaving it to them to opt-out rather then choice-in? Then again our minority leaders sit on the sideline clueless. .

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    • Is there a way to see the break-down by grade level? I thought just in the last year or two they stopped taking out of district kids unless there were still openings, so it should be that the majority of the out of district students would be juniors or seniors.

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  4. Looks tome like minority leaders are going the charter route. Why not?

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  5. Gee, everyone complains that charters are creaming… Looks like it swings both ways…

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    • Choice in RC has some bad consequences, creates high poverty schools and cost millions to property owners.

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    • Charters do cream. So do black exclusionary schools. The public schools get everything else. You still wind up with good white schools and bad black schools.

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    • It doesn’t swing both ways. It’s academic segregation. But if you somehow feel okay with this… more power to you.

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    • Pandora has her crab claws out today. God forbid students doing well should have access to opportunities to improve themselves. That should be limited to only those politically correct demographics she feels “deserve” educational opportunities.

      Let’s equalize everything: Kid’s Sports teams(everybody makes the team, even disabled), automobiles (we all get to drive a Chevy (gov’t owned) volt comrade), homes (1500 S.F. house for all, regardless if you can afford it), Olympians (No tryouts, anyone can go on government dime), Politicians (oops , our current group already is equalized by gerrymandered districts and voting laws demanding there be a specific representative. My bad. Maybe that’s why they waste so much money. Pity they didn’t “cream” effective and law abiding politicians. It might have prevented stimulus monies being wasted due to fraud. Crabs have rights too.)

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    • lastDEconservative

      Call for applicants to the 87th State (note capital S) Police State recruit class announced in the NJ Friday. (you decide if I made a typo).

      How is this fair? According to the SPS website, one must be of an approved weight, a *gasp* citizen, be able to hear, be able to see, older than, younger than … sounds like the ultimate adult creaming charter school to me. Leaving what, the traditional county and town forces to provide training to those segregated out?

      And worst of all, the higher you aspire, the more qualifications you must bring! Wow, bring, not be granted, nor be given PLCs on the dime to make it look like you have additional qualifications !

      Can this be the same parent organization bringing schooling (not education) to our kids? One thing I’ll grant them, they are honest in calling it “training,” not education. And they are focused on a minority, I guess they deserve credit there, too.

      And then there’s the whole “you MUST leave at 55 and collect from the rest of us for 35 years, after 20 years of free clothing and the dry cleaning thereof.” It’s a funny thing, this whole government thing we pay for, yes?

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    • lastDEconservative

      And as for you M, all riled up again, surely you recognize yourself incapable of making decisions such as who should and shouldn’t get all the attention (read money, resources) at the expense of those selected for punishment (read taxed, capable), you and your utter absence of nuance.

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    • Publius e decere

      LDC don’t be hard on M Ryder, he/she had a great idea in there — qualifications for the pols who take our money. Something more than breathing and whining and grandstanding and litmus tests. We have many pols who would pass this “creaming” standard, but it would thankfully eliminate the few odious knuckleheads who have slipped through without such a base standard of capability.

      Publius

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    • MRyder’s comments above are a good illustration of where we’ve gone off the rails in DE, with charters. No one is telling us which cars to buy or where to live. Unless you require publicly subsidized housing (in which case you do have limited options), you can use any private assets you may have to purchase (or rent) the most suitable house or car your family can afford. The same is true in education–there are lots of private options, and you’re free to choose the most suitable one that your family can afford. In the case of K-12 education, there is an additional option funded by local taxpayers. The purpose of that is to ensure that every kid has at least one decent K-12 choice–and since early proponents of public Ed. in the U.S. saw social value in “community schools” attended by rich and poor alike, they’re not a means-tested (welfare) service.

      But if for any reason the public schls supported by your community don’t please you, you are free to pay for an alternative–roughly the same process as buying a car (for those who can afford one) or house (ditto). Communities can even build choices into their public schools (a science-heavy curriculum here, an arts-heavy one there). What should NOT be possible is to make local taxpayers support a private school–one not open equitably to all children in the community. If you prefer to impose obstacles to enrollment based on students’ wealth or behavior or parental desirability, you have to turn to the private market. Happily for those who do want a private (that is, restricted-access) school, our property taxes in this area are low–so the choice to forego the publicly funded option is somewhat less costly than it would be elsewhere.

