Delaware’s newest proposed charter school goes beyond smelling a rat

The problem with Delaware charter schools ins’t their existence, its how they come into existence.

Charter School of Wilmington Delaware’s very first charter school was more about finding a way whites students didn’t have to attend school with black students then it was about improving Delaware’s public schools. It also demonstrated how white affluent people can control black community leaders who think they are affluent. Folks, if you’re on the end of being influenced you certainly aren’t affluent. If there were such a thing as a KKK Good Housekeeping Seal Charter School of Wilmington’s organizers would have received one. I was informed a white Red Clay school board member called for Charter School of Wilmington to address the diversity issue at it’s school as part of a condition to add more students. Not once has any black board member called for such conditions in the past on Charter School of Wilmington. But lets get one thing straight, in no way am I being critical of the staff and students of Charter School of Wilmington. The issue of concern is very deep-seeded going back to the days parents of A.I. High School wore arm bands saying “Save A.I.” in response to the desegregation order. Mushrooms are one of the best tasting delicacies on Earth! But just remember it is grown in shit!

We have a new proposed charter school wanting to setup shop in Pike Creek. I don’t oppose a charter school in Pike Creek and in fact support charters in that area. However. some may smell a Rat whereas I smell shit! Who are the players behind the proposed founding board? Who first proposed this dream? How involved is Innovative Schools and the Delaware Charter Schools Network? How was the proposed location selected and who were the property pawnbrokers? Who will be the official legal representative of this charter school? What role does politics and politicians play in this new charter school? Folks, in case you didn’t know, underneath Disney World there is a physical city of support networks making it all happen above ground. The world is full of hidden agenda and agendas with people behind them hidden like silent partners. As for Pike Creek Charter, Snow White is concerning! Talk of how this school will be transparent when the true organizers stand in the shadows isn’t comforting.

So tell me fair-haired one, were are you in this dream? Did you honestly think Kilroy and other inquiring-minds weren’t going to wonder? It may be too late to put the cards on the table and for the one with an eye-fetish something might be getting exposed.

amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas

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44 responses to “Delaware’s newest proposed charter school goes beyond smelling a rat

  1. Publius e decere

    Kilroy,

    Your blog occasionally brings out good points for dialog; however, you consistently undermine your credibility by the way you present your opinions. Your excessive use of ad hominem attacks, vulgar language and incendiary speculation is counterproductive; furthermore, it is squarely inappropriate for an “education” blog. Your December 14th rant about the Charter School Of Wilmington, and about a potential new charter school in Pike Creek, illustrates my point by clear example.

    Your small-minded speculation on why CSW was formed is far beyond the pale. The purpose of the school and the identity/description of its founders are clearly explained in the school’s charter which is posted on the DOE website. Your lack of interest in conveying the facts is appalling.

    As for recent events, CSW asked Red Clay to allow a continuation of its current enrollment level (which it has been at for several years) rather than having to reduce enrollment. Red Clay agreed, quite reasonably. In addition, Red Clay asked CSW to report next June on its efforts to reach out to historically disadvantaged populations as potential applicants to the school. Your post makes this situation appear to be a corrective and punitive quid-pro-quo — it was nothing of the sort. And your comments which reflect color-bound paranoia are not worthy of a response.

    As for the Pike Creek charter school, your endless list of rhetorical questions give readers the impression that you were not at the informational town-hall meeting. True? Your evident loathing of the school’s initiative is also quite evident, and unattractive. The Pike Creek initiative fits the clear intent of the charter school law … not the intent that you and others profess to have inside knowledge of, but rather the actual and clear written intent as expressed in the law.

    The sustainable success of CSW and the goals of the Pike Creek school are consistent with the law, and along with all charter and magnet schools statewide they have clear, positive and overwhelming support within the community. This law and support came about by the will of the people. You spend a lot of effort on your blog touting patriotism … I encourage you to embrace the dream here and ask that you please stop shooting down everything in your sights as a vast undemocratic conspiracy.

    Publius

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “Your blog occasionally brings out good points for dialog; however, you consistently undermine your credibility by the way you present your opinions. Your excessive use of ad hominem attacks, vulgar language and incendiary speculation is counterproductive; furthermore, it is squarely inappropriate for an “education” blog”

      My vulgar words is nothing compared to the racist and morally destructive actions of some charter schools.Charter School of Wilmington despite serving high achieving students is historically ground zero in re-segregation.

      Personally I don’t have issue with CSW expanding student enrollment as long as it doesn’t compromise building safety but I am concern about financial impact on Red Clay’s traditional schools

      .”This law and support came about by the will of the people”

      Yep will of the people re-segregation.

      Say all you want about me but its your soul that needs some serious searching because its apparent minorities students are second-class.

      “The Pike Creek initiative fits the clear intent of the charter school law … not the intent that you and others profess to have inside knowledge of, but rather the actual and clear written intent as expressed in the law”..

      Non omne quod licet honestum est –

      .

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    • Publius, the will of the people, with regard to tax-funded entities, is supposed to be managed by public authorities so that it conforms to laws that constrain the exercise of that will in various ways. The problem with DE charter schools is that there is no management of their operations (certainly not in the case of those theoretically under the jurisdiction of the state board of ed.–but Red Clay’s elected board seems historically to have taken a pretty hands-off approach to CSW oversight as well, presumably out of gratitude for its high test scores).

      If, over time, it turns out that public schools are serving students from more affluent households in vast over-proportion to the presence of such students within their enrollment area, the job of the oversight authorities (esp. when this underservice to low-income students coincides with underservice to racial minorities, as is often the case) is to bring such public schools into compliance with laws that prohibit such outcomes. The outcome itself may simply come about because many families, acting in their own individual interest, find it preferable to send their children to a school with other privileged and high-achieving children. However, the pattern, when these similar individual choices are aggregated, is the concentration of more affluent students in some public schools (e.g. CSW, NCS, & Odyssey charters)–and the correlated concentration of low-income (predominately minority) students in other public schools, esp. the TPS’s in poor neighborhoods. It is the responsibility of the oversight authority–the Red Clay or state school boards–to investigate why this is happening and to correct it, in order to bring DE school systems into compliance with civil rights laws prohibiting race-segregated schooling. They have not been doing this.

      New Castle County’s schoolchild population is becoming poorer and “browner,” due to the recession, higher birth rates in lower income vs. higher income households, and probably migration patterns (in-migration of Latinos from Sussex Cty, perhaps, and out-migration of more affluent families to PA districts). Given that demographic trend, there is no way to get the whiter & wealthier public charter schools that N. DE is generating without concentrating low-income children in other public schools; that’s mathematically necessary. (There is also a draw-in to charters of the ~1/4 of students who attend private schools in the county. That in itself is not nearly sufficient to account for the racial and class imbalances of charter vs. traditional public schools. But certainly part of what the charters with higher-income students are doing is replicating the private school system, at public expense and without generating additional tax revenue for public schools overall.)

      These are very disturbing dynamics, increasing rapidly as more middle class families desire access to N. Delaware’s publicly funded system of class-segregated schools–for reasons that presumably stem from their reasonable desire to advantage their own children through any legally available means. The problem is that some of the educational choices offered by our state do not appear to be legal, in relation to federal civil rights law. It is a good thing, in my view, that Kilroy has worked so hard to draw attention to this pattern. More Delawareans should follow his example by speaking out against it. Kilroy is right that politeness and deference are not going to solve these serious problems–there are competing interests involved, and friction is unavoidable. If segregated charters weren’t benefiting so many DE families, we could fix them tomorrow.

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    • Publius e decere

      Kilroy and Citizen,

      Current law prohibits discriminatory action, it does not proscribe guaranteed outcomes. There are reams of case law supporting this simple distinction. If you think that any public school is discriminating against certain applicants who want to attend the school, then report your witnesses or other evidence of this activity to the authorities and let them handle it. Otherwise please raise the tenor of this dialog and cease the McCarthy-like inference that charter schools and their participating families are racist or otherwise acting with disregard for morals and laws.

      The law is quite simple. It allows for the existence of independently-managed publicly-funded schools, provided that they meet requirements of the law, conditions of their authorized charter (strategy), and measurable standards of student achievement (outcomes). This is fair, democratic, and accountable. If a charter school fails to get results, it can be closed. It would be nice if we could apply this standard everywhere.

      People today are free to choose to apply to charter schools and the law proscribes how such applications may be prioritized. You obviously don’t like the law nor the choices that people make within the law. But when you claim that all outcomes must be equal you are fighting history, not emulating it. Discrimination is abhorrent, we agree on that. But individual choice and differentiation in strategy is NOT discrimination, and that is where we appear to disagree. Requiring equal outcomes started with Marx and ended with Gorbachev. American exceptionalism strives for equal access to opportunities, coupled with innovation and individual initiative; it is not in any way premised on a requirement for equal outcomes.

      Our charter schools operate with authorized strategies, and they can give preferred priority to applicants who live nearby or who have specific interest in these strategies. It would hardly be a good use of public funds to authorize a charter strategy and then force the school to recruit students who live far away or who don’t fit the strategy. Can you imagine success with an integrated-fitness strategy when forced to recruit students who can’t or won’t participate in exercise? Or success with a military science strategy when forced to recruit students who defy authority? Or success with a rigorous STEM strategy when forced to recruit students who shirk academic effort or where they were inadequately prepared for STEM curricula by their preceding schools? Of course each school is not for “everyone” … taken together, they are choices which everyone can choose between with equal opportunity.

      If you feel that schools must drive toward equal outcomes, then do it honestly. Advocate for laws which require that a student have only one choice for their public school regardless of tat school’s strategy, location, safety, size, level of challenge or its actual results. You can even call it the Hobson’s Choice Act. While you are at it, see if you can eliminate AP, IB and honors programs, as well as eliminating varsity athletics, competitions for first-chair in the school band, and student councils. Then see who has your back. Good luck.

      Publius

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    • Publius, the issues are equal ACCESS to publicly funded institutions (not equal outcomes) and segregation of better-off, disproportionately white/Asian students from low-income, disproportionately black/Latino students (not discrimination in the sense of deliberate exclusion based on race or other factors). What we are establishing, systemically in northern DE, is publicly funded schools that disproportionately underenroll low-income students (and therefore students from less advantaged minorities), creating a publicly funded educational system that is more class stratified than even the residence-based system of public school districts that we have long had in the U.S. This is not about promoting Communism. It is about, if anything, returning to the level of equity in access to publicly funded schools of the 1980s–a far cry from socialism.

      DE charter schools may well obey DE charter law. The question is whether they comply with federal laws prohibiting the establishment of racially segregated public schools (and the deseg. order specific to DE, if that still applies).

      “they are choices which everyone can choose between with equal opportunity.” Not true, for schoolchildren–one needs to have a parent or other advocate who can navigate the additional application processes for charter schools (in English, in most cases) and who does not depend on benefits not made available to low-income children at many DE charter schools. My position is that charter schools should provide equivalent services to those offered by other publicly funded schools to ensure that they do not, even inadvertently, discriminate against children (in the same district) on the basis of factors like family income or parental initiative. Currently they do both of these things–you may choose not to recognize this, but it’s quite true.

      Next year in Newark, we will have two freshman HS classes at public schools drawing from significantly overlapping enrollment areas. One, NCHS, will be ~10% low-income, housed in a newly remodeled ($20 million) building. The other, NHS, will be ~50% low-income, housed in a building that has required infrastructural updates for some time, but has failed to receive public support for these. Over the coming decade, do you imagine that families in the area will rally around the poorer students in the less desired HS and try to ensure that they, too, have access to an updated building and excellent curricula? Hardly. We are heading for Mississippi, 1950; not a place & time in which I ever aspired to live.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Publius e decere, your views are welcome here and they are just that, your’s! Same as others.

      “Current law prohibits discriminatory action”

      What the prohibits and what charters, traditional schools and DE DOE does sometimes violates the law. The laws says public schools can’t discriminate based on gender but Delaware charter school law was rewritten to allow single gender schools and for sure if a parent challenged it they would win. Christina school board was denied a copy of a discrimination report by USDOE. The News Journal had to file a FIOA. Education laws are not real laws because school boards and their supers have some-kind of immunity. Red Clay illegal approved Delaware College Prep Charter forgoing a one meeting rule and did not hold a public meeting as required by law! NCLB Wavier process defaced Title 1 Section 1118.

      The reason there are no sense of morals these days even to some of my posting is because the laws are driven by money and egos where morals hold no value.

      “People today are free to choose to apply to charter schools and the law proscribes how such applications may be prioritized”

      Free to apply and if a black at-risk student can be denied base on inadequate intelligence. And yes white and blacks get denied! However, education reform via ESEA/ NCLB was driven by the need to close the achievement gap.