      This is why many taxpayers object to schools like NCS. They should either remove the many barriers to enrollment (and continued attendance) that they currently impose on less-advantaged students, or they should forego taxpayer support and become fully private, supported by parents and any private foundation or corporation willing to underwrite their mission. No problem with that–we have lots of schls in the area that operate this way.

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    • Publius e decere

      If the purpose of public Ed is to have a decent option for all families then aren’t schools who fail to meet standards in turn failing to meet this public promise? Should all failing public schools — charter and TPS — be closed and the adults who work in them be “counseled out” to other occupations? We have closed several charters, so let’s close a few TPSs and get the conversation rolling.

      If public schools are supposed to be equally available for everyone regardless of effort, motivation, preparation etc. then should the funding be equal also? Yes, I suppose. How about we make property taxes $ “X” dollars for each person on the title and do away with rates based on “assessment”. Flat tax for flat results. Or maybe, to Kilroy’s credit, we just give a set amount of money to every family per student and just let them spend it on any school they wish no matter how exclusive or inclusive that school is and stop griping about which system is “entitled” to prevail.

      If the system we have in DE is “off the rails” it is only because certain opponents of change hold the key to the switchgear and they limit free and open choice. The state Switchgear Association. Let put DE oublic ed “on the rails” by eliminating such ideological and fatuous philosophies about what public ed “should” be and let’s start making it what the people choose. Full stop.

      As for the people who oppose NCS, who exactly are they other than a vocal minority? The school has a TWO THOUSAND applicant wait list. 2000 semolians! A 1000% over subscription rate. It looks to me like the opponents are frustrating a clear and present public imperative. Here is a proposal — any taxpayer who opposes free and open education choice in all regards shall pay an immediate $1000 surcharge on their tax bill. We’ll have free and open choice by sundown.

      Let’s stop lecturing each other endlessly over which system is for everyone. NO system is for “everyone” unless you are Thomas Hobson or Henry Ford and in both cases history has mocked their unitary views. Let’s get behind choice and let people choose a TPS or a charter or let them voucher their way to satisfaction.

      Let’s take our Billion Back and make taxes work for us instead of the alternative.

      Publius

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    • Sure, Publius we should improve unsatisfactory TPS’s (better than closing them). When we make that assessment, though, we need to figure out whether the school’s apparent failure–if you’re judging by test scores, for ex.–is institutional (teachers, staff) or a reflection of the challenging student population it enrolls. And we won’t improve those schools by taking away their funds.

      “If public schools are supposed to be equally available for everyone regardless of effort, motivation, preparation etc. then should the funding be equal also?” Within a taxpaying community (e.g. a district), yes of course. It’s a free country–you can move to a wealthier (generally higher tax, pricier real estate) community if you want to. But within a pool of taxpyers, equity in access to publicly funded resources is the goal. You know that we don’t have that here, with regard to the selective charters. It’s indisputable, evident in demographics, enrollment policies, imposed costs and counseling-out practices. Why don’t supporters of charters work to fix these problems, so that their preferred public schools become genuinely public options and less controversial? That’s the remarkable aspect of this whole debate: Where are the within-charter reformers of their schools’ glaring problems?

      It’s true that 2K people in the Newark area are willing to sign up for a public school that discriminates against poor children in and around their neighborhoods. Not a great reflection on this community, but many of the parents who do that are looking for what they consider the strongest option for their own children among the options that the state makes available. Many of them might still like NCS (or like it more) if it remained similar to the current school minus the barriers to entry (& to continued enrollment) for poor and special needs kids. Some wouldn’t, and of course test scores would fall in that case, so the perception of signif. difference in quality btwn the charter and surrounding TPSs would decrease–that might impact demand.

      Many area taxpayers (those without schoolchildren) still don’t understand what they’re supporting in a school like that, but in my experience they’re appalled when they find out. If we could mobilize the taxpaying households w/o children against the crazy siphoning of public resources to preferentially serve well-connected families, that would effectively close this debate, politically speaking. DE’s charter policy harms many more people than it helps. That could be changed, w/o closing the charters, by turning them into public schools.

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    • Publius e decere

      Eve,

      I commend you for your somewhat skilled use of leading statements and flawed premise fallacies. But you are wrong. Charter schools are not about wealth. They are about choice.