      “The law is quite simple. It allows for the existence of independently-managed publicly-funded schools, provided that they meet requirements of the law, conditions of their authorized charter (strategy), and measurable standards of student achievement (outcomes)”

      The charter school law is skewed to favor discrimination! Yea yea challenge it ! The problem is $$$$$$$$$$! The status quo who held Gov. Carper’s hand down to sign the charter school legislation pisses on the little people.

      Yet is is what it is and when the righteous community leaders claiming to be civil rights leaders stuffing their pocket with greenback go out to pasture a new day will come! I am sure it will be a sister!

      Tell me what do you think Hicks Anderson and Norm Lockman would say about this issue? (God keep their souls) .

      ,

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    • Publius, you haven’t read a word Citizen has written when you blather on about equity of outcomes. Citizen argues for equity of access and opportunity.

      The charter law in DE is fatally flawed in that regard and no measure of your fancy wordsmithing will make that untrue.

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    • Calling Saul Alinsky! Saul Alinsky!

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    • Publius e decere

      Kilroy and Citizen,

      Many charter schools see far more applicants each year than they can offer available seats to. They work through these applicants with legal preferences and lotteries, but inevitably many people are left without a seat and have no choice but to attend other public schools which they do not wish to attend (which is why they were applying to the charter school in the first place).

      One solution is to let these charter schools, if they want to, expand their enrollment without limit in order to offer seats to all applicants. In this case, the charter schools would be unable (under the law) to apply preferences and would have to admit all applicants. And if it is a zero sum game among applicants in the system, then a surge of charter applicants accepted would free up a lot of “traditional” space in the taxpayer’s school buildings which would then have to be offered (by law) to charter schools if that space is not needed for district school purposes. Call it what you want … comparative advantage, creative destruction … it is the natural order of things and has marked our progress as a society. If the “traditional” schools offer a good service, they stay in business but if they offer the masses BetaMax services in a community with BluRay expectations then they are destined for fast obsolescence.

      If a charter school does not wish to have unlimited enrollment, maybe it reflects their strategy (e.g., small schools are more effective than larger ones) rather than some insidious bias which consumes your blog. In these cases, the state and all districts could simply allow more small-school charters to startup and in the end the same result would emerge: a charter school seat for everyone wishing to avoid traditionally-managed district schools and by natural selection the public building space would be available. In the aggregate, there would be seats for everyone and therefore the use of legal preferences would be nullified; these preferences are only permissible as a (logical) way to allocate scarce availability of charter school seats.

      Unless we leapfrog our culture to reach this level of market efficiency, we’ll have charters and traditional schools for the foreseeable future. I get your point (Citizen) about some applicants not having a parent or advocate to help with the charter school application process. Most charter schools offer reasonable assistance for applicants, and I could certainly see that becoming a legal requirement without much controversy. However, since charter schools are public schools why can’t the preceding public schools help with that advocacy? For example, it seems to me that when a child reaches 8th grade they could easily receive unbiased advice and assistance from their MS about the pros and cons of attending a traditional district HS versus any of the charter high schools (rembmer my unlimited enrollment proposal above). If a student has no advocate, then their 8th grade MS counselor can help them fill out a charter high school application. Right? Pretty standard stuff one would assume. Of course if the teachers in that MS are biased against charter schools and only offer help in considering a traditional school then who do you think is under-serving or mis-serving that student? It is the job of the public MS to help each student discover and apply to the best public school fit for their individual needs while avoiding overreach or apathy. For young students entering the system in K, the majority of the problem in applying to charter schools is an insufficient number of available seats and not a vast conspiracy of bias as you imagine.

      Publius

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    • Publius, what we need in N. DE is a way to assess which charter schools (if any) are better at educating the schoolchildren living in this county than the existing district schools. So far we have no way of assessing that, since the county’s (and state’s) highest performing charters–with the exception of Kuumba–all serve higher-income students [and probably children of parents with more education, though DOE does not have data on that] in much higher proportion than district schools do. So what we have “learned,” from DE’s adventures in public school chartering, is that if you concentrate more advantaged children in individual schools and, thereby, aggregate their performance on standard metrics, you get a high-performing school. Not novel information, and not helpful in addressing the core educational needs in this county, which center on the challenges of effectively educating a heavily low-income student population.

      Therefore, I would go beyond your requirement that all lottery entrants be granted admission to charters, because we know from the outcomes of existing charter lotteries that many least-privileged kids are simply not entered; the problem is not simply one of scarcity but, more fundamentally, of demographically skewed lottery participation. I would like to see at least one of DE’s high-performing charters made to serve students with the income and racial/ethnic characteristics of schoolchildren in its stipulated enrollment area, to give the taxpaying public a clear sense of what such schools offer, in comparison to TPS’s, when required to teach a similar mix of students.

      I agree about easing the application process for charters–that should be as streamlined as possible, to reduce barriers for students who have less at-home support for such processes. Again, the state’s charter oversight authority has failed to address these basic issues, and thereby failed to ensure equal access to the current range of DE public schools for children, regardless of household income. [That may soon be the basis of a lawsuit against them.] The results of this failure are glaringly evident in the enrollment demographics of schools like NCS and Odyssey, which begin in early elementary (so the selection issues associated with a HS-only charter like CSW do not apply to them) and yet significantly underenroll low-income and minority kids, relative to the demographics of their enrollment areas. This has been going on for a number of years; hence this blog’s justified obsession with “insidious bias” in DE school chartering. At some point, state negligence in defending equal public school access for the least advantaged students begins to appear deliberate–it is hard to imagine incompetence on this scale, even at the DE DOE.

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    • Publius e decere

      Citizen,

      You make some good points. Better measurement systems would help to capture all ranges of student performance. But I simply don’t buy into the presumed corollary that charter schools should not operate until such improved measurement systems are available.

      You also correctly point out that NCS does not use an interest preference so it is worth looking into. But don’t be surprised if you find that they are following the law and still come out differently from their local population. They are typically over-applied, and they put top priority on preferences for children of founders (unpublished) then children of employees, and both groups may very well reflect different diversity groupings versus the local population and both groups can live outside of the 5-mile radius which is the preference criteria for all other applicants. Their directory shows 145+ employees on staff for 1338 students—if you can find out how many of their students were admitted with the founders/employees preferences then this could explain part of any variance from local population.

      I prefer to seek an answer in the data before drawing conclusions. If a school follows the law in good faith it is hardly fair to call its outcomes unfair.

      Publius

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Publius e decere
      “But don’t be surprised if you find that they are following the law and still come out differently from their local population”

      II am going to agree with you on this point 100% and little more. First, students aren’t usually the decision-maker as to where the attend k-12. Most involved “engaged” parents make those decisions. As far as Asian parents,.we all know education is high on their list and culture factors are a driving force. If you are that closed to CSW then you know about the Asian A. It is the parent that take the steps towards sending their children to charter schools for various reasons.

      Parents send there children to charter because they feel academic programming is better. CSW fits the bill for high to over achieving students and the admission preference supports that. Some parents feel charters are physically a safer environment and better disciplined. Most engaged parents will tell you that want their children in an environment focused on learning with little disruptions. For the most part charters have that and have the power to ask students to leave to don’t adhere to the hand book even in regards to academic. We can have an argument here have charter have another advantage over traditional schools but lets not.

      Should charter schools be required to target outreach events to reach parents who aren’t engaged enough to see the value of charters? I say no! Do charter schools need to promote their schools as open and diversified wanting all current and potential students and parents to fell welcome? YES.

      The 5 mile preference, I don’t really oppose this because using Red Clay as an example there most desirable suburban schools have feeder-patterns less than a 6 mile radius and even some of the ones that aren’t as desirable. Yes there is school choice that cuts across those boundaries. However, with Choice being closed to many of these schools there is no choice. Is Red Clay creating feeder zones and new school building to accommodate white parents / students. Newark Charter have their 5 mile radius in which I believe overlaps in to Cecil County Md. which of course make those MD children ineligible. It all goes back as you noted in one of your comments about those applying.

      Now we’re at a point where charter vs traditional public schools beyond academics. The only preference I take issue us with is the “Specific Interest” DMA is unique because of the military theme. Now my good friend Steve Newton ( I am sure it was Steve) has pointed out honors programs within traditional public schools has preference, you must have honor level academic performance. Magnet schools such as CAB has preferences and Conrad plays off it doesn’t use preferences factors but give it time.

      No were down to the law and morals. In my opinion and I feel the law supports it, no public school should deny students based on handicap, color, gender or academic ability. Sure lets talk about special needs students. There disabilities may require teachers with specialized training and settings unique to the students disabilities. However, all public school district are require to accommodate where as since charter have not district are not required to accommodate special needs students. In reality we have two public school systems and perhaps three with votechs. We can’t deny the many choices parents and students have. I think most of us can agree that charter schools are full of student whose parents are engaged whereas traditional schools have many parents who don’t give a rat’s ass about their children or their children’s education. But that in not the charter schools problem, In comes the charter school reformers who blame teacher unions for all of the failures in education citing charter are the answers.

      The are many issue within the charter school law in need of serious discussion which should exclude special interest such as unions and those engage in helping organize charter schools.

      My unwelcome shots at CSW organizers is meant for those who crafted CSW and as told by former Red Clay board members, it was Red Clay that designed CSW not just someone looking for a charter school authorizing agent. As far as founding board members, they were handed the kool-aid and apparently gave no thought to the needs of at-risk students. However, in CSW original application CSW seems to define At-risk as a CSW student in danger of failing. At-risk to many of us is in the broader sense that includes the impact of poverty. What the founding board members did was to help create the best free private school in Delaware contrary to intention of free pubic schools.

      You can call me offensive or crazy if you like. However, where else can anyone go and put the cards out on the table and go head to head on the issue. As far as the racial tone, do you really think I am the only one in Delaware that questions those concerns? You views and opinions are very welcomed here and if you want to take cheap shots at me go for it if it makes you feel better, I have no doubt you are a decent well intended person and at least you didn’t take a cheap shot at my piss-poor grammar. . ,

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    • Publius, perhaps you’re newish to Kilroy. Some colleagues and I have carefully examined the census block data for the NCS 5-mile radius, and found that they are admitting just over 1/3 the low-income students that they would be, if they drew in students representing the demographics of their enrollment area. Any skewing by founders’ and teachers’ kids cannot account for that 2/3 omission of low-income (and minority) students. Odyssey is worse than this, relative to the NCCo. student population; so of course is CSW, though with different admission mechanisms in place (there is no pretense at CSW of randomness). My assertion is not that such charters should be shut down. It is that they should be forced, by law, to serve students representing the demographic diversity of their enrollment areas. (We can debate whether CSW should be held to this as well, or whether it is acceptable to produce a 2% low-income public school, by means of an admission test, in a district with >50% low-income students across its three other public HS–and given the racial/ethnic disparities that accompany this demographic skewing.)

      The benefits to this legal requirement would be: 1.) allowing tax payers to assess which charters, if any, are out-performing the TPSs that we already fund, and then make well-informed adjustments to the public school landscape in response to this (allow the better-than-TPS charters to expand to meet need & demand, and/or cease funding redundant charters that do no better than TPSs when given demographically similar student populations to teach) 2.) providing admission to the genuinely good charters (whichever those turn out to be) to high-needs students who are currently shut out of them, through a range of mechanisms (some unclear–the DDOE has made no effort to figure out what is causing the underenrollment of low-income, minority students at charters like Odyssey and NCS–again, at CSW the mechanism is more obvious!)

      “I prefer to seek an answer in the data before drawing conclusions.” We have done the same, and as soon as the primary author of our data analysis for NCS has finished writing it up for public consumption, it will be posted. You don’t need very sophisticated analysis to determine that Odyssey and CSW are profoundly underserving low-income and black/Latino kids–an hour with the DOE online school profiles site confirms this.

      “If a school follows the law in good faith it is hardly fair to call its outcomes unfair.” My beef is with the DE law (though there are also some issues of nonenforcement by the DDOE). If we have a state charter code that permits violations of federal civil rights law in the operation of charter schools, then it is severely flawed and must be rewritten to guard against the segregation that is taking place in N. DE public schools (and then, of course, enforced). The public authorities who have done nothing in response to this clear pattern should be held accountable, by taxpayers and the federal courts.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “Publius, perhaps you’re newish to Kilroy”

      Citizen , Publius is not so newish just to commenting. I guess it took me pushing my rants beyond the edge. But you know, I am glad Publius weighed in. I am not a charter hater but a flawed charter school law hater that was developed and penned by some deep-seeded racist who what de facto segregation and undermine the intend of public education free of discrimination. CSW is a fine high performing charter school with an amazing school leader whom I know is working hard to meet some of these challenges. If Red Clay is putting him to task I expect them to offer assistance in diversity outreach.