      In your very first paragraph you make clear your low expectations of “other people”. Not surprising, for a private school parent who has the means to opt out and does. But the charter schools you so despise are seeking a color- and income-blind meritocracy, as are their applicants.

      In your second paragraph you avoid my proposal. I asked that taxpayers pay a flat fee, NOT a fee based in the assessed value of their homes. So no matter if your property is worth ten million or ten thousand you would pay the same dollar amount into the school system. Which is consistent with your blog comment that families who have invested time and effort and stability and care must be barred from choice over the use of their public dollars. Flat tax, yes or no?

      In your third paragraph, you are clearly disappointed in the Newark community. What you have not conceded is that maybe you are in the minority opinion. Are 2000 students on waitlists at any TPSs that you know of?

      In your fourth and last paragraph you say that in your experience non-school taxpayers are appalled at what they are funding. I agree. The difference between us is the subject. I too would be appalled at funding some of the TPSs in our area. I’m not sure who you talk to, but ask any (seriously, any) Realtor about the school questions they get from potential home buyers and you will find that the majority simply want to know if they are in Red Clay or if they are within a 5-mile radius of NCS. It is a cut and dried litmus test for homebuyers. They may not have kids in school, but they know that if their home is eligible for geographic preference to these schools then they will have a more valuable property. location location location.

      Publius

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    • No flat property tax, Pub–that’s absurd. I missed your point b/c it was so puerile. We’re not talking about how families use ” their own” tax dollars. We’re talking about how they use the tax dollars it takes to send their child(ren) to an exclusionary public schl., one of the several that make inadequate effort to serve higher-needs children (or that even actively remove them from the schl). A family with two children in such a school is using their own tax $ along with those of ~9 other households to fund those tuitions. It’s the interests of those 9 families that are not being met under current policy.

      Interpreting the wait lists is interesting, b/c the people in them currently attend TPS or private schools. Many take the stance that the current landscape of genuinely public vs. exclusionary tax-funded schls is unjust, but if there’s going to be injustice they’d just as will give their kid the chance to be on the winning vs. losing end of a bad system. There are NCS parents who say the same thing. So I do ‘t think one can count all current and potential NCS (or similar–name your exclusionary DE charter here) families as in favor of the system as it stands. That’s what we’re discussing–can DE’s charter policies be improved to provide better public Ed. opportunity overall (which was the purported intent of allowing charters to begin with). I say yes, and I think many charter and wait list families agree with that, based on conversations with many such families. You think things are fine as they are and should not be altered. The clear evidence of demographic skewing doesn’t bother you–maybe it’s what you prefer in ” public” ed., I don’t know.

      It’s true that public perception of CSD is low–that’s one issue our FOCSD parents’ network is beginning to address. Much of that stems from public interpretation of test scores, w/o disaggregating those scores by student population served. Look, for example, at CSD’s current strategic plan–a few pp. in, their are graphs disaggregating test scores by income and racial groups. Non-poor, largely white and Asian, kids do quite well in CSD schls. Low-income, largely black & Latino kids (those not well represented in exclusionary charters) score much more poorly. A lot of the low public perception of districts is the result of mistakenly blaming the district for the socio-economic circs. of the students they teach. This is a tricky PR issue, and one CSD is trying to address–more work needed, no question.

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    • Eve, not being sarcastic but how do you know where the perception stems from? Why do you think it has much to do with test scores?

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    • Pmom, I don’t think it’s only test scores, but that’s one way incoming families evaluate school “quality.” It’s also anecdotal–but according to the many CSD parents enthusiastic about FOCSD, there’s a stunning disconnect btwn. public perception and CSD reality. This has been said mainly by parents at Shue, Gauger, NHS and Glasgow (both at the PTA mtngs. we’ve visited so far and by parents who attended one of the initial FOCSD mtngs.) The primary interest of that group, besides shoring up schl funding and finding ways to address class size, has been helping the district to align public perception better with the reality of what the schls offer and what students’/families’ experience actually is–according to these MS and HS parents, it’s degrees of magnitude better than what many people outside the schls seem to think. How that disconnect unfolded, I don’t know–but it’s an impt. Issue to address (as you note above, re: marketing).