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    • Publius e decere

      Kilroy,

      Maybe we arrived at a consensus? A charter school which complies with the law and opens its doors to all who apply is a perfectly valid situation. We agree on that, thankfully. We both probably disagree with aspects of Delaware’s charter school law, although we probably have very different reasons for that. Whatever the law is, or becomes, will be the standard by which to consider the charter community’s behavior. If the law were to be changed to proscribe an inflexible allocation of charter school seats on the basis of ethnicity or wealth then I am sure the charter schools would comply. I just don’t think that such laws will get passed in the 21st century, and certainly not without also being equally and accountably applicable to district traditionals/magnets and votechs.

      But wouldn’t that be a spectacle to behold — watching the traditional system strive to attract “advantaged” groups and being required to succeed in that effort or else lose their district authority. How novel. I think we would then see a lot of dogma fall off the plate in all quarters – charters and districts – in such an environment and an outright competition for the “right” mix of students in order to survive. Of course that could also leave open the real risk of massive backroom collusion among charters/districts to allocate students like chattel in order that everyone can survive. In the nuclear age it was a self-protection mechanism called Mutually Assured Destruction; as it would play out here I think it’s called the Law Of Unintended Consequences.

      Publius

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “Maybe we arrived at a consensus? A charter school which complies with the law and opens its doors to all who apply is a perfectly valid situation. We agree on that, thankfully. We both probably disagree with aspects of Delaware’s charter school law, although we probably have very different reasons for that. Whatever the law is, or becomes, will be the standard by which to consider the charter community’s behavior”

      Publius e decere, we do agree on many of the points. And sadly I must use my shock and awl tactics to drive conversation and debate. If I didn’t take it a bit past the line you wouldn’t have responded which did yield good debate that included all who weighed in like Citizen.

      Surely we can agree and admit their special interest in the mix such as teachers union and business round-table folks and lets not forget those on the fringes with the money rakes like lawyers. Education of our children has shifted beyond concerns with the achievement gap and global economy / market is a game changer. Teachers in my generation were geared to provide a manufacturing and service related work force. College bound students were more inspired by parents who wanted their children to have a better life. Parent are an always will be the driving force and putting all these options out there form them like charter, parents will jump at it. It is a dog eat dog world and getting worse. Parents tend to think of their own and not be so concern with children of poverty or better yet children whose parents don’t get a rat’s ass. You might think I display low morals in my rants but honestly there is an element of concerns with race but I put the bait out and sit back and wait for a taker. I move through all the phases of parental involvement going back a good 16+ years. Parents aren’t welcome in policy making and by time they have a clue their kids are out of school and they just move on. But I didn’t! I might have a potty mouth but I do have a social conscious. I am sitting on an amazing life story going back to a day when a first grade teacher kept shoving the pencil in my right hand forcing me to be right-handed and I am a classic visual thinker. I did not allow myself to be bought-off or allow myslef to be awestruck around prominent people and legislators and even Markell.

      There is a deep-seeded agenda that wants to break organized labor’s back and public education seems to be that vehicle. Charter teachers are no better than traditional school teachers and their really is not war on that level. It’s between charter organizer where many point the finger at organized labor when in reality the social norms of society has created serious dysfunction parents resulting in dysfunctional children.
      The wraparound services being put in some schools has zero to do with any fault of teachers or their unions. Charter schools are life boats for parents and students can’t in a school environment where there seems to be no boundaries in street behaviors and negative attitudes towards authorities. The so-called broken schools are a reflection of a broken society. We’re building a dual public school system one for conformist and one for nonconformist. and what is happening is the traditional public school system is being the greater melting pot. Put it this way, Charter schools are treating broken legs and traditional schools are treating cancer.

      If we can get away from labeling schools re:ratings and take in consideration student growth at efforts in helping at-risk students, schools like CSW can take on more at-risk students. As far as CSW they have outgrown Red Clay and the apron strings are getting too tight. Red Clay should have sold the Wilmington Campus to CSW before the last big capital referendum where that build got about 21 million if renovation and took that money an build a new school for cab! Plenty of property next to Stanton School. CAb could have expanded and CSW could have expanded adding more prefence seats to Red Clay students reducing the need to build onto A.I. or other schools.

      Legislators are being pulled around by their $$$ noses and not by reality to the real issues regarding education.

      People called me misguided but remember its the PhD professional selling out to politics that undermine the truth. Schools belong to teachers, parents and students. They are the benefactors of public education and it seems they are denied real shared decision making and voice.

      We honestly don’t need changes in the charter school law but since some charter school “boards” lack any level of social moral responsibility to all children even-though the law gives them latitude to not serve at-risk students we must make changes. Yes most all charter schools comply with the law but does the law comply with real social responsibility?
      .

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    • Publius, demographic allocation targets for any publicly funded school are a good idea. They seem imperative in schools that can exclude students—charters & magnets (votechs, too?). For example, if the proposed Pike Creek Charter is approved, with its 5-mile enrollment radius, the DOE should tell them what the socio-econ & racial/ethnic demographics of that radius are (for the categories on which it collects student data) and should give them enrollment targets, to be reached before the first charter renewal is due–or the renewal is not approved. This should have been done for NCS; there are still school administrators and board members there who believe it serves the demographics of its enrollment radius, which it demonstrably does not. It is absurd that private citizens need to devote hundreds of hours to this work, when we have a data-rich DOE with staff more than capable of generating the necessary stats.

      I don’t know whether TPSs could as easily be penalized for missing demographic targets, since they at least take all students who register (and discrimination against the advantaged, however frustrating, is not a problem of the same import as discrimination against the more marginal—esp. with regard to education, which is most poor kids’ sole chance for improving their odds). But certainly TPSs could & should be incentivized, via state or district policy, to create programs that will draw in middle class families and thereby reduce the concentration of poverty in particular schools. Unfortunately the ballooning charter movement seems to have reduced pressure to improve TPSs, as most families who might otherwise push for that are focused on the charter escape hatch (or have already gone through it).

      Don’t be so pessimistic about the 21st c. It’s just getting started, and this country is due for backlash against the trend toward public school segregation over the past couple of decades (see the Civil Rts Project report posted by Kilroy today). BTW, the backroom collusion that you predict, once discovered, would presumably be actionable. DE residents unduly neglect that handy third branch of government, for reasons I fail to understand (but that may stem from the proximity of better-governed states; it is easier to move than to sue).

      If you are, as Kilroy suggests, a DE Person of Influence, I hope you will use that to good effect—keeping in mind that 1/3 of schoolchildren in this county are in low-income families and could certainly use a well-supported public school.