      That’s a conversation FOCSD will begin to get involved in at our March 3 meeting (Newark HS, 7:00) with district marketing staff. Super. Wms. is already willing to commit more funds to district PR–it would be great to keep those $ in the classroom, but in a landscape of choice it seems essential to address perception, esp, if it’s way off base.

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    • Do a lot of parents attend PTA meetings? Even if it is a fair amount of parents who attend, it is certainly not a true sample of the parents at those schools. Come out of Newark and visit the Glasgow area some time, not just the parents who are able and willing to attend PTA meetings. 🙂

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    • Very few parents attend PTA anywhere, and the poorer the school, the fewer attend! But it’s also the case that many of the PTA-likely families who have opted out of CSD do so in part from fear (particularly fear re: 6-8 and 9-12). So I’ve been interested and surprised to find that it’s precisely those parents who core “message” at meetings organized to network CSD parents (and the message could have been anything, incl. we hate this district and have to get out–or whatever, the initial agendas were open) was “we heard all these scary things about CSD MS and HS and enrolled with trepidation, assuming we might have to leave/move–and it’s been fine, even really great, and we can’t figure out why those stories circulate so widely.” I don’t think anyone meant to say that none of the scary anecdotes are true (today’s armed Dickinson student, for ex.) but rather that they don’t remotely reflect the day to day experiences of their own children in the schools, or the academic quality, or extracurriculars–etc.

      I’m not interested in a pollyanna promostion of a district or schools that are dysfunctional. I’m interested in networking CSD parents to get a clearer sense of what is and isn’t working, and whether the problems are policy or funding-related (requiring legislative advocacy) or issues of district admin (requiring pressure on the elected board). I assume there’s a mix, and we’re certainly just getting started. But it’s frankly surprising to me that the dominant message so far has been of parents who are surprised by their own satisfaction with CSD and puzzled by what they heard previously & what many of their neighbors (not in CSD) perceive about the district’s schools. I’m not questioning the stories you’ve told, of bullying and so on–but I am interested in generating a clearer picture of the district. It’s complex, lots of schools & programs, lots of different kinds of kids & families (it’s public!). But generally bad news travels faster than good, and there’s reason for private & charter/magnet schools to emphasize district negatives–that’s their bread and butter.

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    • BTW, if you’re seriously interested in introducing us to more GHS families, to add their concerns and perspectives to the “FOCSD” dialogue I’d appreciate that. You can find my work email via UD, History Dept. There’s no question that the PTA sampling is skewed; it’s just the easiest starting point for generating some kind of cross-district parent organization. We’re looking for funds to host parent conversations in Wilm.-CSD schools (as one ex. of a necessary kind of outreach, if CSD were really to est. an effective cross-district parent network), but all of this is slow-moving (by volunteers, etc.). Assistance is welcome.

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  6. Question: Should all children living in a school district be provided equal opportunity to choice?

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    • Publius e decere

      They have it now. Not everyone rises to the challenge.

      Do you suggest that we let people who choose to choose have their way? Or maybe that we buy a Roulette Wheel and forget any sensible allocation of public resources?

      Publius

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    • Yeah Jack, if those kids can’t convince their parents to choice on their behalf, then they are incompetent children who just don’t want it bad enough. If only those children rose to that challenge then it would all be better.

      Hank cracks me the fuck up with comments like that one. Thank goodness he oversees his little rich, smart fifedom and not any real schools with real problems because he couldn’t hack reality.

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    • It would be helpful to those parents if they knew about choice. Where was Christiana High school back when NCS used to have high school night for 7th and 8th graders? How many years has CSD had choice or charter opportunities listed on their website? Where are the flyers advertising all the great programs offered? I got a flyer in the mail about Dickinson and their IB program and I don’t even live in that district! Why doesn’t the district where I live send any information about vo-tech?

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    • Publius e decere

      I guess John has to answer for that. He might also consider using more educator-like language.

      Publius

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  7. In some circumstances transportation is not provided, does this fact eliminate choice for the poor?

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    • Give me a break

      Transportation is offered within district

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    • Publius e decere

      I agree — CSD does not provide transportation for poor students from Seaford. Nor does Red Clay, Brandywine and Colonial. These districts should all be required to pay for all students statewide — or heck, let’s make it nationwide — to get to their schools everyday.

      On a more serious note, what is your point? And which schools are you singling out? What specifically are they denying to students regarding transportation? And which laws are such schools breaking? It’s your accusation, own it.