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  2. Pingback: Pike Creek Charter meeting report « the seventh type

    • Thanks, Mike. I contacted the school’s board after the meeting, via their website, to ask whether they anticipate participating in the National School Lunch Program [which is actually a lunch & breakfast program!], but have not heard back yet. If anyone has heard an answer to that question, please post to Kilroy. In my view, a school focused on physical health should be concerned about nutritional options available to their students (assuming they intend to be available to low-income as well as more affluent students). I don’t know the demographics of the proposed charter’s five mile radius, but you can’t draw a 5-mile radius circle (or pie slice) in NC Co. without including some low-income populations, as far as I know–we have a very large low-income population, esp. among schoolkids, scattered throughout the county.

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    • I received a gracious reply to my query about Pike Creek charter, saying “We do intend on participating in the National School Lunch Program. We believe it’s vital to our school’s mission and vision”–and detailing various other nutrition-related plans, including establishment of an organic garden. Good for them. As I wrote in a brief reply, I very much hope that by “participation” they mean full participation in the meal program, equivalent to what is offered at all district public schools–so that they will not send a message (inadvertently or otherwise) to families and taxpayers that they do not really intend to serve low-income kids.

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    • Further reply from Pike Creek charter: breakfast and lunch will be offered, through the Nat’l School Lunch Program.
      If the school goes forward, it will be interesting (and instructive) to see how successful they can be in attracting a demographically representative student population (based on the demographics of schoolchildren in their preferred admission radius). I hope that they will make a concerted effort to attract an appropriately diverse student population.

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    • Thanks for following up on lunches, Citizen. I’m planning on following up with another post after I see their application. The application is due Jan 2. The public will presumably have a chance to comment at the State Board meeting in the spring.

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  3. Kilroy, I love the mushroom line!!! Way cooler than bucket crabs or whatever. 😉

    Had to delurk for that one. Keep up the great work and commenting, everyone. Hope to have time to rejoin the convo more actively, soon.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      I was born in the year 1954 and my eyes have seen what many have studied. There were many before us who spoke and wrote about the truth and some of us took notes. Norm was a diplomat and Hicks vulgar yet without each there would have been no advancement. King waded through a valley of tears before reaching the mountain top and as for the Red Clay community (not necessary school district) there are those cancerous cell still tattooed with the rebel flag.

      Publius e decere is afraid to admit the deep-seeded racism that live among us. The financiers of Delaware public school long ago should be honored but it was they who rather stand for social justice funded the “color schools” and yet history is repeating itself in regards to charter schools.

      As for Kilroy and his blogging, over 1,000,000 (visit) have be served since Kilroy’s debut in 2006. I’ll take my chances with God’s judgement day rather than that of .Publius e decere and those are being protected. I’d rather have vulgarity in my mouth than in my heart like those creating the de facto segregated school and charter schools that exclude at-risk students but refers them to charter school designed for them. We are far from the days of a small piece of pie is better than none. But yet it still exists. .

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  4. I am guessing they are basing this school on a similar program I read about in sports illustrated several months ago. They had an article about a school that focused on fitness, sports, competition for underprivileged kids. I remember the story had a positive spin and said the reward of being able to compete drove their academic vigor

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “the reward of being able to compete drove their academic vigor”
      This is true and I remember back in the day one student who struggled academically cried his eyes out when warned about being cut from the football team. The beauty was the compassion of his teammates. teachers and fellow students who were moved and help tutor him.

      My with charter schools is the admission process using specific interest and sure why would someone want to go to this school without the interest that is “unique” as DMA. But what happens to these middle school student once graduated? There is no comparable high school! But then again healthy habits start young. HOWEVER, they cards being laid on this table seems to be marked. I think the public and taxpayers needs to see those behind the board driving this potential school. Red Clay has has swim teams and sports with coaches who educates students on healthy life styles and even food service are in turned to more healthy offerings.

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  5. Desegregation entailed not just racial divides but facility divides. There no longer are District induced building divides. CSD, BSD, RCSD, & Colonial are all integrated facility wise. Charters and tech’s have been created and promoted to address the academic performance issue of schools. NOT
    “racist and morally destructive actions of some charter schools”.

    Kilroy, this is both defamation & false accusation. Prove there is a racist action taken by CSW to prevent minority students getting in. Academic performance is the charter and the guideline. Who is high performance entering the school is not within CSW’s control. How are they racist, or any other charter for that matter? Do they have some systematic process to identify and filter out specific races of high performance students? No child has been denied food and how would that be race based anyway.

    Busing was supposed to provide equal access and improve academic performance. Instead the schools have been slowly declining in performance and the voluntary socioeconomic segregation has been one of pragmatism. It is NOT based on race, rather it is based on the correlation that the TPS’s have had to accept a demographic that does not value education the same way.Those that value education or are supportive of education have not acceptably been catered to. I’ll let others draw the correlation to who fills that demographic but it is the reality that very few, if any, individuals I know base their decision on what race of children are in the school. They base it on education for their children. How does Kumba or the proposed Spanish speaking charter not draw the ire of those here if it was a race based decision? Those schools are TARGETING based on race in large part.

    Diversity is NOT a predictor nor a requirement for academic performance. NCS is a multiracial school. So why the Harangue on charters? You really aren’t demanding for diversity, you’re demanding socialism in education. Make everybody equal….Not everybody is equal in their value of education or their ability to recognize the opportunity education can provide.

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    • @M Ryder:

      As mentioned recently on Kilroy’s CSW’s original charter took the students’s application to CSW as sufficient to establish “interest.” The charter was changed (at some point) to use the placement test as part of establishing interest. This was a choice made by the CSW board. This switch of “achievement” for “interest” in the school’s charter need not have been based on any desire to segregate, but segregate it will. Achievement is highly correlated with income and income is correlated with race. How else to do you explain the astonishingly low percent of low-income students at CSW?

      By your claim that NCS is multiracial, I take you to mean that is racially diverse. Fact: the NCS student population is nothing like the student population in public schools living in NCS’s 5-mile radius (see Sec. Lowry’s memorandum with regard to the schools proposed expansion). NCS should have almost 3 times as many African Americans and almost 4 times as many Hispanic students. It should also have about 3 times as many F/RL students. It looks nothing like the public school student population in the 5-mile radius. And if you think you can make the demographics at NCS look better by taking into account non-public school students, you are right, but only marginally better. The percent of students who are non-public living in the 5-mile radius just isn’t big enough to make the demographics at NCS be representative of the combined public/non-public student population in the 5-mile radius. Anyone who thinks otherwise is living a fantasy.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “The charter was changed (at some point) to use the placement test as part of establishing interest”

      Any changes in the charter application provision on such critical matters would required a charter modification request and approved by the charter school authoring agent aka Red Clay. The board can amended board policies as to governance issues but not to admission policies approved by the charter authorizing agent.

      So now we go for an FOIA via Red Clay!
      .

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  6. MRyder, you make the argument, above, that families enter charters in order to separate their children from ” a demographic that does not value education the same way.” That is the point of those, like me, who oppose DE’s existing management of charter schools. The desire of parents to remove their children from harder-to-teach children residing near them is not necessarily racist, as you point out. But the impact of providing families a way to do this, with tax dollars, is precisely to generate a two-tiered public school system, of more- and less-supported students, respectively (students from families who “value education” and from families who may not–though there seem to be other dynamics at work, too, in charters that establish income-based obstacles to attendance by the poorest children, such as via the lack of meal benefits).

    Your point is that parents’ desire to segregate their kids is understandable. My view is that, while it is understandable, it was also made illegal by the civil rights movement–due to the perception that concentrating least-supported kids in particular public schools significantly reduces their chances of getting out of poverty/crime, and thus runs counter to the public interest (i.e. not an acceptable use of tax dollars).

    I agree with you that district public schools need to serve higher-achieving students better than they did for some period in local districts’ recent history (roughly 1990s-early 2000s?). But the state has gone much too far in providing publicly funded schools that cater ONLY to more affluent families. The goal of de-segregated schooling was to foster schools that cater to the range of families living around them. DE needs to embrace that idea–it is not impossible, and there are decent examples around the country.

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  7. kilroysdelaware

    Charter schools are meant to be laboratories of innovation that can be replicated back in the traditional public schools

    § 501. Legislative intent.

    “The purpose of this chapter is to create an alternative to traditional public schools operated by school districts and improve public education overall by establishing a system of independent “charter” schools throughout the State”

    How does an alternative to traditional public schools improve public education overall?

    It seems the improve is driven by competition associated with the money grab where as the money follows the student. However, charters can set preferences that question fair access to public schools as they are called and traditional public schools are excluded for using cherry-picking methods. Governor Markell during his 2006 campaign make references to charters school and re-segregation and cherry picking and creaming of students. Why would he say that if not true? For votes ?

    “Kilroy, this is both defamation & false accusation. Prove there is a racist action taken by CSW to prevent minority students getting in. Academic performance is the charter and the guideline.”

    CSW was created by affluent white who were not happy with desegregation and the did not include the African-American community in the dialogue to ensure admission standards were “constitutional” and fair. Its a know fact that African-American students particularly African-American males make up the high percentage of at-risk students. ESEA /NCLB is rooted in closing the achievement gap between black and white students and certainly that is not part of CSW’s mission. I support charter schools but not the charter school law as it is. If a student /parents completes an application to attend any charter that action in itself demonstrates specific interest yet CSW designs a measurement to weight that interest but cannon conclude there is no interest on the students part.

    ” In addition, Red Clay asked CSW to report next June on its efforts to reach out to historically disadvantaged populations as potential applicants to the school. Your post makes this situation appear to be a corrective and punitive quid-pro-quo — it was nothing of the sort. And your comments which reflect color-bound paranoia are not worthy of a response.”

    Just looked up “historically disadvantage population” in my ghetto handbooks and it means black people and white people use this term because it’s more tactfully and they are not required to look in the mirror. How could Red Clay take such action if there weren’t merit to concerns of discrimination and within the fibers of that discrimination is concerns for African-Americans?

    “Busing was supposed to provide equal access and improve academic performance. Instead the schools have been slowly declining in performance and the voluntary socioeconomic segregation has been one of pragmatism”

    Why was it called desegregation? It was so ordered because “White” America refused access to “Blacks”! Perhaps “if” an open school Choice with transportation was offered by “white” America the disruption of integration wouldn’t have been so disruptive to culturally insensitive whites.

    “If there were such a thing as a KKK Good Housekeeping Seal Charter School of Wilmington’s organizers would have received one”

    LOOK CLOSELY ! “Charter School of Wilmington’s organizers” meaning those who established it! Currently CSW is running of that foundation which needs “correction” and perhaps that is why Kenny Rivera stepped-up to to the plate. But I know for a natural fact that CSW’s senior administrator is in tune to diversity issues that includes race long before Red Clay’s board action. But then again when you have General Stonewall Jackson standing guard change will be slow in coming.

    Minorities of any culture won’t apply to a charter school where they know in their hearts they might be welcomed! Building charter schools for at-risk students might seem noble! However, we could question when or not they may be modern day interment camps. If a charter school isn’t serving students.in a racially balanced setting or rather one very tilted perhaps it should not be permitted and perhaps the school leaders lack abilities to operate a diversified school setting.

    Currently doors of public and charter schools don’t swing open equally and equability and that needs to change.

    We have an education system where racism is alive and well and is being carried out via a tactful twist law that allows participation to feel they are within the law even though that law is morally twisted. Why did Jack Markell question it ?

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    • Publius e decere

      Kilroy,

      Nowhere in the law does it say that charter schools are limited only to those innovations which can be replicated in the traditional public schools. Nor does it say, as you imply, that the burden of sharing innovations is a one-way street from charter to district schools. Nonetheless, there are many things which district schools can replicate from charter schools, and vice versa, if both parties wish to do so. Innovations from district schools include magnet programs, career pathways, and administration of AP-IB-Honors. Innovation from charter schools include uniforms, more limited choices of pathways with more focus on each, ability-grouping in curriculum design, measureable requirements for student outcomes in order to stay open, local governance, employees who are satisfied without unions, and decorum standards which are required of students and families.

      The system of charters, magnets, votechs and traditionals does foster competition for choice, aimed at a constructive competition in which success means that many diverse alternatives will survive and thrive. Not all, but certainly more than one. As for preferences, they are focused on specific interest in the charter’s strategies which is reasonable and more compellingly so when the applicant already has eight years of school behind them. To have the act of application be deemed specific interest is not even logical … if that was the standard then there would be no point in assessing “specific interest” within the “general interest” population of applications. The law quite obviously provides for specific interest as being something more than the act of application to the school and it leaves such an assessment to the school provided that the school has described its approach in its authorized charter.

      You really need to read the CSW charter before continuing to wrongly accuse its founders of racial bias. The people listed on the charter application are a definite mix of races and backgrounds and strong interest in science and math excellence. The fact that you can’t accept the color-blindness of these people says more about you than it does about them.

      As for the Red Clay action, to their credit they did not proscribe an outcome. They simply asked for the school to present its approach to outreach regarding African-Americans, Hispanics and potential applicants in the areas of ELL, special education and low-income. It is a fair request and I’m sure the school will present their activities well. Your use of the phrase “ghetto handbook” is, well, out of line.