      Publius

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    • GMB, transportation is not provided in district, at least not in CSD. If you choose a school that is not your feeder, you provide your own transportation. For many kids, that eliminates within-district choice. I think the same is true in RC, but could be wrong. Ditto if you choice out of district–you need to get to a hub bus stop for the alternate district, or find your own way to the school (e.g. drive there).

      I think Jack’s recurrent point is that while we’re examining the problem of charters, why not also confront the inequities posed by other aspects of DE school choice, such as magnets and “choicing” without transportation. Fair point. Charters don’t bear the full burden of resegregation. They’re one piece of a larger choicing picture that provides myriad public opportunities for wealthier kids but not for poor ones. (Is that a fair summary of your concern, Jack?)

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    • Publius e decere

      On this point I see your view. Title 14 Section 409 says if you choice into a TPS other than your own feeder TPS then you have to get to the destination TPS school’s feeder bus route to ride in. So ask your TPS board to advocate for a change with their legislators. My guess is that this limit is there because those districts wanted it there, but I could be wrong.

      Charters get county-wide (vo-tech) transportation funding if they provide their own transportation, or they can ask their local district to provide it at district cost (which the district gets state money for) on a district-wide basis in lieu of the charter getting the funding,

      So in this transportation context, charters currently offer more choice-for-all than TPSs do.

      Publius

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    • I love the Publius can say, with a straight face presumably, that charters with a myriad of special interest clauses offer “more choice-for-all” that TPS.

      Truly delusional.

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    • They also get to keep unused busing monies for parents that drop their kids off. Gee, I wonder how many charters “strongly encourage” parents via the application process and orchestrated peer pressure to NOT ride the bus.

      Imagine if you did this in a 5-mile radius? Oh wait, just look at the DE checkbook for NCS.

      Let the attacks begin!

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    • Peer pressure to not put your kids on the bus? Seriously? LOL. OMG, that is a stretch, even for you John. From the looks in my neighborhood, it looks like CSD encourages not riding the bus.. maybe that’s why they show up late so often.

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    • $$ doesn’t lie PM. Over $100K in PROFIT turned by NCS for busing alone, with zero mandate on how to spend the overage (read profit).

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    • So they figured out how to save money. Money that can be used for things needed for kids? My main point was that they didn’t do it by pressuring parents to drive their kids as it sounded like you were implying.

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    • save money? OK< show us where it goes. Oh wait, they don't have to, so they don't.

      Add it to the list of double standards in the ongoing Charter/TPS transparency discussion.

      John Kowalko tried to get the JFC simply demand that charters tell the state where they spend the money they "save" and they refused.
      .
      Hiding in the dark.

      Also, they save money from exclusionary policies like 5 mile radius that shrinks bus routes but gets full $$.

      TPS cannot do that, we serve all kids.At all addresses in district

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    • lastDEconservative

      Wow. They must be using this hidden money to buy scissors and track shoes.

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    • Publius e decere

      LDC,

      Scissors and track shoes? Seriously? The money is certainly spent on Kevlar and “Wall Street” if you listen to the charter-deniers. No no, wait, it is spent on entitlement-delusional wealthy people who are creating exclusionary private schools with public money. Did I miss anything?

      Publius

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    • lastDEconservative

      You may have omitted the phalanx of employees that imagine and then implement the dastardly acts themselves. In hiding — which ain’t cheap.

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  8. Eve Buckley–thanks for addressing my concern–I support choice that is equally available to all within each district.

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  9. So Kilroy, sorry don’t know where to put this comment. It is in relation to those who say that all kids have a right to an education. How about a convicted felon? Did you read the state police report about the boy who had a loaded gun at Dickinson yesterday? In the report, it states that the boy was a convicted felon. Why was he allowed to be in a regular school setting?
    It also said that there was no immediate threat or danger to anyone. A convicted felon has a loaded gun in his backpack and there is no immediate threat or danger to anyone? How can those words even be written? What the hell is happening to us as a society? I think about things I was fearful of or stressed about as a teenager.. it doesn’t even come close to what I feel my boys must think about!!

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    • Pencadermom,

      I offered to send you a report via non-kilroy e-mail; haven;t received you direct e-mail. Still interested? Do respect your wish for privacy.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Well, now we know one school that does NOT have two way, double secret locks on the classroom doors or this would not, could not have happened.

      Common Core Math and Reasoning Question 22:

      Suppose the kid did break Western and the classroom door(s) were locked. And the first two kids to the door weren’t there for the indoctr-, er, orientation on door unlocking, and the next 7 panicked to the point of collapse. Add, oh say, 19 seconds to the time required to commence evacuation. Add 48 seconds to the time required to complete same. When the SWAT team, Homeland Security, and 198 other assorted cops, many overweight and out of breath under the load of several heavy automatic weapons, with riot helmet visors steamed up so bad as to impair vision, and $17.32 million worth of vehicles and gear arrive after all the kid’s ammo is depleted, where will you find … a) any random legislator that voted for the door locks, 2) the fire marshal (extra credit for recalling his preemptive printing of “I told you so” placards), and d) Kilroy.

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    • Give me a break

      Where do you suggest he go to school? At who’s expense? Committing a felony does not prohibit you from a free public education… I’m not saying I disagree with you but the answers are not that simple.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Hey Pmom,
      Hope you’re still tuned in. Gimme just explained how these fiascoes come to be in the first place. Glad I didn’t use up my snark quota doing a sarcastic riff when s/he lays it all out straight up.

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    • “Where do you suggest he go to school? At who’s expense? Committing a felony does not prohibit you from a free public education… I’m not saying I disagree with you but the answers are not that simple.”
      – I suggest a reform type school (sorry, is that a politically correct term or no?) and at our expense.
      Seriously, what do you see in this boys future? Even if the kids at Dickinson were completely safe all day yesterday (which they weren’t in my opinion), still, it would be cheaper to have some alternative, small class setting schools for students like this young man, than paying for him to be in and out of prison his whole adult life. Maybe he can be helped before he, or someone who ‘disrespects’ him, or possibly someone who just gets caught in the crossfire, ends up dead before age 25. Who cares if the answers are simple or not. Enough is enough.

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    • Thanks Greg M.
      Kilroy, if you see this, I am giving you an okay to give Greg Mazzotta my email address, if you don’t mind doing that for me. Thank you 🙂

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    • Pmom, if I read the NJ’s article correctly, it said that pending an investigation of the charges against this student (due process), he will be expelled–along with whatever penalties are imposed through the criminal justice system. I think that means he will attend one of DE’s “alternative” (is that the term used?) high schools, not a regular public HS. So in my understanding, there are repercussions built into our public schl system for students who commit serious crimes. I don’t think his prior felony is at issue in this case, but rather the crimes surrounding gun possession in a school. He faces a number of charges related to that.

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    • I don’t think convicted felons should be in ‘regular’ schools. I also don’t think kids with ankle bracelets should be in ‘regular’ schools.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Hey, infringing on my hard-heart turf, are you Pmom? 😉

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    • I guess. But don’t worry, you own the rights to ‘crazy’ 😀 (just kidding.. kinda 🙂 )

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    • lastDEconservative

      Yeah, crazy. Thinking that those that are willing and able should have to be held back, diminished, share with and live with the consequences of association with the unwilling and the unable. Yeah, I’ll take that. Thanks.

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  10. Give me a break

    Like I said PM I don’t disagree with you. But the dogooders would say different

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    • Give me a break, do you have kids in school? I don’t remember from your previous posts. For the first time ever, I feel nervous about sending my kids to school. I keep looking at my 15 year old and picturing him sitting at school with the kid next to him with a gun in his backpack or something. I can’t stop thinking about this. It’s the second time this week. A kid at Newark last week

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Pencadermon, you need to try and not let it own you. Everyday we go to the mall or shopping there is someone around us carrying a gun and I am talking criminals. The days of an argument in a parking lot or someone cutting you off where it’s just words are long gone! You never know who will pull and gun or knife. Tell your son not to engage in negative behaviors of others (except at Kilroys’ :)).The fact remains more teens have a better change of dying in a car accident going to school then in gun fire at school.You have no choice but to just shake it off. It can happen at any school! .