      Contrary to your fatuous claim, the doors of Delaware charter schools DO swing open equally and equitably. But not everyone has equal interest in attending them. And in some cases the traditional schools have frankly failed to provide applicants with a sufficiently equal foundation to be successful in such high-expectations schools. So I challenge you to walk the halls of Newark Charter, or DMA or CSW or Odyssey or Pencader and then tell us whether or not the “non-white” students feel intimidated or out of place. I’m sure you’ll find that they are color-blind, focused on achievement, and like most youth they are focused on having fun. They are not stuck in a pre-1995 mentality. Then try and tell them that they can’t go to school there any more … I can’t think of a more certain way to get you focused on the positive realities of charter schools.

      Publius

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    • Contrary to your fatuous claim, the doors of Delaware charter schools DO swing open equally and equitably.

      best line of the night, I’ll be laughing myself to sleep on that whopper.

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  8. kilroysdelaware

    “So I challenge you to walk the halls of Newark Charter, or DMA or CSW or Odyssey or Pencader and then tell us whether or not the “non-white” students feel intimidated or out of place”

    So for CSW why no real outreach to the African-American community ? 26.8% Asian and 4.8% African-American! What you are saying is students have no issues with diversity so why does CSW board?

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    • Publius e decere

      Kilroy and JohnYoung,

      Kilroy: I don’t get your point. Are you saying that CSW is purposely recruiting Asian students? Purposely deflecting African-American students? My guess is that CSW is very aware of their student mix but I also guess that they don’t set out to skirt the law nor turn a blind eye. You really need to be more careful in your accusations. They seem to me, from a distance, to be focused on STEM excellence with an advanced curriculum. Period. And they seem to work well with the magnet school which they share a building with. Maybe you could explain your disproportionate bias against this school and find ways to learn from or build on its clear successes rather than kicking it down.

      John Young: I absolutely listened to Citizen’s argument, but I simply disagree with him. He was using outcome-examples when I responded to his post; in a subsequent post he switched his argument to access and opportunity. You seem quite defensive on this point, a bit of an outlier versus the clear public support for charter (and magnet) schools.

      Publius

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    • kilroysdelaware

      “You really need to be more careful in your accusations.”
      Am I to be intimidated Esquire ? Enjoy your visit here and though we disagree you have a platform to state your position and confront those who don’t agree. BUT if there is truth to what you say, others may benefit. As far as Asian students my point is there are more African-Americans in the community than Asians. How is it Asian students get selected in such numbers? Also it is interesting that the African-American population drop from 2010-11 to 2011-12 and Asian population increased!.

      CSW’s board holds the key to addressing diversity not the school leader and I hope Red Clay who is the charter authorizing authority see this as a weak link.

      Fact is, CSW is operating within the law as it is written and it is the law that needs and will be addressed! As for my civil rights concerns, judgement day is coming as there may be a court intervention. The good sister are seeing the light and will rise to the occasion.

      So tell me, what would Hicks Anderson and Norm,Lockman say about today’s education and an apparent de facto segregation via charter schools?

      You really need to be more careful with your insensitivity to the needs and rights of minorities especially at-risk minorities whom CSW seems not to have any love for!

      I think you and I are done with this discussion

      Give my regards to Chuck

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    • Publius, how do you know Citizen is a male or female?

      also, “clear public support”? From where I sit, it’s clear public concern.

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    • Publius e decere

      Kilroy,

      There you go again! When asked to be civil you assume you are under attack. A psychologist could probably explain this. But to ordinary people it looks like self-consciousness at best.

      “How is it that Asians get selected …”? Really? The right question is “Why does this group disproportionately apply to the school and typically arrive with adequate preparation for and buy-in to this charter school’s strategy?” Who knows, maybe they feel less than welcome at traditional schools. For goodness’ sake man, a charter school’s enrollment by and large reflects the people that apply (interest) and show commitment to its strategy (specific interest). If African-Americans are not applying to charter schools to the same degree as other groups, I’m sure at least part of the reason is that they believe the inflammatory accusations which you put forth on this blog. That makes you part of the problem rather than part of the solution. But I am quite sure that those who apply to charter schools have the same shot at a seat as everyone else.

      I do agree with the statement that “… CSW is operating within the law as it is written …” But I strenuously disagree when you conclude that a person’s support for charter schools is synonymous with insensitivity to the needs and rights of minorities. Nothing could be further from the truth, assuming that truth is your goal. Rather than act as The Dog In The Manger, why not try to respect charter supporters for their commitment to education and their equal right to exist and thrive?

      Publius

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    • Publius says: But I am quite sure that those who apply to charter schools have the same shot at a seat as everyone else.

      Proof please. The burden to prove this lies with the charter operators and frankly your, shall I say fatuous claim, is just that. The makeup of several charters in DE almost on their face refute this point you are making without evidence.

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  9. kilroysdelaware

    Publius ” A psychologist could probably explain this”

    Back in the Hockessin homestead I see! .Had me worried that you were using DuPont equipment to talk your trash!

    ” But to ordinary people it looks like self-consciousness at best”
    Good one! 🙂

    So did someone else at your work use your computer on 03/07/2012 and say this “For the true taproot of the current problems with New Castle County schools look no further than the Honorable Judge Murray Schwartz and his failed social engineering experiment”.

    What allowing minorities some dignity in attending school better equipped schools? Why did the family build white and “color” schools rather than step up in the name of civil rights? .

    “If African-Americans are not applying to charter schools to the same degree as other groups, I’m sure at least part of the reason is that they believe the inflammatory accusations which you put forth on this blog”

    Yea I am part of the agenda to scare minorities away LOL ! Enjoy your Opus One and remember Jesus loves you too,

    .

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  10. The biggest rat I smell is mike Ramone. Somehow he owns a building that local citizens approach him about to lease “I’m just a landlord” with a facility that will guarantee a stream of state funds. “I could sell it for more but they asked me”. Meaning its always better to have a guaranteed stream of income over a one time shot of cash. Imagine that. A state representative make money from the state in an area beyond their state pay.

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  11. It is refreshing to finally read intelligent entries. Publius e decere has it right. XXXXX has hit the nail on the head regarding charter schools vs other public schools in Delaware. I hope she (or maybe he?) continues to write.

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    • kilroysdelaware

      Please don’t out others who comment! Also don’t throw a wrench into my attempts to indoctrinate Publius e decere into seeing the flaws in charters LOL 🙂

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