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    • Thank you Kilroy for trying to ease my mind.. might not work using the car accident scene.. I have a kid in drivers ed right now 😀 You stomped on my foot so I wouldn’t feel my headache lol. But seriously, thank you

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Pencadermom,, Sorry about the car thing and I did think about re: kids driving soon but it’s more of a reality. And as far as when they do drive O WOW it is a sick feeling worrying and as long as they live with you , you’ll worry every time the go out the door. We’re always going to worry about our kids and some how we just can’t let us own it or we’ll go nuts.

      Odds are the student who had the guy was more worried about protecting himself to and from school. Now I don’t want to scare you! But the school should have been lock-down and all bags and lockers search. If the threat to the student with the gun was from another student I doubt he would have snitched on him. For the district and police to assume only one gun was in the school may be a little naive. .

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  11. Give me a break

    I do have 3 children that have graduated recently from public schools. I was always confident that their home training, attention to academic work and their ability to pick pretty good friends kept them isolated from a lot of this. They were the type of kids that would duck into a teachers classroom if they saw a crowd gather for a fight. They formed relationships with teachers and avoided the criminal element. The public schools try to ‘segregate’ as best they can the thugs from real students… I’m pretty sure they didn’t catch this kid in AP History class.

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  12. Give me a break

    Hardened criminal thugs are actually very little threat to goody two shoe type of kids. The two don’t cross paths much. The weird loner type with no criminal record has proven to be much more dangerous.

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    • lastDEconservative

      Soooo, I’m not surprised to learn that compassion dictates dividing the bad guys into tiers or categories, with forgiveness proportioned out accordingly, I suppose. That’s rung out loud and clear in other posts above. But, c’mon, the kids to whom they pose a threat varies? I guess if an All American jock gets dinged up; too bad, he should have acted all goody two shoes in the hallways, just in case a (insert type here) bad guy was cataloging victims in his vicinity?

      And I guess goody two shoes kids can be made fun of sans fear of the PC cops, since the pejorative is aimed at those unlikely to exhibit some shortcoming or other.

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  13. Give me a break

    Most all-American jocks are goody two shoes and don’t interact with convicted felons… Same way if you go to a mall there are probably convicted felons there, restaurants the same, pull in to a gas station and the guy next to you may be a felon but you have so little in common there is no interaction.
    And yes the threat varies simply because they have no interaction… Pretty simple actually

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    • Give me a break

      Oh and I’m not saying it’s a good thing a felon had a gun in school… It is dangerous for sure. I was simply stating that the incidents of Felons opening fire at innocent students is extremely rare

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  14. Concerned Parent

    How does one find out how many seats were open for choice into Conrad and Brandywine Springs, how many students applied, and if any out of district students were offered a seat? I find it hard to believe it is a random lottery when all kids from my child’s school got into Conrad, based on a lottery, while she was wait listed for her 1st and 2nd choices?

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    • I don’t know the figures for Brandywine Springs, but the figures for Conrad provided by the principal were 180 slots for the 6th Grade and roughly 1,000 in-district applicants. From what I understand the only out-of-district applicants even considered would have been under the sibling preference rule. I don’t believe that accounts for more than 2-3 spots, if that many.

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    • According to Red Clay’s School Choice Detail report… looks like Conrad has 226 out of district students. Not sure how that breaks down by grade.

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    • If there are that many in-district applicants, there shouldn’t be any 9th or 10th grades who live out of district at Conrad (except for siblings like Steve mentioned) I clearly remember the director of Conrad talking at high school night when my son was in 8th grade, telling us Christina School District parents that our kids basically had zero chance of getting in.. my kid who was told that is now a 10th grader and I think that was the first year they were all stating that Conrad and CSW were taking all Red Clay kids.

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    • So Pandora, most of those should be in 11th or 12th grade. If not, then something is fishy

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    • There’s always something fishy about Choice. Give Me A Break is correct. If you know the right people, or you are the right people…

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  15. Give me a break

    But if you know somebody it doesn’t matter where you live…wink wink

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  16. I know this is random, but is Conrad a good school? It seems like a good school, in my opinion. I’m new to the district and state and I’m going to high school next year,which means I have to know what school I’m going to. It’ll be great help if you can give me some info. Thanks

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    • Give me a break

      Conrad is a very good school. The choice application time I believe is over but depending where you live you still may be able to get in. Do you know your feeder school?

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  17. Thanks.The choice application time is over.Yes, I’m a student at H.B DuPont right now. But late application I think are acceptable because I just transfer to Delaware,but thank you for your help

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